27.5 Reviews and News


2019 Specialized Stumpjumper launched


Specialized has redesigned the Stumpjumper for 2018, a bike that has been around since 1981. Did they address everything on your must have list? Read on to find out.

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  • dickachu says:

    Orbea rallon us market version with hole in down tube.

    • Cole Trickle says:

      Ok, we’re going there…can’t you say that the Rallon copied this design from the Demo, which was released a few years ago?

      • dickachu says:

        So you confirming that the specialized copied this design from Gian Giacomo Caprotti, from 1534 sketch ?

        • Will Urich says:

          I enjoyed going to the wikipedia about the history of the bicycle and learning a tiny bit just now about Gian Giacomo Caprotti, but I don’t understand what you’re talking about Specialized copying a 400 year old design? Or are you commenting that Specialized didn’t innovate enough on their own? Aren’t we all climbing up the backs and over the heads of giants of the past? Isn’t that what human innovation is? Nobody is inventing the wheel over again.

  • benito says:

    “reduced top out force” on the Command Post – thank God

  • M. says:

    Still milking that 20 year old suspension design, eh Specialized?

  • Z says:

    Bravo Specialized for finally getting rid of the proprietary BS! I’m looking forward to ridding this bike! Looks bad ass. However, two notes.

    1. Your price point range sucks. You need something between $5500 & $9500. Say a proper Sram X01 build, with a non-carbon rim set? I can only assume that the wheel set on the Expert is carbon as it’s not listed in your specs. Look at the Santa Cruz Bronson, probably your main competitor.

    2. I rode the Butcher tires for a few years. Loved’m. A proper trail bike need better rear braking traction than the purg can produce. At least put a Butcher on the back. This combo rocks.

    2a. However, the Maxxis Minion is a superior tire. Period. End of story. You’ve come this far, just do it.

  • jason says:

    Specialized crushes it again. Whether you love them or hate them, they set the bar higher than the rest. Is it still cool to hate Specialized?

  • Will Urich says:

    Shout out to ma boi Tyler Wagnor at Specialized for working on the dope team that made this bike a reality. Love you man and can’t wait to shred!

  • BC Shelby says:

    …crikey. quite the change from the 36 year old beast of the same name I still ride. Not sure I like the single small front chain ring as I use mine for commuting on Portland’s oft “trail quality” streets that would beat most standard commuter bikes (and their riders) into submission.

    • Will Urich says:

      Could you explain a bit differently what you mean about Portland’s streets being trail quality and how they’re difficult to bike on/along? Is it because they’re really steep or something?

  • Steven W. says:

    A rather ugly frame design if you ask me, imo, I preferred there 2015 models over these new ones, they looked awesome and were function, was great, so why constantly change it so drastically ? An then to make it ugly to boot :O.

  • Mark J says:

    Where is the $3000 price point bike for the ST version? For women, they have an alloy version about $3000. For men, the jump is from $1850 to $4200. It seems to me that the volume seller would be the $3000 alloy version, makes no sense at all.

    • Dobo says:

      Not sure where Mark J got his information, but there are Men’s Comp Alloy versions at same $3000 price point. That said, there are some problems with the filters on the Specialized website and some of the Alloy versions don’t show up if you filter by “Stumpjumper”.

  • Tyler says:

    What does it weigh?

  • Holmstrom says:

    I am confused by the paragraph quoted. Is this comparison from 2017 to 2018 or to 2019? Please update the article for those of us who a seriously considering this bike. “After extensive testing they arrived at a balance point, where additional material did not improve stiffness, preventing unnecessary additional weight. The end result, comparing medium 2017 Comp Carbon frame vs. 2018 Comp Carbon: 2018 is 550g lighter. The newer Comp frame now includes a carbon rear triangle, so an apples-to-apples comparison would be S-Works all carbon, which resulted in a weight reduction of about 250g versus the 2017 model.”

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2019 Specialized Stumpjumper first impressions


Mtbr spent three days shredding the trails in Ainsa, Spain, to find out if the new Specialized Stumpjumper lives up to the hype.

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  • Zoso says:

    “On the trail we noticed some squirm even running 28psi, but honestly it was less that what I’ve experienced with other 2.6 tires.”

    I’d argue it’s the rim width. Seems the industry is more or less settling on 30mm as the gold standard. Try 34 or 35mm and you’ll find the tires don’t squirm at lower psi than that (I’m the same weight as the tester btw).

  • Chris says:

    So…. Santa Cruz Hightower LT v Expert Stumpjumper?? any thoughts??

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Jamis Bikes releases new 3VO suspension platform


Jamis Bikes new 3VO design dropping at Sea Otter claims a unique instant center, center of curvature and axle path that is said to eliminate unwanted motion when pedaling.

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  • smoothmoose says:

    Interesting take on dual pivot design. New bikes don’t seem pushing the LLS geo much. But interested in hearing the ride reports.

  • Doodgehull says:

    Holy Batman of chain growth,

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>Holy Batman of chain growth,
    You have info on this? Do tell.

  • benito says:

    I’d hate to admit I’d ever buy a bike based on how it looks but these certainly seem like a big step forward aesthetically. At least compared to Jamis’s DS options over the past few years.

  • Tom says:

    Go Chris! Should be called “Speedgoat Sus” though.

  • ezE says:

    tanks for keeping 26’rs alive!

  • dave says:

    Holy cow! I had a Jamis with a single pivot and after 4 warranty rear triangles got rid of it. They couldn’t do a simple single pivot right and now they do this contraption? Good luck!

  • Bnystrom says:

    There appear to be at least 12 bearings in the linkage, plus the top and bottom shock pivots. This may be the “holy grail” of suspension design (who knows?), but how long will it last? I have nothing against Jamis, but like others above, I have one that had a rear triangle issue due to poorly aligned and installed bearings. This one has 50% more bearings, which really makes me wonder.

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Cane Creek releases 29/27.5+ HELM fork


Cane Creek Cycling Components has announced the release of the highly anticipated 29/27.5+ version of the HELM suspension fork.

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Goodyear launches new line of bicycle tires


Best known for its promotional blimps and extensive line of automotive tires, Goodyear has joined other major tire manufacturers by introducing a line of tires for the two-wheel, human-powered set.

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2018 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt debuts


Key changes to the new carbon frame are an increase in rear travel to 130mm, plus increases to stiffness and a lowering of the shock rate curve.

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  • JC says:

    Another miss by Rocky in the pricing/spec dept.
    For us Canucks lowly 30 series $4649 CAD (+ taxes) so > $5K to join the club.
    No dropper & lower end suspension.
    BCed frameset $3999 CAD pre-tax. Ouch.
    Hopefully these models will be available in ALU at some point !

  • JC says:

    Correction –

    BCed frameset $3399 CAD pre-tax. Ouch.

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New colors for Niner RIP 9, JET 9 and RLT 9


Niner is offering new internal cable guides and fresh clean colors to make life easy and a little more colorful.

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Stan’s NoTubes Baron S1 27.5 wheelset review


This well-built, high performing aluminum plus size wheelset will lighten your bike but not your wallet.

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  • gg says:

    Jordan not sure where you got that link, but the correct one is: NOTUBES.COM

  • Evan says:

    Stan’s NEO hubs are crap. Had 2 of them fail in less than a year, both with the same issue. The entire freehub assembly came loose and I couldn’t pedal; both times involved getting stranded with a long hike out. Same thing happened to 2 friends. Great rims, horrible hubs.

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Michelin Wild Enduro and Power Gravel tires launched


Mtbr spotted several exciting new tires from Michelin at Frostbike 2018, including a new enduro model and their highly anticipated Power Gravel offering.

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  • John Williams says:

    I don’t get this gravel brainwash.
    Friends decent MTB riders more XC scared of steeps, glued to ground.
    For yrs never talked tires or grip, nothing of the sort. Sorta weird.
    Now they’re 50+ yrs too much money gravel comes around perfect timing.
    Now all they talk is gravel grip this gravel width gravel gravel that non-stop.
    Multiple wheel sets tires and trading tires like hockey cards.

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2018 Specialized Enduro dream build


Ground-hugging performance, enough squish for a magic carpet-like ride and total silence. Meet our custom Specialized Enduro.

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  • Sean Duckworth says:

    Any impressions on how the Enduro rides with the Fox suspension, possibly in contrast to the Ohlins setup the factory builds come with?

    • jb says:

      Hi Sean – this originally had the Ohlins rear, which I rode for a while – but I’ve not ridden it with their fork. My issues were blowing through all of the travel with the STX22, wanting a bit more ramp-up, even at max air pressure. It was a choice of small bump versus not bottoming out vs. The X2 offers increased tunability, so covers a wider range of riding styles and rider weights, plus lets you increase the spring rate for deep travel via the volume reducers. My stock stx22 cavitated (air in the damper) within about 10 hours, which they did cover under warranty, but I swapped it out at that point. Also, I definitely like having the climb switch on this bike. I’ve heard of a few people having Ohlins tweak their stx22’s at the factory to get some more ramp-up (basically, reduce the air volume a bit to increase the spring rate for deeper travel). Unsure about any revalving possibilities though. Cheers!

      • Sean Duckworth says:

        Thanks for the response JB. That’s actually almost exactly what I was worried by with the STX22. I have an X2 on my current bike and love it, especially with how tune-able it is, especially being over 200 lbs my self. Looks like I know what to stick with. Much appreciated.

  • Justin says:

    210 lbs is not that heavy

    • jb says:

      Haha – true, yet it is heavy relative to many designers and pro riders, the ones creating the tunes and doing the development & testing.

  • tony says:

    Awesome build! I would only consider changing the dropper to a Bikeyoke Revive at 185mm drop. But only for reliability. The Revive I’m running now has been flawless, and any air that mixes with oil gets fixed by doing a Reset, which takes about 5 seconds..

    I did not know that you could change the KS dropper’s cartridge.

    • jb says:

      Thanks Tony. I’ve not tried the Revive myself but know others that have and they all recommend them. My only concern is I store the bike vertically to keep the wipers lubricated, so the dropper would be inverted and read that could require frequent bleeds. That said, I cannot speak from personal experience.

      On the KS cartridge – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4Y_pnisXfc
      Online prices are between 70 and 90.

  • LB says:

    Nice build and write up JB! I was thinking a lot of the same things you were thinking during my HTLT PUSH custom build up. Grip, reliability, stopping power due to 205 to 210lbs without gear, and fun factor!

    I went with my Thomson dropper and Wolftooth lever, but it’s only a 125mm…I could definitely used a 150mm though…but why 175mm? Seems like a lot of post! LOL

    And then on the bars…I’ve never tried 35mm bars…still on 31.8 enve dhr’s. What’s the hype on the 35mm?

    I debated long and hard on tires but just couldn’t pull the trigger on the maxxis…ended up with e13’s new single-ply setup and the DH LG-1 for a spare.

    At 210lbs did you consider a coil setup front and rear, or was the added weight not worth it to you?

  • LB says:

    P.S. great choice of BB and wheels too!

  • Vincent Edson says:

    JB,
    Curious as to why you run a 170mm crankset. Is it only to prevent rockstrikes? We are similar heights, and even my 175s feel a bit short sometimes ( think circus clown on mini trike). Infact, Ive been tempted to try some 180s just so I can put down some more power down on those pedally enduro segments.
    BTW, great seeing your contributions on MTBR!

  • Benny says:

    John,
    Are you able to slam your seat post all the way into the seat tube or is your post too long? I ride a 2017 Large Sworks Enduro and would love to run a longer post.

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2018 YT Capra first ride impressions


If the top spec’d Capra was priced at $10,400, we believe they’d still sell. But at $5200 it’s an amazing deal.

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  • C. T. says:

    I don’t agree on the E13 cassette. I have now been on the E13 cassette for two years now, on two bikes, and it is, by far, a superior option. It weighs less, and no, the 9 tooth cog does Not bind the chain even remotely so. As far as wear : my E13 cassette is the very first cassette that has actually lasted more than a single season of hard, daily usage…I have yet to replace either of my cassettes. This makes me wonder IF such jabs are done on purpose to steer people away from certain products because they are a threat to the SRAM etc. Such comments are bogus, so whoever is may be considering what cassette to go with, I can speak from first hand, long term-experience : the E13 cassette’s and range are all you will ever need, are lighter, and hold up.

  • p brig says:

    I really want to like these bikes. In fact I do (on paper) but at my body weight of 240 lbs four bar suspension was always too active and required high shock pressures.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      >>I really want to like these bikes.

      This is worth a look p brig. They control the 4-bar linkage with that middle lever that arcs the suspension to give it a pedaling platform. And these big metric rear shocks in DPX2 or X2 form will give you enough damping options to control the suspension movement.

      No guarantee but worth a look.

      Also, the lateral stiffness should be enough for your weight too.

  • Niklas DR says:

    That was a short but interesting brief there on the climbing abilities that did not really distinguish about any differences between the different builds. For example, DPX2 was said to be great for climbing. So, I guess then that the Capra 29 CF Pro is it then, as it is the only build with that shock!
    What about the climbing of the Capra 29 CF Pro Race though? I can only guess that the harder-to-set-up X2 and, the higher front, giving a more set-back saddle position with 75° instead of 76° seat tube angle, impairs climbing for the mass.
    And then again, does this mean that the 29 CF Pro Race is less for technical climbs but more for easy fire-roads up but then of course the most secure bomber going downhill of them all?
    This is my guess, reading about the bikes, shocks, etc. Please help me! Am I right or wrong ??

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2018 YT Capra released


The YT Capra is one of the most interesting bike introductions we have seen in our 20 years in the bike industry. We dub it the “perfect storm.”

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Commencal releases new META all mountain machine


Matte black anodized frame adorned with shiny black artwork; Commencal META is ultimate classy-stealth. Jump on the frame rode by Cécile Ravanel to the final EWS in Italy!

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Fezzari Cascade Peak 29 Pro first look


Built around their AT529 frame design, 130mm all-mountain bike has adjustable GA-Link geometry to keep a consistent BB height when changing between 27.5+ and 29er set-ups.

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  • RealT says:

    “…35mm stem make the Cascade Peak handle nicely on drops and jumps.” – I bet that’s essential (if mostly to inflate the price).

  • Ray S says:

    Any updates yet? Another review I read said the BB height was WAY lower than advertised.

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Canyon Torque super enduro bike launched


German direct-to-consumer seller unveils new Torque super-enduro bike, aluminum Sender DH rig, and G5, the company’s new line of gravity-focused handlebars, stems, and grips.

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Motobecane 2Hundred7 downhill bike review


True to form with Motobecane’s core values, components are where they deliver the goods. Most bikes in this price range of $2600 are upgrade ready but this one is dialed and ready to ride.

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  • Loll says:

    How did you decide to test the 7 instead of 10 speed?

    Also, looks like there are some corner cutting for cost. 31.8 handle bar and stem. That’s about a 100 bucks to upgrade to 35mm.

    • sam says:

      Many bikes are spec’d with 31.8 bar/stem. I doubt 35 really makes that much a difference, i’d hardly call that “cutting corners”

  • ron says:

    You lost me at 64 deg HA. LOL!

    And

    “It looks like a KHS.”

    • Barry says:

      ron, I’m pretty curious what you think’s funny about 64 deg HTA. That’s a fairly play-it-safe number for this bike, and within 1 degree of most it’s competitors. As mentioned in the review, you shouldn’t expect bikesdirect to push industry standards. And yeah, many of their Al frames are KHS knock-offs (from the same factory).

  • Phil Esra says:

    Nice, you don’t see bikesdirect bikes reviewed much, and I always wonder what they’re all about.

  • Sean says:

    “All the checkboxes are addressed well with no shortcuts on this bike.”
    Do you always ride without a dropper post? I consider that absolutely integral to any bike. YT’s mostly if not always come with one, so yeah, the spec on this is not up to par.

    • LJ says:

      Sean this is a downhill bike, which are almost never spec’d with dropper posts – look at the YT Tues – none of them come with dropper posts – it would typically be a waste to put a dropper on a bike that is only designed to go in 1 direction – downhill – that is why it is called a “downhill” bike

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2018 Canyon Spectral unveiled


The 2018 Canyon Spectral features a new shock orientation, boost hub spacing, room for larger tires, and a host of other unique design changes.

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  • Name says:

    Its great to see that Canyon has embraced updating the Spectral. What I cannot understand is why the 9.0 Pro, that fits the largest market share IMO, would shackle the buyer into a narrower wheel set. Every other model come with 30mm rims and 2.6in tires. This just seems like a huge miss-step

    • Gustav says:

      I am completely baffled by this as well. I would have ordered the 9.0 pro if it had the wider rims, but as it stands I will be getting the lower end CF 8.0. I will be missing out on top end suspension and some carbon goodies, but will get the stiffer fork (compared to fox 34) and wide rims that I need. It seems such a strange choice to go with 25mm rims on the RS 9.0 model.

  • shawn says:

    Just to point out, this is not Horst link suspension. A key part of the old Horst link patent was that the chain stay pivot was below the rear axle. This one is above the rear axle. It is actually a ‘Smooth link’ suspension (AKA Rocky Mountain’s suspension that avoided the Horst link patent that was on all of their bikes until recently when they switched to cartridge bearing pivots and true Horst links after the patent expired). They still use it on the Thunderbolt.

    • smoothmoose says:

      Curious, but placing the chainstay pivot above or below the real axle, does that have any dramatic change on the kinematics? Intuitively, I don’t think so. Linkage back to the front triangle and shock placement would have a much larger impact.

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Cannondale Jekyll 2 review


Cannondale has always appealed to a niche audience thanks to use of unique technology. On this bike though, they’ve delivered exactly what enduro-minded riders want.

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  • Kevin Hill says:

    Can anyone speak to the Editors Note about the running change from Float X EVOL to DPX2?

    Cannondale website (as of 4/27/18) still shows Float X EVOL as spec. I read this review a while ago, but assumed it was just a mistake since no other reviews spoke of it and neither did any Cannondale info. However, today I was listening to an older MTBPodcast (Episode #46 from 2/22/18), and at 1:05:57 in the episode they say the same thing – that Cannondale “just switched over; they had a rolling change in production over to the new DPX2…” What gives?

  • Kevin Hill says:

    I got the official word from Cannondale on the Float X – DPX2 question I posted above. It is true. Cannondale is making a rolling change; however, the only way to guarantee a DPX2 is what arrives for you, is to wait for Model Year 2019 bikes.

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Bulls Bike E-Stream review


The biggest battery available and a capable full-suspension platform make this e-bike truly adventure ready.

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  • gg says:

    “AA: Optimal riding conditions is smooth pavement terrain, max tire pressure, no headwinds, and a fairly light rider.”

    What the heck ?

    Pavement “terrain” ? Max tire pressure ? Everything an MTB is NOT !

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      Correct gg. Since they started with commuter e-bikes, they’re using those formulas. We’re hoping they’ll switch to more realistic mountain bike conditions formula soon, albeit more difficult to standardize.

  • jack says:

    Although I have no desire to own an e-bike, I do think it’s a great option for older folks who need the assist and allows them to ride.

  • gg says:

    Francis thanks for clarifying that.
    May also explain why the brand manager is defending the thin tires !

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>May also explain why the brand manager is defending the thin tires!

    Yes, I think they’re learning about the spec nuances as they build more of these types of bikes. One of my pet peeves is many manufacturers specify Plus tires for grip and control but then they spec Rocket Ron tires with no knobs (to combat weight and speed concerns).

    Anyway, I mostly rode this bike with 2.8 Maxxis Minions in the front.

  • peter says:

    I too had disdain with ebikes until I had the pleasure of testing one out this year. Wow, Very impressed. I still had to put in the effort and in no way should it be compared to a motorcycle. I predict in a few years they will get the battery size down to make ebikes indistinguishable from regular mountain bikes. and you can count on most folks will go for some type of pedal assist, to have that little umph when they might need it. The bulls bike e stream is a nice looking bike and on the trail most people would have to take a good look to recognize its an ebike. Bottom line is I am all for innovation and opening the doors to allow more folks into our sport.

  • TacoBeer says:

    This has no value to be on MTBR, this is a Mountain mo-ped and belongs on a vehicle/motor type site. Ban e-bike on single track! they should only have reviews on dirt roads or streets where they belong.

  • Brad says:

    The excuse about I am old, I am heavy, I am new, is crap. You either want to ride or you don’t. We have all been new, or out of shape, and we are all growing older. I used to run 7 minute miles on half marathons, I can’t anymore, so do I need battery powered shoes, nope. Our land access is fragile and these bikes are a complete threat to it. This article is complete b.s. on why it will help you ride longer rides and do-once trails can be ridden everyday – I can’t do that on my current bike? Thanks for rolling over… A bicycle is already one of the most efficient machines. On another note, these bikes are officially worse for the environment compared to what we already have. You have to recharge a human powered vehicle???? Then what – in 10 years you have to trash the bike as the batteries are bad and the new batteries don’t work with this bike or the motor die’s? Currently older bikes are easily reused as commuters, or pass me downs. I am disappointed on so many levels…

  • JB] says:

    I am 71 years old and just want to keep riding. I cannot fathom the negativity when all these bikes have is assist used mainly in climbing and achieving greater distances. I am surely not racing anyone down hill. The aggressive riders can tear up trail on any bike, E or otherwise. Seems to me the biggest problem is ego related. Not right that at 71 I might pass your ass going up hill! Get real and let people live!

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Trek Roscoe and X-Caliber hardtails reviewed


Trek’s budget-friendly hardtails have evolved on two distinct paths, an affordable XC steed and a fun trail machine. Born out of the same frame, find out how these two bikes compare.

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  • jc says:

    Some goofy geometry info listed, if indeed they’re the same frame. No way that adding 2cm of travel to the fork will change the seat tube angle by more than 1 full degree – even on the smallest size frame.

  • brian tunney says:

    I’m not a strong enough enthusiast to know a lot about bikes and handling etc…. so I like a bit of the feedback to how the subtle differences can make almost the same bike one format versus the other.

    I’m most impressed with the specs and comments on these as compared to my trail oriented bikepacker or adventure bike, steel, 1×11, Recon, Schwalbe and coming in a shade over 30# at $1199 new, a few months ago.

  • Jon Dahl says:

    I’m thinking about the rear hub “boost” 9*141 ??? Where in the aftermarket can you buy a new rear wheel if it gets broken. Why go back to QR when thru Axel has come to stay…. sad.

  • Bret says:

    Was really tempted by the Roscoe 8…solid build for the price. Ended up stretching the budget a tad more and got Diamondback Release 1…I’m so glad I went full squish.

  • Gordon says:

    I’m somewhere between XC and novice trail. I like long days out in the British country side but also like to dick around on the trails. Does the Rosco also work well on the road as well as the trail? I like the idea of having the dropper post and bigger tyres but suspect this combine with the 1×11 would make it really difficult on a long day out. What are you thoughts?

    • John Mac says:

      Gordon, I’ve got the Roscoe 9 (which is available in the UK) as my do-it-all bike. It handles roads fine albeit not at the pace that a 2-by bike could due to gearing, but where it shines is on climbs with some proper granny gears that help your legs keep churning. The plus size tyres (2.8″ rather than 3.0″ mentioned in the article) also eliminate any concerns over drain grid gaps (the enemy of skinnier hybrid/roadie tyres) and roll over most things with ease. Speaking of roll over, given the plus size tyres, some will say that they roll like 29ers rather than 27.5, but all I can say is that I have not had one single bad ride or found fault with the bike at all so far.

  • Izzy M says:

    The Trek website lists the X-Caliber’s BB as being lower than the Roscoe’s. So the statement about trail hardtails being lower than their XC counterparts isn’t correct in this case.

  • Izzy M says:

    Just found this on the Q&A portion of the X-Caliber on the Trek website:

    Can you swap wheels between 29 and 27.5 plus like on the roscoe models? What is the maximum tire witdh.
    Verified Reply – Luke @ Trek
    No, this is not recommended. The tires will not fit in the frames that already use 27.5″ tires. The 29er X-caliber has less fork travel than the Roscoe which will make the bottom bracket height too low for ideal riding performance if the X-caliber were to use 27.5+ wheels. 2.4″ tires are the maximum recommended tire width for both the 27.5 and 29er X-caliber bikes.

    So apparently, the X-Caliber and Roscoe frames are not the same frame.

    • tom says:

      yes you can swap wheel sizes the boost 141 is the same as 148 but with quick release
      trek has wheel sets ready to go

  • Ricardo Torrado. says:

    Me hice a la roscoe 8, y es destacada su respuesta en caminos difíciles y descensos pedregosos. La supensión es poderosa y la transmisión suave y fiable. La estética es impresionante, generando comentarios de los compañeros de ruta. El precio es mucho menor al de la competencia, y destaca en componentes frente a esta.

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DVO Diamond 110 Boost fork review


It’s not the lightest fork in this class, but the DVO Diamond 110 Boost is bar none one of the best trail/enduro forks we’ve ridden in a long time. Find out why.

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  • Dirt Doyen says:

    Bar None the best fork, shock and seat post I have ridden to date. Ellsworth Epiphany DVO Boost 110 27.5 front, Topaz Rear and Garnet seatpost. THIS COMPANY GETS IT I have called several times with questions on tune and service Ronny has been right there with easy answers and there website is great with DVO rider connect, tuning and service videos and great support. Coming from the big 2 over the last 30 years this has been a breath of fresh air actually getting service instead of send it to us and everything we do is 200.00 or more and 2 to 4 weeks of not riding . My LBS tries their best but they cannot get past it either. The small weight penalty is nothing compared to the serviceability. I have been running this setup since June 4 to 8 hours a week and had no issues at all…Love em so far.

  • bigcol says:

    How funny is it that we are going back to 110 spacing. Up next, 110×20!

  • JP says:

    I appreciate your review. Given that fork reviews are so subjective, it would be nice if suspension reviews start including data that supports the claims of small bump sensitivity and mid-stroke support. I’d rather a fork be hooked up to a machine that showed the characteristics than read a subjective impression of the fork’s properties. It is really a problem with all fork reviews and since often we cannot try a fork before buying it, the more objective the data…the better we could make decisions. Perhaps one of the best fork reviews/comparisons I have read is this one… http://enduro-mtb.com/en/best-160-mm-mtb-fork-can-buy/2/ and the DVO was well rated in that one.

    • keith says:

      This is true for everything in the bike industry. So much marketing-speak and pseudo science. Power transfer, mid-stroke “support”, wallow – what the hell is any of that psycho babble?

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Cane Creek now Coil Creek?


Cane Creek Cycling Components has temporarily changed their name to Coil Creek for the month of November to coincide with the release of the HELM Coil 27.5 suspension fork.

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Rocky Mountain Instinct and Pipeline first impressions


Two-day test session in Fruita, Colorado, aboard revised 29er and 27.5+ options from North Vancouver-based bike maker.

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Diamondback Release Carbon 5C review


This fun, efficient, and highly capable 27.5 trail bike delivers going up and down and can be had at a very competitive price.

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  • jared S says:

    29er is great, as long as they make it plus compatible. 29 plus, 27plus, whatever, just make it so that it can handle up to 3.0 tires! Please. The suspension travel also needs to stay the same. 150mm up front ! and 130-140mm in the rear.

  • onesojourner says:

    I can attest to the ease of putting these bikes together. It took me 30 minutes and the includes setting sag.

    The bottle cage is also my biggest gripe. IS anyone aware of any other way to attach a bottle to this bike? I think the frame could handle a short bottle in the frame with some sort of strap on bottle cage.

    • Jason VH says:

      Bottle cage is also a deal breaker for me as well. I am scratching my head on this one, even a small bottle like the YT would be better than nothing.

      It’s too bad, I really like what they have going with this bike, I’d totally consider it otherwise.

  • eastcoastpally says:

    “Not as stable at speed as 29er trail bike”-Seems odd to list this as a minus…it’s a review not a wheel size debate.

  • Jeremy Moen says:

    If a person wanted this platform with 29″ wheels, just get the catch 2 (a 27.5+ bike), stroke the fork up to 150mm like many of us do (about $30 in parts) to slacken the head angle, add a set of 29″ wheels and there you go. Some guys have tried it and went back to 27.5+ due to traction / comfort, so to me the Catch is the sweet spot if you want the taller tires for rollover. DB even includes the valves and all to go tubeless for no cost other than sealant, and you can mix some yourself easy enough for cheap. That saves some substantial weight on the 27.5+ platform.

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Ibis Mojo HD4 review (updated)


The much-loved enduro-slaying Ibis Mojo HD3 has gotten a makeover for 2017. Now appropriately dubbed the Mojo HD4, the just released rig is even slacker — and more capable — than before.

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  • mikerotch says:

    money does buy happiness. now where do i get $8k?

  • b0bg says:

    I’ve been on this bike for about a month now and am definitely in love. This bike climbs as well as my 4yr old Tracer275, weighs less, and is substantially more composed in rocky, rowdy descents. Supremely happy with this bike in the rocky dusty norcal summer trails.

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