16 Cool, Mostly Bike-Related Things From the Outdoor Retailer Show

Gear Shoes
15. Snow Peak’s new self-directing headlamp puts light where you’re looking

Functional prototypes of the Snow Peak Motil headlamp looked promising and worked well. The self-directing headlamps run on two AAA batteries and should be available by spring of 2014.

You know those fancy car headlights that look around corners to put light where you’re going next? That’s essentially the idea behind Snow Peak’s new vertically self-directing 2.5-ounce, 110-lumen Mola headlamp. Using a counterweight system they call “Optic Motility,” the beam aims itself up or down to where your eyes are looking rather than where your head is pointed—think automatic tilt adjustor. The $60 lamp hits stores in March of 2014. snowpeak.com

16. Pat’s Backcountry Beverages puts a brewery in your backpack

Pat’s Backcountry Beverages founder Pat Tatera holds a carbonator bottle in one hand and renderings of the packaging for his Black IPA beer concentrate in the other. In a couple months, he hopes to replace the drawings with a cold one.

In the first chapter of the Mountain Bike Bible—the Book of Tomac—Lord Nedly comes down from Durango and presides over a wedding between The Sport and The Quenching Nectar. From that moment forward mountain biking and beer were inextricably joined together as God intended. Problem is, a 12-pack weighs 10-and-a-half pounds, effectively limiting consumption to the very determined, and pre- or post-ride parking lot sessions. And while we’d never condone drinking and riding—or driving for that matter—having a few rounds at camp while bikepacking is actually recommended—you know, unless local, state or federal statutes of where you’re camping prohibit such.

In any case, a couple years ago, a good man named Pat Tatera got evangelical about things and came up with an on-the-spot carbonation system using a specially-designed 20-ounce bottle to mix powdered effervescent, beer concentrate and water, making on-demand backcountry beer. What’s more Tatera—a craft brew enthusiast—spent countless hours perfecting the mixture and claims his first two varieties—Pail Rail and Black IPA—are outstanding, though arcane Utah alcohol laws prevented verification of such. An American lager and nut brown ale are also in the works, and Tatera predicts many more additions over time.

Because the government didn’t know how to classify concentrated beer, it’s taken Pat several months to clear legal requirements. That done, and production starting, the concentrate should be available by year’s end.

You can get some practice now, however, by buying Pats’ starter kit ($36) which includes all the necessary parts and alchemy to make soda, which is already available in five flavors: root beer, lemon-lime, cola, pomegranate cola and ginger ale.

The soda kit will work with the beer concentrate as well, and when available, a four pack will go for a reasonable $9.95 and make 64-ounces, or a growler’s worth of beer.

A few words of warning—the concentrate comes in very portable energy gel-like packets, so you’ll need to be very careful when sorting your rations…or not, said every college kid everywhere. patsbcb.com

16 Cool, Mostly Bike-Related Things From the Outdoor Retailer Show Gallery
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    Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

    With nearly 800,000 square feet of outdoor awesome, the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market exhilarates and exhausts.
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    Brunton Hydrogen Reactor

    The portable Brunton Hydrogen Reactor brilliantly makes energy from water and air using lightweight interchangeable Hydrogen Cores.
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    Sea to Summit

    Despite a pack size slightly larger than a Nalgene bottle, the ultra light Specialist Solo sports roomy proportions when assembled.
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    Thule

    Hard case or soft case, Thule’s new pair of bike boxes each include wheel bags, an integrated work stand and retail for $599.
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    Bacon-Covered Ice Cream

    Hydrogen power, lightweight whatever, blah, blah, blah—THIS GIRL GAVE AWAY SOFT SERVE CONES ROLLED IN BACON BITS. FREE. ALL SHOW LONG. Sorry, I didn't catch the name of the booth.
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    James Crowe and Jordan Hufnagel of West America

    West America collaborators James Crowe (L) and Jordan Hufnagel prepped for their epic motorcycle trek to South America by launching a line of riding gear with Woolrich at the Outdoor Retailer show in Salt Lake City last week.
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    LifeStraw

    Originally created for developing countries and humanitarian efforts, the light, simple and inexpensive LifeStraw stands out in the crowded water filter category as a good pick for bikepacking. About the same size as your mini tire pump, this $24 filter packs well and simply works. Photos courtesy of Lifestraw. lifestraw.com
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    Teva Pivot Clipless Shoe

    Teva's PR manager Jamie Eschette shows how cleats can be adjusted through the top of their new Pivot clipless mountain bike shoe.
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    Field Notes

    A notebook is a notebook is a notebook, right? Not so says Field Notes founder and graphic design impresario Aaron Draplin. The inside covers of his high-quality, American-made notebooks come festooned with useful conversion charts and rulers, as well as less-practical bursts of awesome, like a reference guide for hobo symbols and tips for tic-tac-toe. Just the kind of stuff to put you in a fun mindset for adventure planning—which will be the duty of the $9.95 Steno Book shown here. fieldnotesbrand.com
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    Maria Boustead of Po Campo

    Po Campo's Maria Boustead couldn't find a bike bag that fit her stylish sensibilities so she started a company to make her own. The Pilsen handbag (top right, $75), the Logan tote (top of rack, $90) and the Loop pannier ($115) highlight her versatile line.
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    Jonathan Munk of Goal Zero

    Goal Zero marketing director Jonathan Munk shows off the Switch 8 Light Kit—a combination solar recharger cell and flashlight.
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    TruKids

    Jennifer Adams Bunker (center) and family own and run TruKids, the company behind Hide Outdoors dirt scented sunscreen, which like their kids line is made from all-natural ingredients.
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    Ace Camp Flame Stick

    Ace Camp's Michael Beverly sets a waterlogged Flame Stick alight. The small, lightweight sticks make a great pack item.
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    Outdoor Retailer Displays and Activities

    The OR show featured many unique displays and activities—among them, venerable thermos-maker Stanley's classic Airstream, knife-maker Gerber's murdered-out Honda CB-90, and people doing yoga on standup paddleboards. I don't make up the news, I just report it.
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    Nau

    Nau's forthcoming Tripoly jacket ($255) looks denim but works synthetic, while their Utilize pant ($100) has zippered pockets and a hem that reveals reflective tape when rolled. The lightweight Mojave Dez-Shirt ($98) brings some welcome breathability to the business-casual Friday commute.
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    Snow Peak

    Functional prototypes of the Snow Peak Motil headlamp looked promising and worked well. The self-directing headlamps run on two AAA batteries and should be available by spring of 2014.
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    Pat's Backcountry Beverages

    Pat's Backcountry Beverages founder Pat Tatera holds a carbonator bottle in one hand and renderings of the packaging for his Black IPA beer concentrate in the other. In a couple months, he hopes to replace the drawings with a cold one.
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About the author: Don Palermini

Chicago-born editorial director Don Palermini became a cycling-based life-form in the sixth grade after completing a family road bike tour of his home state. Three years later he bought his first mountain bike to help mitigate the city's pothole-strewn streets, and began exploring the region's unpaved roads and trails. Those rides sparked a much larger journey which includes all manner of bike racing, commuting, on- and off-road bike advocacy, and a 20-plus-year marketing career in the cycling industry. Now residing in the San Francisco Bay Area and pedaling for Mtbr, his four favorite words in the English language are "breakfast served all day," together in that order.


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