26er Reviews and News


Cleary Bikes Scout 26” and 24” kid’s bikes


Cleary increases its kid’s bike range with new 26” air fork equipped hardtail.

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Jamis Bikes releases new 3VO suspension platform


Jamis Bikes new 3VO design dropping at Sea Otter claims a unique instant center, center of curvature and axle path that is said to eliminate unwanted motion when pedaling.

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  • smoothmoose says:

    Interesting take on dual pivot design. New bikes don’t seem pushing the LLS geo much. But interested in hearing the ride reports.

  • Doodgehull says:

    Holy Batman of chain growth,

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>Holy Batman of chain growth,
    You have info on this? Do tell.

  • benito says:

    I’d hate to admit I’d ever buy a bike based on how it looks but these certainly seem like a big step forward aesthetically. At least compared to Jamis’s DS options over the past few years.

  • Tom says:

    Go Chris! Should be called “Speedgoat Sus” though.

  • ezE says:

    tanks for keeping 26’rs alive!

  • dave says:

    Holy cow! I had a Jamis with a single pivot and after 4 warranty rear triangles got rid of it. They couldn’t do a simple single pivot right and now they do this contraption? Good luck!

  • Bnystrom says:

    There appear to be at least 12 bearings in the linkage, plus the top and bottom shock pivots. This may be the “holy grail” of suspension design (who knows?), but how long will it last? I have nothing against Jamis, but like others above, I have one that had a rear triangle issue due to poorly aligned and installed bearings. This one has 50% more bearings, which really makes me wonder.

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Canyon Dude CF 9.0 Unlimited Fat Bike Review


German direct-to-consumer seller Canyon makes virtually every kind of bike, including the fully rigid Dude CF 9.0 Unlimited fat bike. See how it fared during a Colorado winter’s worth of testing.

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  • ryon says:

    Is this a 27.5 wheel or a 26?

  • Zoso says:

    A sloped top tube is a GOOD thing, not a CON. Don’t think you’ll care about limited frame bag options on this bike when you rack your nards on the top tube. Any fat bike that has a high top tube like a road bike doesn’t have a clue what snow is all about.

  • Bucktooth says:

    Zoso nailed it! Post hole off of a packed trail and tell me again that you wish your TT had less slope

  • firevsh2o says:

    Yes a XL is needed. I am 6’3″ and I have a large Dude since about three years but I really wish for a XL size! Otherwise it is a really good – and cheap for what it is – bike.

  • Wayno says:

    Would be nice if they offered a front suspension. Don’t need it for winter riding but I like riding my fatbike on singletrack in the summer also.

  • zuuds says:

    Con: Canyon is completely sold out of these. I emailed them and they won’t be back in stock until the 2019 models come out this fall. Hopefully the 2019 model will be in BFat / 27.5″ and a 177mm rear end.

  • Dickachu says:

    Hey, halo its available since 2015 and just now someone wake up?
    Waiting for 3×9 and disc brake reviews

  • Cyclotoine says:

    Read this review thinking “Hey, this might be the upgrade that finally gets my to sell my 2014 Mukluk!”… Then I got to the bottom and saw no XL 🙁

  • Will Urich says:

    Can’t wait to be a working stiff so I can afford another bike….

  • adin.maynard@gmail.com says:

    This bike rips. I have to also mention the customer service was great from the Cali based US office – questioned answered, fast shipping, easy to put together. I picked up one of the last 9.0s here in the US.

    I had two issues with the bike: the JJim 4.0 tires, which I find almost useless in any snow. I put on some 45nrth Beists and it’s working great, though much heavier. The JJims are ideal for dirt however. I’d rather the bike shipped with fattystripper system for tubless instead of tubes. And, there is no frame access small panel at the base of frame, to easily run a dropper post. Not a big issue as plenty of people still figure out how to run the internal cable. My Pivot I have is super easy with this access.

    After comparing a few options to upgrade from an Al Farley, the geo numbers were spot-on: longish reach, not too slack. The wheels are stellar and a great value. Still getting used to Eagle but that won’t be a negative after more miles. (singlespeed only mtber) . At 5’10” I’m on a medium and swapped the stock 60mm stem for a 70. Canyon is going to sell a lot of these.

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Trailcraft Cycles Big Mesa 26+ launched


Trailcraft has unveiled its new Big Mesa 26+ for riders in XS and small sizes wanting true “plus” size tire capability, but in a complete bike package which fits riders from 4’10” to 5’6″.

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1992 Brent Foes LTS Prototype


Back in 1992, the 6” travel LTS was revolutionary. Click through to learn why.

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  • Handbuilt says:

    Great article,
    Those brakes look like the Paul Brodie ‘Rockin Roosters’ made in Vancouver.
    Love the classic handbuilt FOES, Intense and in this case Brodie bits

  • I'mRight says:

    Here’s the actual bike, upsidedown fork and disc brakes!
    (sorry can’t figure out how to add a picture)

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2018 Fox 36 first ride


Three years ago, Fox was thrust once again into the lead position of big hit fork performance with the introduction of the Fox 36. Today, the chassis is still sound as the latest Fox updates are applied to push it even further.

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Marin Alcatraz Dirt Jumper returns


Anyone out there have a soft spot for dirt jumpers? Marin’s latest has great lines, a killer paint job, and was designed in conjunction with one of the best slopestyle riders.

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Mongoose’s new bikes for 2017 – the Tyax Supa plus bike, Argus 24 mini fat bike, Teocali and more


Mongoose ditches direct-to-consumer sales and 2017 models will be sold through Amazon.

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  • GuyOnMTB says:

    Tektro does not make the Slate-T4. That’s TRP that makes the Slate-T4’s. I know, I have them!

  • ljsmith says:

    Bikers are usually pretty brand conscious. I am not sure how Mongoose plans to sell many of these (especially at these prices) when they have dragged their name through the mud with Walmart bikes. They really need to decide what they want to be, cheap POS bikes, or “real” mountain bikes and develop their brand accordingly. Its going to be hard to play in both markets.

  • Zack says:

    When Will The 2017 Models Go On Sale?

  • royaloaker says:

    thanks for the update-good to see the brand lineup expansion.the 2001 Valiant “hot-link” rear suspension is still one of the smoothest out there.

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Matt Macduff’s prototype Altruiste is the slopestyle bike of your dreams


To try and break the record for the world’s largest full loop, Canadian Matt Macduff collaborated with custom builder Altruiste bikes to build an insane custom frame.

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Jamis rolls out women’s 26+ Eden trail bike


Jamis has debuted 26+ versions of their Dragonfly and Eden models, which the bike maker believes makes perfect sense for women riders.

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  • GuyOnMTB says:

    This whole guys colors, girls colors thing is stupid. The girls colors have been so much better the last few years!

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Stan’s NoTubes redesigns Arch, Crest and Flow alloys wheels


The preeminent pioneer of all things tubeless is going wider and lighter with its cross-country, enduro and downhill-oriented alloy hoops.

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Transition unveils new Triple 26er Slopestyle bike


The new Triple is the successor to Transition’s beloved Double slopestyle bike.

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First Look: Trek Fuel EX Jr kids trail bike


Trek harnessed all its design, manufacturing and suspension expertise to design a bike for kids, using the 26-inch platform and designing geometry and suspension valving specifically for kids from 4’4″ to 5′ tall.

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  • Rob says:

    I hope other bike manufacturers take note, especially in the xc area. It is getting more and more difficult to find a well equipped 26″ XC bike for tweens to learn and race on. The 26″ should be the top of the line Jr bike.

  • Sport says:

    Ah……all my mountain bikes are 26’ers…..I am 5’10″…..Guess they call this a “kid’s” bike vs a “woman’s” bike as some boys might not want to ride a girl’s bike?

  • Shark says:

    Why the heck hasn’t Trek made a 4″ tire version of the Fuel EX yet….pretty sure they’d sell more of those than a kids version….

  • liquidSpin says:

    There’s a reason most bike companies won’t make comparable mtb bikes for Jr’s….demand. Most parents would love, I mean LOVE to buy their kid an awesome bike. However, the reality of it is most people can’t afford to blow so much on a bike. Especially if they have more than 1 child in their household.

    Kids can’t actually afford a $2,000 bike. Well maybe some or the obsessed ones who save all of their allowance and or summer job money. So bike manufactures are of course hesitant to release a full on trail bike with full suspension.

    So, most parents who are middle class are going to think…do I spend $2,000 on my kids bike that he will eventually grow out of or do I just give him a regular cheapo bike from REI or Hudson trail that costs significantly less.

    Also, the point I’m making doesn’t totally apply to rich or white collar families or families living near such places like Whistler 🙂

  • phat phred says:

    I saw the Trek Jr and other small adult dualies selling for $1.5-2k weighing in around 30-35lbs and came to the same conclusion as Joe N…. absurd at almost 50% of rider weight.

    So I bought and assembled the following:
    China carbon Cube branded 14.5″ hardtail frame from AliExpress,
    26″ Stans Crest rims (on blowout sale) based wheels (or look for similar lightweight, used 26″ wheels on ebay),
    used 26″ QR SID world cup from ebay (changed oil to 2.5wt, dual air or solo air sets up nice for light weight riders) and
    parts group of choice from UK or Germany (xt cranks come in 165mm).
    Result: 21lbs or 22lbs including thudbuster seatpost.
    I spent less than $1.5k on a bike equivalent to something that would MSRP for well over $3k. My son was so psyched when he first picked it up compared to the tanks we had been looking at in the stores. Then he rode it and the 26″ wheels make a huge rollover improvement compared to 24″.

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Eurobike 2015: Continental Der Baron enduro tire


Highlights include puncture protection and multi-purpose tread pattern with Black Chili compound.

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First Look: Rocky Mountain Maiden downhill bike


Optimized for either 26” or 27.5” wheels, the Rocky Mountain Maiden’s four bar Smoothlink suspension rotates on oversized bearings and collet axles. New braking technology, integrated frame protection, and electronics compatibility are some of the highlights.

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First Look: Felt Fat Cruisers


Fat bike tires breath new life into Felt’s line of cruisers for sand, snow, pavement or dirt. Check out the Speedway, the Float and El Niño.

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Outerbike Whistler: Hot bikes, amazing trails, good times


Consumer-facing trade show in B.C. wonderland serves up biking bliss with hundreds of demo bikes, and access to the world’s most famous bike park.

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Review: Bontrager Hodag Tire and Jackalope Wheels fat bike tubeless system


Bontrager sought out to build a tubeless fat bike wheel and tire system that is capable in all conditions but is still fun to ride. Have they succeeded?

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  • Steve says:

    Jackalope 26x?

  • Don says:

    3.8? I’m sorry but that’s not really fat anymore. Husky, but not fat. Bonty needs a 4.8

  • mikeetheviking says:

    Industry states “Fat” begins at 3.8, So this is basically the skinniest “Fat” tire out there:) I guess sometime it’s good to be skinny and fat. I’m glad Bontrager is headed this direction, especially with the new Hodag size 27.5 x 3.8….. Bonty be pavin’ dem trails baby! Ans sidewall protection! Bout time we started seeing more fat tires with sidewall protection….

  • McSpiffy says:

    I know showing up almost three years later to comment on this is weird but I’m happy to see Trek/Bontrager embracing Wisconsin lore by naming their tire after the mythical Hodag creature. Brings back many memories spent up around Wausau/Rhinelander/Eagle River back in the late 80’s and all the hype about the Hodag!

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First Look: Bontrager Jackalope wheel and Hodag fat tire


Bontrager introduces a true tubeless wheel and tire system for fatbikes.

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First Look: Transition powers new-gen 2015 bikes with GiddyUp suspension platform


First Look : Transition Bikes’ all-aluminum fleet of ‘up and down mountain’ bikes ditch trendy labels for practical four-bar link bikes that just work.

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Interbike: Yuba Bicycles Mundo, Boda Boda and new Flip Flop cargo balance bike


Electric options breath new life into cargo bikes and the world’s first kid’s cargo balance bikes.

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First Look: Cogburn CB4 hunting fat bike


Fat bikes are segmenting into many different markets and the Cogburn CB4 is here to cater to the hunting and fishing crowd. It’s a great alternative to ATVs and it brings the cycling lifestyle to a broader range of folks.

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First Look: Salsa Bucksaw full suspension fat bike


The Salsa Bucksaw is a 100mm front suspension fat bike with Weagle Split Pivot suspension. Is it an anomaly or is it the start of a new category?

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  • trailsnail says:

    Meh! I’m just not seeing it. We went from comments about fat bikes being like fat girls, fun to ride but you don’t tell your friends to portly fat rides that are sloppy. I’m gonna stay clear of these honeys. Because we digress.

  • jason says:

    I’ve been riding the fat more than any of my others. might just sell them all for one of these

  • Don says:

    Snow Basin wasn’t rocky enough huh? Should have taken it up the Northern Skyline to Ben Lomond.

  • tando says:

    As crazy as it sounds I think this would make for a good tandem design. On the tandem I’m always struggling to find traction because I can only fit a 2.4″ tire on the back of my Ventana El Conq, and when it gets steep (expert/ black diamond level terrain) I never have the grip I would like in the back. Sometimes I even run out of front wheel traction (under steer on a bike is a weird sensation). Also, anything to get rid of some of the harshness in the back would be appreciated by my lovely stoker.

    I wouldn’t be worried about the reduction in bike handling since that has already gone out the window, and traction is almost always our limiting factor on steep terrain.

    For a single bike though? NOPE!

  • dan says:

    Try testing that at Mammoth(aka. pumice mountain)

  • Dan says:

    Looks damn sexy, I’m intrigued…

  • Alan says:

    I’ll start buying Salsa’s again when they get rid of the Press Fit BB and Integrated headsets. Cool bike, but a non-starter due to the gimmicky, cost-cutting component standards. I miss the days when Salsa was a bike company for riders by riders.

  • John Rahm says:

    I rode this bike yesterday at the demo in Bend OR, hoping for a “quiver of one” option. Must say, descending it was really fun, great traction and very nimble. Not sure I could live with the inertia of the very heavy wheels/tires. Crawls nicely up steeps but moderate climbs are hard work, Accelerates as you would expect…slow.
    Rode the Horsethief too, loved it. I’ve ridden several similar 29ers (Tall Boy, Camber, Stumpy) Horsethief was hands down the best experience. Felt completely at home on the bike from the first pedal stroke.

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Video: Scott Gambler 710 with Brendan Fairclough in Schladming


We rode the Scott Gambler 710 in Park City, Utah but Brendan Fairclough shows us here what the bike is really capable of.

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First Look: 2015 Mongoose Argus alloy framed fat bike


Mongoose follows up their popular Beast and Dolomite fat bikes with the all new Argus. Featuring an alloy frame and fork, 2×10 drivetrain, disc brakes and serious trail geometry, the Argus is legit.

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  • Gary says:

    Not bad, I have always thought most Fat bikes are over priced for Rigid HardTails.

  • Brian says:

    Will this still be a “Wallyworld” bike or will it be available through a LBS?

  • singletrackmack says:

    Aluminum fork?!?! No thanks. That mixed with an aluminum hardtail frame makes for one harsh ride even with fat tires. Steel is the way to go on a rigid fork for sure, and steel makes for much nicer a ride for a hardtail as well. Wonder if they will come out with a sub-1K light steel alloy frame and fork. I would be interested in that.

    • Singletruckbuck says:

      Get real Mack! No way you can sense the subtly of alum v. Steel w/ 4″ tires in the mix.

      • Singletrackmack says:

        From Graham Cycles “Steel provides what many consider the best ride quality; it is the measuring post that other frame materials are judged against. It has a lively feel that aluminum lacks, and carbon fiber tries to emulate. Steel’s ductility (flexibility) helps smooth out the bumps of the trail or the vibration of the road”
        http://www.grahamcycles.com/why-steel/

        • Fasterjason says:

          I don’t know this guy Graham, but you should fact check first before quoting (at least you gave a source).

          A material’s ductility is not a measure of “flexibility” (an elastic deformation), rather it (ductility) is a measure of plastic deformation, into a wire-like form I believe. The term I think you are looking for is Young’s modulus.

          Big difference between elastic and plastic deformation.

        • z1ny says:

          Mack sorry but you’re completely misinformed.
          1. Anyone pushing steel is trying to charge you more for less expensive materials. If steel was so wonderful, why are people consistently choosing aluminum and carbon bikes? Steel is by far the easiest and least expensive out of the 3 to work with. The whole ‘Steel is real?’ Its just marketing BS.
          2. the MATERIAL used is only half the equation. You are being completely ignorant if you neglect tubing diameter, which has WAY more effect on the stiffness of a frame. DO you have any idea WHY Aluminum tubes started with bigger diameters, i.e. Cannondale? Because aluminum has way more flex than steel.
          Learn your metallurgy.

  • brizzy says:

    Dude there is no way you’re gonna tell the difference in ride quality between steel and Al when you’re running 8psi in your 4″ tires. Compare the deflection of the tire to the possible deflection of the frame/fork, it’s not even close.

    • Singletrackmack says:

      From Graham Cycles: “Aluminum – A great material for making bikes that are extremely stiff and light. Aluminum offers a cost conscious option for riders seeking light frames. Where aluminum suffers is in the area of ride quality, most people describe it as a harsh, unforgiving ride. This can be masked with carbon components, and suspension, but the frame is still the heart of the bike”
      http://www.grahamcycles.com/why-steel/

  • yo says:

    Blah blah blah. Die commenters die

  • duder says:

    Its obvious singletrackmack has never ridden a bike before.

  • ZombyWoof says:

    I recently saw one at the local Walmart.

  • Johnnie Dorman says:

    I somehow knew that the Mongoose Beast and the Mongoose Dolomite would be the beginnings of something big for Mongoose bikes. I own both the Beast and the Dolomite. First off, the Dolomite was geared way too high and everyone complained about it. Mongoose caught wind of all this and it looks like they got busy and changed up a few things, the crank assembly, for one. Right now I’m waiting for a machinist that I hired to make me a nine inch BMX crank spindle, because I wanted to convert my Dolomite’s crank system to a BMX crank system. With the way that they made the Dolomite’s crank system, it made it very difficult to change the front sprocket to a smaller size sprocket. The crank arm and the sprocket is a one piece setup. Like most things, it’s really hard to get things right the first time. The fat tire bikes are not necessarily about going fast as they are about climbing over things and traveling over tough terrain. I’m using a Shimano Mega-Range cluster in the back and I’m starting out with a 23 tooth sprocket in the front. One of the main reasons I wanted a smaller sprocket in front is because it creates more ground clearance from the bottom of the sprocket to the ground, making it easier to crawl over big rocks, logs, etc. I wanted to just have a nine inch long BMX crank spindle made for my Dolomite, but I thought I would just try cutting the longest BMX spindle I could find in half and welding a piece in-between to make it long enough. That may not work, but if it doesn’t, I will either try to get a machinist to make the crank spindle I need or I will just give up on it, sell the Dolomite, and get me the new Mongoose Argus-allo.

  • darthmarl says:

    Can the rear accomodate 4.9 tires

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