Cannondale Trigger 1 and Trigger 2 OverMountain Trail Bikes Announced

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The Cannondale Trigger is a brand new model that falls into their “OverMountain” category. Within this category they further break it out into Big-Mountain (represented by the 180/110mm Claymore), All-Mountain (150/90mm Jekyll) and Cross-Mountain represented here by the 120/70mm Trigger.

The Trigger is aimed at the fast trail riders who have the fitness to hammer the hills but ride trails that aren’t demanding enough to need the travel of the Jekyll or don’t ride as aggro. The Trigger’s geometry is not as slack as the Jekyll and slots in perfectly between the cross country Scalpel 29 and RZ One Twenty and the all mountain Jekyll.

Key to the versatility of all the OverMountain bikes in Cannondale’s line-up is the DYAD rear shock (the design might be familiar to keen eyes) that has two chambers that switch from long travel to short travel instantly.

The Trigger features:

1 TRAVEL: 120mm to 70mm on-the-fly adjustable rear travel. (*some models have 120mm travel X-Fusion P1RL pull shock with platform lockout.)

2 DYAD RT 2: A smaller DYAD shock provides the same two-shocks-in-one benefits and performance of Claymore and Jekyll, but dialed for the Trigger: shorter travel Elevate mode delivers near race-bike efficiency, while the longer travel Flow mode offers up a plusher, all-mountain feel.

3 GEOMETRY: Trigger is more than just a Jekyll with less travel. Its lower stance and slightly steeper head angle results in a more nimble feel especially at slower speeds. The perfect balance of quick and stable.

4 ATTITUDE ADJUST: Switching to the Elevate mode on the DYAD reduces the sag point, which raises the BB and makes the head angle steeper for a quick, efficient feel. Flowmode drops the BB for a low, stable feel.

5 ECS-TC SYSTEM: Clamped, 15mm thru-axles in the shock linkage and swingarm pivot eliminate flex and provide unmatched center-stiffness for complete control.

FRAME: Cannondale’s BallisTec Carbon construction and the Lefty fork make for an unmatchably light and stiff bike.

The Trigger is available in 2 models, the Trigger 1 and Trigger 2 with the biggest spec differences being the carbon Reynolds wheels and XTR rear derailleur and brakes vs. Mavic alloy wheels and SRAM X9 rear derailleur and Magura brakes. Both come in S, M, L, and XL sizes. The MSRP for the Trigger 1 is $7700.00 and the Trigger 2 is $5550.00

Key technologies to the Trigger are the Fox DYAD RT 2 Dual Shock which allows for Attitude Adjust Geometry and also the “Enhanced Center-Stiffness, Torsion Control” which removes flex and play from links and pivots.


Fox DYAD RT 2 Dual Shock:

The world’s only true 2-in-1 shock
Lurking inside the DYAD are two different shocks – one short travel (Elevate) and one long travel (Flow) – which allow you to completely change your bike’s performance on the fly.
Separate Damping Circuits
Each mode has its own dedicated damping circuit, tuned for that travel. The Elevate circuit is tuned for maximum efficiency for climbing and flats. The Flow circuit is tuned for maximum plushness and control. In either mode, the other mode’s circuit is completely closed so it can’t interfere with the proper damping performance.
Separate Spring Rates
The Elevate mode has a steep, progressive spring rate which delivers great traction as well as great pedaling efficiency. The Flow mode has a flatter, more linear spring rate which delivers a plush, predictable suspension for high speed descending.
Low Center of Gravity
The pull-shock design keeps the shock’s weight centered just above the bottom bracket, giving the bike exceptional stability and agility.
Custom Tuned Options
Claymore, Jekyll and Trigger each get their own version of DYAD with custom stroke lengths, custom air volumes, and damping dialed for its intended riding style by the masters at FOX.


Attitude Adjust Geometry:
Different parts of the trail demand different geometry. Climbs or tight technical terrain requires quicker handling and an efficient riding position, while flat-out descents require a lower center of gravity and stable handling. The DYAD shock delivers both.

Travel-specific Geometry
Switch between the DYAD ’s two travel modes and the bike’s geometry changes with it, thanks to a 40% difference in sag heights.
Elevate Mode
In the shorter travel setting, there is less sag so the BB sits higher and the head and seat angles are steeper for quicker handling and
powerful climbing.
Flow Mode
In the longer travel setting, the shock gets full sag and the lower BB and slacker angles provide great high-speed stability and cornering.


ECS-TC (Enhanced Center-Stiffness, Torsion Control):

A multi-part system designed to remove the flex and play from the links and pivots for the ultimate in responsiveness and control.
15mm Clamped Thru-Axles
Oversized thru-axles are clamped on either side by the link or swingarm, tying the two sides together and dramatically increasing stiffness
Doubled Rear Pivot Bearings
Two bearings placed side by side in each rear pivots eliminates twisting play for solid responsiveness.
Wide Stance Bearings
All links have the bearings placed as far apart as possible to maximize stiffness.

Availability for the Trigger is August.

For more info: www.cannondale.com

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About the author: Gregg Kato

Gregg Kato studied journalism and broadcasting in college while working many different jobs including deejaying, driving a forklift and building web sites (not all at the same time). Kato has been the Site Manager of Mtbr.com for over 12 years and enjoys riding local Santa Cruz trails. Besides being an avid mountain biker, he is also a motorcycle fanatic. Two wheels, one Passion.


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  • ginsu says:

    Just another Faux-Bar!! Why wouldn’t you just buy a 15 year old MTB if they have the same suspension design?

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