2012 Sidi Mountain Shoes Video and Dragon 3 Review

Pro Reviews Shoes

Fit:

Let’s pause here for a second and talk about cycling shoe fit. The cyclist has three contact points: the hands, rear and feet.  The serious cyclist  will experience pain at one point or another and it is a sign of bad equipment or bad fit or bad posture.  The shoe is the cause of much pain as it experiences the most pressure of all the contact points. So the proper shoe and the proper fit is critical. Often, when a cyclist experiences pain they:

  • stop riding or ride less
  • give up on the shoe
  • spend more money on a custom shoe.

The Sidi edict is a little different. They say, that if you experience pain with Sidi shoes or another brand, you are probably using the wrong size. That’s why the Sidi Dominator line has over 80 sizes to find the proper fit for you. Wide, narrow, women’s… they are confident that they can fit you.  Another issue to be aware of is most people have feet that are sized differently. They  recommend that you get the shoe that matches your larger foot. And if your feet as just several sizes apart, they’ll make you a deal and break up a pair for you at cost so you can go home with mismatched shoes to match your feet without breaking the bank.

Riding with the Dragon 3:

I’ve had about 20 rides on these shoes and they’ve been a revelation. The shoes fit me perfectly and power transfer feels direct and responsive.  I always thought I needed wider shoes since I always experience pain at the top of my feet. It turns out that my feet are normal but I’ve been overtightightening my upper straps to get a good fit with other shoes.

The Dragon 3 solution is their adjustable heel retention system.  It is a device on the heel of the shoe that tightens the heel to fit your foot. There’s two screws to tighten each side. It’s a foreign concept initially but once you slip in and fit it properly then it makes sense.  My shoe stays with my foot as I lift up even before I tighten my straps. What a concept!  I get less heel movement and get a much more secure fit.  The best part is I don’t have to tighten my three upper straps that much. I just tension them a little bit and I’m able to get great pedaling action without killing the circulation on the top of my feet.   Sidi finds that many cyclists over tighten their straps just to compensate for a shoe that is not made well or doesn’t fit well.

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About the author: Francis Cebedo

The founder of mtbr and roadbikereview, Francis Cebedo believes that every cyclist has a lot to teach and a lot to learn. "Our websites are communal hubs for sharing cycling experiences, trading adventure stories, and passing along product information and opinions." Francis' favorite bike is the last bike he rode, whether it's a dirt jumper, singlespeed, trail bike, lugged commuter or ultralight carbon road steed. Indeed, Francis loves cycling in all its forms and is happiest when infecting others with that same passion. Francis also believes that IPA will save America.


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  • Matt says:

    You say, “In the grand scheme of things, these are not cheap.”. I disagree. It is especially in the grand scheme of things that these become cheap. Most shoes last about 3 years. If the average shoe purchase is $150 dollars and lasts for that 3 years you’re paying $50 a year. One pair of Dragons at $450 over that 10 years is $45 a year. It’s an even better deal if you buy a Spider or Dominator as they’ll last that long, too and are cheaper.

  • Doug says:

    I’ve used Dom 5″s for 3 years and Spiders for 3 also. I got a pair of Dragon 2 but didn’t like the fit, as much as the Spiders or Dom 5. Sidi’s feel better great but pick the right model for you. The SRS is not cheap but gives better grip than the Dom 5

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