2019 Cannondale’s Jekyll 29er released into the wild

Cannondale's Jekyll 29er gets shorter travel, maximum rollover.

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The Cannondale Jekyll 29er gets released to the wild, with a big-wheel revamp, Gemini tuned shock, BallisTec Carbon front-end and much more.

The Cannondale Jekyll 29er gets released into the wild, with a big-wheel revamp, Gemini tuned shock, carbon front-end and much more.

Now with a more aggressive trail geometry and added stability, the Jekyll 29 is designed to roll fast over rough terrain. The big wheeled Jekyll shares a carbon front end design similar to the carbon 27.5″ version, employing Cannondale specific BallisTec Carbon, allowing for maximum protection and strength.

Cannondale’s Ai offset drivetrain (like it or not) is all over the Jekyll 29er, including ISCG 05 tabs, modular internal cable routing, PF30 bottom bracket, a future-proof flat mount rear disc brake mount, a tapered headtube, and Boost spacing.

Cannondale’s Ai offset drivetrain (like it or not) is all over the Jekyll 29er, including ISCG 05 tabs, modular internal cable routing, PF30 bottom bracket, a future-proof flat mount rear disc brake mount, tapered headtube, and Boost spacing. Cannondales Ai offset drivetrain allows for super short chainstays (442mm to be exact) more tire clearance and added frame stiffness, though, this requires the rear wheel to have Ai-specific dishing. A 65° headtube angle and long front center are said to give the Jekyll a whippy feel without sacrificing the get-up and go pedaling efficiency.

The Jekyll 29er utilizes Cannondale’s Gemini suspension system that is co-developed with Fox racing shocks.

The Jekyll 29er utilizes Cannondale’s Gemini suspension system that is co-developed with Fox racing shocks. The Gemini adds two ride modes (Hustle & Flow) to the Jekyll 29er. Flip to Hustle to shorten the travel and ramp up the spring rate for a snappier, more responsive feel for pumping through turns, etc. Flip back to Flow for full travel when things get rough, and you need max travel. Updated with shorter travel and dynamic rollover, the Jekyll 29 is throttled back to 150mm in the longer Flow Mode and is matched to the same 150mm of front travel (vs. the 165mm frame/170mm fork of the Jekyll 27.5). The overall suspension layout remains the same for the 29er vs. the Jekyll 27.5 and uses the same high single pivot, faux-bar design with a long link driving the high-mounted shock allowing for out of the mud, full water bottle storage.

The $6500 Jekyll 29 1- is decked out in a SRAM X01 Eagle 1×12 drivetrain with Code RSC brakes, Stan’s Flow wheels, and Fox Factory suspension.

Cannondale’s newest beast is available in three build options: The $6500 Jekyll 29 1 is decked out in a SRAM X01 Eagle 1×12 drivetrain with Code RSC brakes, Stan’s Flow wheels, and Fox Factory suspension, including the DPX2, piggyback air shock. The mid-tier Jekyll 29 2 dials back to Fox Performance suspension, again with a DPX2, then to a mixed X01/GX Eagle drivetrain and XT brakes for $5300. Rounding out the most affordable option at $3800, the Jekyll 29 3 goes for the SRAM GX/NX Eagle mix, Guide R brakes, and Fox Performance suspension with a single chamber rear shock. All three get Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5″ front & DHR 2.4″ rear tires with different casing specs.

Geometry discussion

The new Jekyll 29 come in four frame sizes (S-XL) and three build options, as of right now the carbon front and alloy rear remains the same throughout the line.

It’s proven in the Enduro World Series by Cannondale athlete Marco Osborne. It uses standard parts now with a few twists here and there to provide a competitive advantage. And the value it delivers is compelling. Interested?

More Info: https://www.cannondale.com/


About the author: Jordan Villella

Jordan comes from the steep streets of Pittsburgh PA, where he learned to dodge cars and rip single track. He has been involved in nearly every aspect of the cycling industry: from turning wrenches, store design, clothing production and bike park creation. Jordan spends his free time racing cross country and cyclocross around North America, though he has been know to enduro every now and then. His love of cycling is only second to his love of his family and punk rock.


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