29er Reviews and News


Pivot Trail 429 first ride


120/130mm travel has been blended with new geometry to deliver a bike can conquer technical terrain while still providing speed and excitement for even docile, local trails.

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  • Teleken says:

    6.4 pound frame? Holy hernia Batman.

  • Dave says:

    Still no frames!! Why?

  • John Peltier says:

    I was thinking the same thing. Seems journalism experience may no longer be needed. And no editors any help either. How about elaborating a little on why DI2 is no longer incorporated (because it failed miserably) when you bring it up and hint you can drill the frame out if you want (can you say warranty issues???). How about talking about why anyone would want SuperBoost on their new $5000 bike. A all-around terrible article!

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Mondraker Foxy Carbon 29 unveiled


Following the introduction of the Foxy Carbon in 2018, Mondraker’s most popular model now welcomes a 29er sibling.

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Diamondback Sync’r Carbon coming soon


Count Diamondback among the bike makers embracing the “playful” hardtail market. Coming later this summer is the new Sync’r Carbon with a 66-degree headtube angle.

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  • Loll says:

    How about a short travel FS version too? And I am not referring to just the recoil, release or catch.

    Short travel, just enough to take the bad landing, but still at heart a bike to mess around and launch off things on.

    • Bret says:

      You really don’t think the Release falls into that category? I mean I suppose a 130 front 110 rear would be a cool bike from Diamondback, but the Release is plenty playful imo.

  • josh says:

    2005 is calling. They want their “short chainstays” back. I’m not saying it won’t be fun to ride, but these stays ain’t short.

  • Contrarian says:

    If this could fit 29×2.6 or 275×3.25, I’d be all over it as a bikepacking rig. Unfortunately these days, we’re back to ever-shrinking tire clearances, and it will likely fit 275×2.8 and 29×2.3. Otherwise, looks fun. Yea, not the shortest chainstays, but should be great as a more aggressive XC/TR machine.

  • big_slacker says:

    Dope! Now it needs swappable SS dropouts, I’ll trade in my Pivot Les for one of these since it’s the same idea with more aggressive geo.

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Mongoose has bikes for all disciplines and budgets


Well spec’d cross country, enduro, and downhill builds come in at under $3000.

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  • jim says:

    Mongoose has made some decent bikes every now and then, but their only consistency has been the low-end, – too bad. These look decent, I wonder where they will be assembled & sold?, hopefully at a store that can point the brake levers in the right general direction.

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Maxxis Assegai tire delivers big traction


Maxxis has collaborated with downhill racing legend Greg Minnaar to create a new high traction tire.

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Panaracer Romero all-mountain tire on way


Dominating gravel tires in recent years, Panaracer is using their rubber technology knowledge to develop a new all-mountain tire.

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Bold Unplugged prototype hides rear shock


Features include 160mm of rear travel, and adjustable chainstay length, bottom bracket height, and headtube angle via flip chips. Check out this video to learn more about this very intriguing bike.

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Commencal Meta 29er teased at Sea Otter


This trail tamer has 170/160mm front/rear travel, a 65.5-degree headtube angle, 75-degree seat tube angle, and 432mm chainstays.

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Whyte Bikes S-150C RS aggressive trail bike – video


The 2018 Whyte S-150C RS is an aggressive trail bike with the ability to switch between 29er and 27.5+ wheels.

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FSA K-Force Light WideR 25 carbon wheels launched


FSA (aka Full Speed Ahead) is moving full steam ahead with two new XC-focused mountain bike wheels, plus something unofficial and wider.

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Kona Process 153 goes full carbon


Kona took some of their best alloy bikes and created carbon versions that were on display at the Sea Otter Classic.

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Intense M29 FRO special edition DH race bike


Only 15 of these For Racing Only models will be sold. They are equipped with the same spec as the Intense Factory Racing M29.

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Pole Bicycles Machine 29er is functional work of art


The Machine is a 180mm front/160mm rear travel 29er with a 63.9-degree headtube angle and extremely steep 78-degree seat tube angle. Chainstays can accommodate up to a 3.0 tire.

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  • Sasha Kandakov says:

    Beautiful bikes, but “canceling their carbon frame making plans due to the environmental impact” sounds quite hypocritical unless they make the whole bike out of bamboo. It’s obvious that eventually even entry level bike frames will be made of carbon… just because it’ll be ridiculously cheap and it’s more durable that alu alloys. Metal will always have fans in the bike industry though. I love my Al-Sc frame and it feels better than a carbon frame with identical geometry.

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Norco Aurum HSP downhill bike launched


Norco has launched the Aurum HSP, a full composite 200mm travel downhill rig with a high single pivot design available in both 27.5 and 29er wheel sizes.

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Pivot Switchblade Aluminum launched


Pivot has debuted a more affordable aluminum version of its Switchblade trail bike that brings the same innovative geometry, suspension, and on-trail performance to a wider audience.

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Fezzari Signal Peak bridges XC-trail gap


Fezzari’s new Signal Peak artfully blends speed and fun. It’s fast on technical terrain, drops, and rock gardens, and climbs like a mountain goat.

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BMC enters e-bike market with AMP Trailfox and Speedfox


Trailfox AMP and Speedfox AMP designed to conquer everything from challenging climbs to swooping singletrack descents.

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  • Bob says:

    “Like them or not e-bikes are here and they are improving every year. ”

    Great! They can stay in Europe where they won’t cause unnecessary trail access issues for cyclists. (people who choose to not ride mopeds).

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2019 Specialized Stumpjumper launched


Specialized has redesigned the Stumpjumper for 2018, a bike that has been around since 1981. Did they address everything on your must have list? Read on to find out.

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  • dickachu says:

    Orbea rallon us market version with hole in down tube.

    • Cole Trickle says:

      Ok, we’re going there…can’t you say that the Rallon copied this design from the Demo, which was released a few years ago?

      • dickachu says:

        So you confirming that the specialized copied this design from Gian Giacomo Caprotti, from 1534 sketch ?

        • Will Urich says:

          I enjoyed going to the wikipedia about the history of the bicycle and learning a tiny bit just now about Gian Giacomo Caprotti, but I don’t understand what you’re talking about Specialized copying a 400 year old design? Or are you commenting that Specialized didn’t innovate enough on their own? Aren’t we all climbing up the backs and over the heads of giants of the past? Isn’t that what human innovation is? Nobody is inventing the wheel over again.

  • benito says:

    “reduced top out force” on the Command Post – thank God

  • M. says:

    Still milking that 20 year old suspension design, eh Specialized?

  • Z says:

    Bravo Specialized for finally getting rid of the proprietary BS! I’m looking forward to ridding this bike! Looks bad ass. However, two notes.

    1. Your price point range sucks. You need something between $5500 & $9500. Say a proper Sram X01 build, with a non-carbon rim set? I can only assume that the wheel set on the Expert is carbon as it’s not listed in your specs. Look at the Santa Cruz Bronson, probably your main competitor.

    2. I rode the Butcher tires for a few years. Loved’m. A proper trail bike need better rear braking traction than the purg can produce. At least put a Butcher on the back. This combo rocks.

    2a. However, the Maxxis Minion is a superior tire. Period. End of story. You’ve come this far, just do it.

  • jason says:

    Specialized crushes it again. Whether you love them or hate them, they set the bar higher than the rest. Is it still cool to hate Specialized?

  • Will Urich says:

    Shout out to ma boi Tyler Wagnor at Specialized for working on the dope team that made this bike a reality. Love you man and can’t wait to shred!

  • BC Shelby says:

    …crikey. quite the change from the 36 year old beast of the same name I still ride. Not sure I like the single small front chain ring as I use mine for commuting on Portland’s oft “trail quality” streets that would beat most standard commuter bikes (and their riders) into submission.

    • Will Urich says:

      Could you explain a bit differently what you mean about Portland’s streets being trail quality and how they’re difficult to bike on/along? Is it because they’re really steep or something?

  • Steven W. says:

    A rather ugly frame design if you ask me, imo, I preferred there 2015 models over these new ones, they looked awesome and were function, was great, so why constantly change it so drastically ? An then to make it ugly to boot :O.

  • Mark J says:

    Where is the $3000 price point bike for the ST version? For women, they have an alloy version about $3000. For men, the jump is from $1850 to $4200. It seems to me that the volume seller would be the $3000 alloy version, makes no sense at all.

    • Dobo says:

      Not sure where Mark J got his information, but there are Men’s Comp Alloy versions at same $3000 price point. That said, there are some problems with the filters on the Specialized website and some of the Alloy versions don’t show up if you filter by “Stumpjumper”.

  • Tyler says:

    What does it weigh?

  • Holmstrom says:

    I am confused by the paragraph quoted. Is this comparison from 2017 to 2018 or to 2019? Please update the article for those of us who a seriously considering this bike. “After extensive testing they arrived at a balance point, where additional material did not improve stiffness, preventing unnecessary additional weight. The end result, comparing medium 2017 Comp Carbon frame vs. 2018 Comp Carbon: 2018 is 550g lighter. The newer Comp frame now includes a carbon rear triangle, so an apples-to-apples comparison would be S-Works all carbon, which resulted in a weight reduction of about 250g versus the 2017 model.”

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2019 Specialized Stumpjumper first impressions


Mtbr spent three days shredding the trails in Ainsa, Spain, to find out if the new Specialized Stumpjumper lives up to the hype.

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  • Zoso says:

    “On the trail we noticed some squirm even running 28psi, but honestly it was less that what I’ve experienced with other 2.6 tires.”

    I’d argue it’s the rim width. Seems the industry is more or less settling on 30mm as the gold standard. Try 34 or 35mm and you’ll find the tires don’t squirm at lower psi than that (I’m the same weight as the tester btw).

  • Chris says:

    So…. Santa Cruz Hightower LT v Expert Stumpjumper?? any thoughts??

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Jamis Bikes releases new 3VO suspension platform


Jamis Bikes new 3VO design dropping at Sea Otter claims a unique instant center, center of curvature and axle path that is said to eliminate unwanted motion when pedaling.

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  • smoothmoose says:

    Interesting take on dual pivot design. New bikes don’t seem pushing the LLS geo much. But interested in hearing the ride reports.

  • Doodgehull says:

    Holy Batman of chain growth,

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>Holy Batman of chain growth,
    You have info on this? Do tell.

  • benito says:

    I’d hate to admit I’d ever buy a bike based on how it looks but these certainly seem like a big step forward aesthetically. At least compared to Jamis’s DS options over the past few years.

  • Tom says:

    Go Chris! Should be called “Speedgoat Sus” though.

  • ezE says:

    tanks for keeping 26’rs alive!

  • dave says:

    Holy cow! I had a Jamis with a single pivot and after 4 warranty rear triangles got rid of it. They couldn’t do a simple single pivot right and now they do this contraption? Good luck!

  • Bnystrom says:

    There appear to be at least 12 bearings in the linkage, plus the top and bottom shock pivots. This may be the “holy grail” of suspension design (who knows?), but how long will it last? I have nothing against Jamis, but like others above, I have one that had a rear triangle issue due to poorly aligned and installed bearings. This one has 50% more bearings, which really makes me wonder.

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Yeti cycles releases trail capable and raceable SB100


Yeti’s new SB100 obscures the line between XC and Trail, utilizing a new Switch Infinity Mechanism repositioned and optimized specifically for this shorter-travel twenty-nine-inch wheel bike.

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  • dickachu says:

    too heavy for xc to short travel for trail what it is? and way overpriced.
    Just go for intense 1k cheaper, lighter and better components.

    Btw is frame cracking and infinity problems fixed?

    • benito says:

      I’ve always heard about the Yeti’s supposedly being prone to cracking, especially after harshly bottoming out…is there any data out there that has metrics on various brands and their carbon frame durability? It can be hard to separate rumor from reality.

      And what problems specifically have folks seen with Switch Infinity?

  • dickachupachu says:

    Just cuz ur too fat n too short, doesn’t mean you should rain on Yeti parade. The bike won’t make you fast, you will make you fat…errr fast

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Cane Creek releases 29/27.5+ HELM fork


Cane Creek Cycling Components has announced the release of the highly anticipated 29/27.5+ version of the HELM suspension fork.

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Goodyear launches new line of bicycle tires


Best known for its promotional blimps and extensive line of automotive tires, Goodyear has joined other major tire manufacturers by introducing a line of tires for the two-wheel, human-powered set.

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Trek Full Stache first look


Trek has unveiled a new trail bike with 130mm of front and rear travel and other unique design elements that take the capability of 29-plus tires to the next level.

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  • guysmiley says:

    elevated cs and + tires are here to stay cause it works.

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    What I like about the Full Stache.

    Pike fork.
    Eagle drivetrain.
    i36 rims which will reasonably accept 2.4-3.0 tires.
    Flip chip raises bottom bracket and also makes it possible to use 2.4-3.0 tires.
    Full Stache is very similar to the excellent 29 Fuel EX but might make the 29 Fuel EX obsolete – especially if you prefer 2.4 or wider tires.

    What I would do differently.

    It would have preferred that this bike came with 2.8 tires. Bontrager please release a 29×2.8 tire
    I would have preferred that this bike came with a longer top tube and a slacker head tube angle.
    I would have preferred if this bike came with a 140mm fork.
    I would have preferred that this bike have a different name. What the heck is a Stache?

  • benito says:

    love the look of the bike. after a couple years now riding many of the wheel/tire size variants out there, I’m not sold on 29+ as an everyday trail bike. But billing this bike as a trail-friendly back country explorer seems right on the mark. I bet it’s a ton of fun.

  • Ben says:

    I was lucky to find a Full Stache at the Trek Superstore in San Diego, great service, twenty hour trip to get the bike, but it was nice to walk on the beach in 80deg weather and shred some trails on the way home.

    Overall I really like the Full Stache, it’s way more capable than the short travel suspension would suggest. The Knockblock is not my fav, but I can deal with it. I’ve been running in the low suspension setting, steering is a tad heavy but that’s to be expected with the large wheels and long front to center.

    Improvements: Shorter stem, 60mm stock is way to long, I’d spec a 50mm and have the shorter and longer options available in house to swap; Trek is out of 50mm and 35mm Line stems which is a problem with the exclusive Knock Block system.

    Shorter cranks, stock on the large frame is 175mm, I’m getting 165mm, but 170mm would make more sense out of the box on a bike with a low bb that is meant for exploring.

    More fork travel, 130mm is okay for an XC bike but the Full Stache is made for going downhill, so I’d spec 140mm; I’ll be upgrading mine soon. I’d also be curious about a reduced offset fork.

    Weight, yeah, the Full Stache is hefty, 34# solid, much of the weight seems to be in the backend. I’d like to see them stay with an aluminum triangle and go with a carbon swingarm, avoiding the price tag of full carbon but dropping weight where it matters.

    Wheels are nice, but the rear hub really needs to be built to last. I’m running custom DT 350/Duroc 40 wheels which improved ride and reduced flex to nil. Reports of frame flex are greatly exaggerated, at 200# with hard riding habits, I don’t notice any flex; it is an 8# frame, how could it be flexy?

    Dropper length, well, I have the inseam for a 175mm, so that’s probably where I’ll go though the Bonty 150mm dropper is functional if you can overlook the awkward lever angle.

    For the price, it’s a solid package. Good on Trek to build on the success of the Stache.

    Hey Trek, what’s with the color scheme, seriously?! That said, it’s a much better looking bike in person, I trimmed mine out with varying shades or green and yellow.

  • Ben says:

    Stache, as in mustache, so a Full Stache is play on words…

    Watch the Trek Video, check out the announcers stache 😉

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Video: Jeff Kendall-Weed shreds on the new Ibis Ripmo


Watch Jeff Kendall-Weed shred Los Angeles and the San Gabriel range on his new Ibis Ripmo long travel 29er.

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