Company Spotlight


Marin’s SplitRock Tap & Wheel: A new breed of bike shop


Is it a bike shop? A brew pub? A dealership? A ride meeting spot? A hangout? At the SplitRock Tap & Wheel in Marin County, California, they say it’s all of the above – and more.

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Innovate or Die: Inside Specialized world HQ


Specialized opened their doors to a gaggle of journalists, including Mtbr, to show off the massive investments they’ve made in R&D and innovation.

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  • RP says:

    Love that saying considering how many times they sit on the sideline and wait.

    Remember what they said about 650B. LOL

    • CWN says:

      I do, and they were 100% right. Just look at the market now.

      Big S seems to always be a few steps ahead. When everyone was talking 650B they said 29″ was really where we would all end up. Now look how may companies are scrambling to get a 29″ trail and enduro bike to market while the Stumpjumper and Enduro have been killing it for years.

  • dickachu says:

    More like ”rip off or die”
    Its OK to rip, if its done by S and not ok other way.

    • Will Urich says:

      How come you really dislike S so much man? I’ve got two used Specialized bikes, a 2002 Allez Elite roadie and a 2016 29r enduro fattie, I both really enjoy riding, maintaining, looking at and talking about both of those bikes. Maybe I’m not as invested in this market as you are? Do you work in bicycle design?

      • Warwick says:

        Google “Specialized bicycles court case” and see if you don’t change your mind about them.

        • Will Urich says:

          The main court cases I found were a douchey case in Canada against a man his Cafe Roubaix cycle shop and another case against volagi that looks like it was settled for $1 in damages…..You and that dude dickachu make it sound like they were putting lead paint on their bikes. IN the spectrum of things, yes I don’t like bigger companies pushing little companies around and lawyers greedily grabbing as much money and protections as they can, but on another hand, I’m not a specialized Fanboy to begin with, I just got deals on their bikes and they make good bikes.

      • myke says:

        They are not original thinkers on actual innovation. there a companies that take cues from one another but S is will straight up will steal a design and call it their own. this is certainly true with their accessories. they have been caught doing the same with frame designs.

        Then you look at the way they interact with shops and their competitors. it is more like muscling people out of the way even when they know they are wrong. it is not a brand worth supporting if you ask me.

  • dickachupachu says:

    Haters will Hate. Spesh forges on and ups the competition. Their high-end bikes are usually exquisite. Keep hating, I’ll keep buying. Yeah, Apple, Google, Amazon are all a bunch of softball players?!? No! Big biz gets ruffles your petite feathers, man up cupcakes.

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Niner purchase by UWHK Limited complete


Pledging full customer support and “accelerated global expansion,” Niner Bikes has announced the completion of its purchase by UWHK Limited.

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  • SeventeenSeventySix says:

    Coming soon to a Wally World near you – the Huffy Iron Peak with CVA suspension!

    On a serious note, good to see them survive, it could have been R.I.P 9er. In the beginning they were ahead of the curve on a number of different levels.

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Deep dive into SRAM’s new DUB system


Lighter than the Race Face Next SL and compatible with all major bottom bracket shell sizes, SRAM’s DUB crank system is worth a closer look.

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  • dan says:

    So it’s like the Praxis crank/bb system?

  • I'mRight says:

    Can we solve bigger issues now like: rusty stem cap bolts?

  • adaycj says:

    Ah, so it fits with every BB so they can sell them to whomever, but 24mm wasn’t stiff enough, 30mm was too big. The market here is already an epic cluster, so what is another 370 part numbers?

    SRAMhas done a pretty good job of holding a large portion of the market for new 1X stuff. This “it fits almost any” BB without making a warranty mess just solidifies it. Not that anyone else will care, its not like its upgrade worthy.

  • Chris says:

    No 165mm? No sale.

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Kenda opens bicycle tire test track at Ohio R&D facility


Kenda’s new testing facility in Ohio took inspiration from the Sea Otter Classic XC course, and allows for a controlled environment and consistent, repeatable tire testing.

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Industry Nine factory tour video


Since the company’s first wheels hit the ground in 2004, it has been continually innovating every process involved, be it at the drawing board, in machine shop or on the assembly line.

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  • Lance LegStrong says:

    pretty depressing. Imagine building 10-15 wheel sets a day, 5 days a week, for life.

    I now understand from video why these wheels are so expensive. Grade 300 29″ was $1255

    My bike was the same price.

  • Dale Tennett says:

    Awesome video and shop!! Great to see these guys keep most manufacturing here in the good ole USA. They need some twin turret twin spindle Nakamura’s though!!

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How to build a better mountain biker


Come along as this newbie rider takes a daylong skills clinic and learns what it is and what it isn’t.

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Inside line on Norco’s new women’s bikes


Norco is jumping into the women’s MTB market with a full range of bikes at multiple price points. Mtbr sat down with the brand’s marketing supervisor to learn more.

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Pivot’s Chris Cocalis talks plus, tire tech, e-bikes, and more


The Pivot front man has a reputation for obsessiveness, attention to fit and finish, and just plain getting it right. It’s put his company front and center among bike cognoscenti.

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  • chase says:

    Where is the Frankentrail article? I searched and it’s nowhere.
    My biggest issue with CF frames the lack of long, slack choices. Some aluminum ones (I’m riding one now and love it).

    • Paul says:

      Hey Chase, Chris tells me the article has not been published but it’s coming. Google should locate it once it’s up… ride on!

  • Mark says:

    What a visionary, thanks for the interview

  • dddd says:

    Very interesting what Chris said about the comparison of bicycle suspension to motorcycle suspension. The dirt bike suspensions are sophisticated and actually hold up to hard usage, but are much heavier and it sounds like some get away with quality issues. I agree that tires need more development to exploit width and pressure options, and with what he said about widths in general. Pivot has become a very popular brand here in Auburn, CA, even though not everyone feels like they can afford full suspension.

  • Mike R. says:

    Great interview ! 🙂

    I remember Chris giving a buddy and me a tour of the Titus factory in the mid-1990’s. Even then you could tell he was TRULY a meticulous person as well as being an engineer and bike geek.

    From a Titus MotoLite to my current Pivot 429’er he’s made riding mtn bikes truly enjoyable ! 🙂

  • McCool says:

    I’d take an eBike over a 29er anyday! Waiting for 26+.

  • Nick Janssen says:

    29×3 is where its at Chris. Tires aren’t too heavy. Bontrager did their homework and developed the Chupacabra 120TPI at 878.2g. I have punished one on the front for over two years and am testing one front and rear at the moment with zero sidewall tears through sharp rock gardens every week. Check out all the other 27.5plus and 29plus tire data to see that the plus bike tires don’t have to be too much heavier than other tires:
    http://www.ridealongside.com/plus-bike-data/

  • useyourbody says:

    “…stronger than Double Down casing but only 40-60 grams heavier than a 120 tpi EXO”

    The best mtb news I’ve heard all year. Esp the “going into production now” part! Probably further out than I’m hoping, but can’t wait for this game-changer to come to market.

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Can you run Maxxis Wide Trail tires on regular rims?


Are you shopping for new Maxxis tires, but not sure whether you need Wide Trail or regular width version? This interview will help clear things up.

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  • HEMIjer says:

    We need a 29×2.8 with Mid ramped fast rolling center knobs, mid transition knobs, and larger side knobs!

  • ColinL says:

    Great article and great pictures. The last picture of a standard tire on a wide rim is especially instructive. If only we could’ve had that on MTBR about 2 years ago when wide rims started their re-emergence. 🙂

  • Steve says:

    I own a Yeti SB5c with Derby rims. I put a Wide Trail DHF 2.5 on the front and absolutely love the benefits I get. However, there is no discussion here that recommends what “Wide Trail” tire to put on the rear. I was informed by Yeti customer service that the widest tire I can put on my rear rim is a 2.4. Why are there no 2.4 or other size rear WT tire offerings? Why would Maxxis spend so much time and money to produce only Wide Trail tires for the front and not the back??? Why doesn’t Maxxis recommend “Rear Specific Wide Trail Tires” on their website? In my opinion, Maxxis had made a critical error in not developing/recommending a category of rear specific Wide Trail tires. They are losing money from riders such as myself who would fall all over themselves trying to buy a rear specific Wide Trail tire.

    Can someone more knowledgeable about this subject than myself please inform me what rear tire I should buy to go with my wide Derby rim???

    • Shred says:

      Steve, Maxxis does make a rear specific WT tire in 27.5 X 2.4. It’s the DHRII, listed in the graphic above. The R in DHR is for rear, although it can still be used as a front and some people, myself included like it better than a DHF in the front. I run a DHRII front and rear and it’s great. Mine are 26 X 2.8 though.

  • Steve says:

    Shred, thanks for the update! However, I’m looking for a faster rolling tire like the Rekon in a 2.4 size. Too bad they don’t make it in that size. I’ll have to look around because nobody has yet given me an answer as to what fast rolling rear tire to put on my bike. I really want a tire that’s close to 2.4 and looks and acts like a Rekon.

    • Stu says:

      Could give a 2.35 Ikon a go. It’s very rounded profile and low even knob height means it will work well with the wider rim.

      Personally though I’d just go minion (whichever flaovour) front and rear and revel in the traction.

  • Mark says:

    It looks like the new trailbike sweet spot is going to be rims in the i30-35mm range with tires in the 2.4-2.8in range. In contrast, recent Narrowbikes have rims in the i20-25mm range and support tires in the 2.0-2.4in range. I currently own a Plusbike and I like the wider low-pressure tires. However, I think the early Plusbikes with i45mm rims and 3.0in tires is too much weight and to too much rolling resistance to make for a truly great trailbike. I’m psyched to see these new tires.

  • Mark says:

    Maybe bike tires should should now be labeled with the recommended rim width. Such as 29 x 2.6in per i35mm or 27 x 2.3in per i25mm or 26 x 4.0in per i75mm or 26 x 4.8in per i95mm. What do you think???

  • Bob says:

    It’s hilarious to read a Maxxis rep going into detail on rim width down to the millimeter when they can’t come within .25″ of their specified tire width. Meet the new 2.5″ “standard” same as the old 2.25.

  • Scott says:

    So, is 2.6 a “WT” size from Maxxis? They’re listed in that chart but they don’t have “WT” in the name. Point being, what size rims are those tires designed for?

  • gg says:

    Arrghh those tire graphics are horrible and lots of confusion as seen from the comments.
    Seriously the industry needs to stop all this snake oil salesmanship.
    Wallet is healthy, but closed for now !

  • JoelBS says:

    So we are moving back to wider rims, like the ones we had in the 90s and we thought they were not cool enough and needed slim rims. MTB has been too influenced by road biking. The same happened with snowboard and ski in the early years until the have 90-95% become a separate discipline.

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2018 Trek Fuel and Remedy with Thru Shaft


Currently thru shaft suspension technology is used at the highest levels of motorsports. But now Trek is bringing this concept to mountain bikes in their Re:aktiv with Thru Shaft line of bikes.

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  • Ennis Hudson says:

    Hello and thanks for a great article. Will either work with a 2013 Trek Fuel EX 5? Given the age of my Trek, is it worth the investment for the upgrade?

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Kicking off the Sea Otter Classic Correct


The Sea Otter Classic means a lot of different things to different cyclists, but everyone can appreciate starting out riding season with a proper little bike adventure.

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A new tire size is coming and it doesn’t suck


Plus sized erupted in popularity last year. The problem for many aggressive riders is that they didn’t hold up. Now a new tire size is coming that should split the difference between plus size and traditional tires.

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  • JCWages says:

    “Baby Fat” Awesome! Haha

  • Mark says:

    It seems to me a new mountain bike standard should be developed where bikes have internal width 30-35 mm rims, boosted hubs, and fit a broad range of tire widths from 2.4-3.0 inches. Just pick tire width depending on your conditions and personal preference. I’ve mounted everything from 1.8 to 2.4 inch wide tires on my “narrow” bikes which is a similar width range and it didn’t seem to affect the bike geometry much.

  • joseph says:

    Tire manufacturers need to stop worrying about the weight weeny crybabies and make tough durable plus tires…… if you don’t like the extra weight that comes from a aggresive trail ready plus tire……… then don’t buy one …….. stick to normal size bikes. Want a plus bike or fat bike? Deal with the weight. Now go ride.

  • jc says:

    Maxxis Rekon+ 2.8 on i35 rim is 2.63″ wide, so there you go.

  • Mark says:

    Mount a 3.0in wide tire on an i30mm (i = internal width) rim and you get a 2.8in wide tire. Mount a 2.8in wide tire on an i30mm rim and you get a 2.6in wide tire. Rule of thumb – 8mm of internal rim width change produces 0.1in of tire width change.

    • Pilot says:

      I’ve got a Specialized Camber 29er (base model) that came with 20mm wide rims. I’m not extremely pleased with the ride quality over its 2.3 wide tires. The front tire is always sliding sideways on me. It feels like there’s not enough surface area on the places I’ve been riding, especially when I’m pushing hard on climbs. So I’ve been contemplating switching to the 27.5 Plus but I don’t even know where to start and I’m not sure how much money I’d have to be spending on rims, tires, spokes, tires, plus labor for someone to do the job for me . I was really afraid of this (torn between 650b and the 29er) when I bought the bike a year ago (it was quite a bit over my budget to begin with) and now I just feel like selling the bike altogether and just buy cheaper 27.5 plus hardtail. Any ideas and opinions would be appreciated. Thank you!

  • PinkFloydLandis says:


    What’s with the rampant flats? First I’ve heard of it. I’ve put 2000 miles on my 3″ tires and have yet to flat. Same w/ my main riding partner. Article seems to give no explanation why a 2.6″ tire is fine, but on 2.8 you’ll “blow half your day patching flats.” Drop the hyperbole.

  • dddd says:

    Like the title of the article says, this “new” tire size doesn’t suck, in part because the tires are appropriately designed for current rim widths.
    And like jc says, this isn’t quite a new size, just a new designation that the tire makers will be working around with their sizing, design and marketing.
    I’ve been running the inexpensive and generously-sized Vigilante 2.3’s on my i35 rims, still gives 2.6″ width, and which works a lot better than on the i45 rims I was using.

  • Tom from RI says:

    Bought the 275 plus Stump jumper-carbon and love the bike- had nothing but problems with the Ground Control 3.0- thought the GRID was going to do the trick and the bead separated from the tire(running tubeless) have resorted to putting a tube in the rear- the front is the Purgatory and I had problems with sealant leaking through the side wall but has been fine for a while. This tire size is a work in progress- we will see how my warrantee request goes and the replacements- if not good it will be three strikes you are out…got my eye on the High Roller II and going to do some more research on tire width and relation to rim width- again knew that there were going to be some issues you cannot have such a big light tire and expect no issues. Absolutely love the bike and thinking I will end up with 2.8- I ride very aggressive technical love riding rocks- had 0 issues with the sidewall getting slashed which I have heard of- people are going to need to understand this rim width vs tire to get this the way they want it…also it is possible to just get a bad batch for those that farm out the job so that just wrecks any onesie twosie type of analysis -it could of been that one of the two of these just did not come out of the factory right- these forums are great- would love to be able to hook up my ole 26 inch trail bike with a lighter 2.5 or 2.8 if it exists-run High Roller 2.5 DH on my DH bike and 0 issues-tubeless also. These would be way to heavy for the trail.

  • dddd says:

    I should have said “…still gives [I]nearly[/I] 2.6″ width…”, and that the narrower rims did reduce sidewall-trauma issues with those tires ridden here in Auburn, CA.

  • bob says:

    how is that “new”? its 27.5+ tires…

  • meeseeks says:

    ridiculous maxxis icon+ recon+ “2.8” is no bigger than continental trail king 2,4 which coming in black chili and protection apex with same weight and twice cheaper.
    why no one asked companies who make real +size tires like WTB, Schwalbe, Duro.

    we need more sizes and also more rims for each size, don’t forget separately adventure, trail and enduro specifics tires

  • Highway Star says:

    I bought TEN 26″ tires this spring. 8x maxxis – 2.3″ to 2.5″ DHF, DHR2, Shorty, Aggressor, Minion SS. Also a pair of Schwable Nobby Nic.

    Won’t be buying any 27″ or plus tires any time soon.

  • narf narf says:

    love the 27.5 2.6″ Rocket Rons on Nox Teos. Perfec combo

  • Rodney says:

    My experience with Maxxis tires is that they are always more narrow than the tire size suggests. So is a Maxxis 2.6 really going to be a more like a normal 2.4?

  • Fo says:

    Darn and the Stan’s Flow Mk3 are 29mm inner width :-/

  • Rickets says:

    Try riding with rickets!

  • Highway Star says:

    This spring 2017 I’ve spent approximately $1000 on 26 Inch wheels and tires. A new Hadley/Flow Mk3 wheelset, and TEN 26″ tires. My bike is also all new within the last 2 years, 26″ frame and fork etc.

    I’m currently running a maxxis Shorty 26×2.5″ Front and 26×2.4″ DHR2 Rear on the Mk3’s. These are HUGE, soft rubber, GRIPPY tires, and at 875g-925g on a 460g rim, they are right on the far limit of is acceptable in weight on a trail bike. They are also not too big to feel floppy bouncy like a plus size. They roll over everything but can still be handled accurately.

    Anyone riding a 27.5″, I strongly recommend getting you hands on a 26″ wheelset with a roughly 30mm inner width, and trying a 750g-900g set of 2.4-2.5″ tires. Keep in the actual difference between 26″ and 650b (27.5″) is only an inch, and a half inch in radius. Compared to a 27.5″ with a 2.2″ tire, the 26×2.5 will be extremely close on ride height and rollover, a similar overall weight, sharper handling, stiffer, stronger, quicker, and will obviously be wider and more grippy.

  • Roger says:

    All the planned obsolescence has ruined mountain biking for me. You guys with big wallets can continue keeping up with the Jones’s. I’ll be buying used 26ers and parts.

    • Christian Ahlmann says:

      Roger, I just tuned up my 1999 Cannondale Super V with Lefty fork and 26″ wheels. Rides great. We’re on the same page ; )

  • gg says:

    Highway Star’s proposal looks interesting.
    MTBR make this happen within an El Comparo or shootout.

  • Stunnerbear says:

    I have a few bikes in the quiver and choosing the right one is just a matter of attitude. Of course choosing the right bike for the right ride does make a difference. For me time is my biggest enemy and the easier it is to set up and go, the easier it is for me to ride more. I choose carefully this year for my new bike and I got an S works Fuse and right away put 2.8 Rocket Rons in the lightest set up I could. Got the bike down to 24.5 lbs with pedals 2 cages and a multi tool. Once I got the tire pressure figured out 13.5 to 14 front and 16 to 17 rear I can now ride this bike faster than I could ever ride my 5″ full sus. trail bike of near same weight. It’s really more about your style and skill that makes what you choose right for you. I wanted a HT trail, light enduro shredder that I could send over doubles and go downhill fast. I guess what I am getting at is this tire option is way better than my 29er CX race bike and more fun than my 26er 5″ trail bike.

  • GuyOnMtb says:

    Didn’t the industry a year ago say the same thing about 30mm rims for 2.5 tires?

    The issue to “refine” fat tires into Plus tires, into Sub+ tires, to finally create the 2.6″ was a waste of energy and time. 2.5″ casings could have been refined and the tread patterns could be widened across the 2.5″ casing to create a tire with less weight then the “new 2.6 standard”.

    New standards before I can break my current standards; is merely a push to create more revenue and screw the consumer out on compatibility and longevity.

    Maybe next we can throw away the 31.8 handlebar and only have 35 bars, leaving about 3 tons of unused aluminum. Or, maybe we can make the BMX rear axle diameter a new standard on MTB?

    Know why this article didn’t have one pro-rider answering questions? Because they would have asked why we are no longer working on 30mm-35mm x 2.5″.

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Inside ENVE’s new 78,000 square foot factory


Long regarded as one of the world’s preeminent carbon wheel and component makers, Utah’s ENVE composites just got a new home. In early March the company’s 168 employees moved into a new 78,000 square foot facility.

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  • blaklabl says:

    Unfortunately, I don’t see this as a good sign for prices coming down any time soon.

  • Chris says:

    Jesus Christ. No wonder their wheels are so expensive. Holy crap. What a ripoff.
    Hopefully they take care of their employees, too.

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Fezzari launches 30-day return program


Fezzari is now allowing customer returns from consumers within 30 days. It’s a big risk that shows confidence in their product and processes.

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  • Dennis says:

    I bought a Fezzari Alta Peak last February (2016) and couldn’t be happier. I opted for the tubeless upgrade and dropper post. Of course, like many mountain bikers, I couldn’t leave it alone: Came across a deal on a Fox Float 34 Factory fork and matching Factory EVOL DPS rear shock and swapped out the stock Rock Shox Sector and Monarch pieces. Love the bike and love it even more with the upgraded suspenders.

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Tepui Tents headquarters tour


Roof Top Tents have captured the hearts and minds of 4WD enthusiasts and folks who love the outdoors. And now the market is expanding to mountain bikers who are dreaming of roaming the land and exploring the trails from camp.

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YT Industries bike packaging and unboxing


We unpack a lot of bikes and once in a while, we stumble upon one that is packed so well that it is worth noting. Here’s how YT Industries expects to withstand the torture tests of all the shipping handlers around the world.

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How Julbo sunglasses are made


Ever wonder how sunglass frames and lenses are made? We visited Julbo’s French headquarters for a closer look.

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Gallery: Inside the supremely eclectic Kona Bikes HQ


While the offices of some bike manufacturers resemble a cross between an Ikea and a mausoleum, Kona’s headquarters are steeped in history. The artwork, NWD posters, and scattered bikes gives us that same warm and fuzzy feeling as walking into our favorite bike shop.

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  • loll says:

    Working here…Okay as a bike shop, ok as an artist studio, but as an office, it feels more like a hang out place than an office that one looks forward to going. To each his/her own.

    Kona does make very cool bikes though.

  • Fadzil says:

    I just love my Kahuna ’14. I can see my next bike will continue to be a Kona and another Kona & another Kona. just awesome.

  • peper says:

    Love Kona’s bikes. I’ve had two Units and both have been spectacular on the trail. I claimed warranty on a frame that I cracked and it was a no hassle experience and took about a week with shipping and everything…KONA for life! I rode the cracked one while the new frame was in route. Would love a Honzo CR…

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Inside Julbo, France’s largest eyewear manufacturer


Julbo is an iconic mountaineering brand, but only recently started to develop products for cycling. To find out how their technology crosses over to two wheels, Mtbr visited their headquarters (and playground) in the French Alps.

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When should you replace your carbon handlebar?


Carbon parts aren’t cheap. So if you scratch your bars in a crash, do you have to replace them right away?

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  • Farmer Ted says:

    I don’t know that I’d call that ‘surface scratching’. The damage goes through the exterior gel coat and into the carbon structure to at least some degree. As financially painful as it might be, I’d probably replace that bar. It may be fine and last forever, it may not. The problem is that if it fails catastrophically lading a jump or some other big hit, you’re going down with it and there’s really no way to tell if and when it will fail beforehand.

    There are places out there that will repair carbon fiber parts but in the case of a handlebar, it may be cheaper just to buy a new one since, with a little bargain hunting, they can be had for $100-150 vs a damaged carbon frame which would cost thousands to replace.

    If you really wanted to be redneck, you could cut the bar down so that the grip clamps to the inside of the damaged area. This should put less stress on the damaged area. You’ll also be running a narrower bar that still may be compromised for strength.

    I’m to the point in my life where I’m just going to spring for the new part. It’s a lot cheaper to fix a bike than it is to fix a human. The risk of a structural part failing just isn’t worth it for me.

  • tyrebyter says:

    That’s why you buy bars from people who actually make them: Renthal.

  • Ibissess says:

    I think just about any bar should be replaced if the crash involves both brake levers being torn off & a CAT scan.

  • Matt says:

    “Since this is not true of every incident, our advice is always to replace a carbon handlebar after a crash.”

    …. Thanks?

  • steve says:

    It’s not a myth, it’s an approved method of determining delimitation. But I come from aviation, and the method typically applies to larger panels, and it’s highly subjective. On a piece so tightly constructed as a handlebar, I can’t see a tap test determining anything useful.

  • peper says:

    Most carbon bar makers will offer a crash replacement at about 1/2 cost. However fleabay carbon all bets are off.

  • mdilthey says:

    Good on Renthal for answering in such a complete way.

    If I crash hard on something, that part may see a second life on a beater commuter or cruising-around-town bike. No sense risking life and limb.

    This is also why I like steel/titanium handlebars. They’re a little more resilient to damage and won’t catastrophically fail all at once. You might get a bad bend, and that’ll tell you it’s time to go shopping.

  • Moondogg says:

    I busted a set of carbon bars landing off a small jump at high speed. They just snapped. Turns out my dropper post clamp had been crushing the carbon. This was my first carbon bars, and I bought a torque wrench so that I could be sure I was tightening all my components to spec. I think the torque settings for brake levers, dropper controls, etc. are too high for carbon bars. I replaced my bars with same model, but now I torque to just tight enough I can’t spin the component without some force.

    Following torques specs is good, but so is common sense. Avoid over tightening anything attached to your bars.

  • Greg Jetnikoff says:

    If you raqdius the bar clamps and anything clamped to them , Easton’s at least seem to last a VERY long time and crashes.
    I am using 2 sets of Easton ultralights that I bought in the very early 2000’s. Crashed MANY times. Keep using them because they are the inch centres and I hate the ridiculous harsh stiffness of bar bars. They have a bit more flex to reduce the stiffness and pounding. Getting hard to get small clamp size stems. Except for Downhill ( and now maybe Enduro) fat bars is one of the great pieces of stupidity of the MTB industry. I have a compressed verterbrae in my neck and simply cannot ride on fat bars as my left arm goes numb. When I can no longer get stems and my thin centres are gone, I will have to give up MTB.

  • Greg Jetnikoff says:

    NO edit…Above should read “stiffness of fat bars”

  • Dan says:

    Try a carbon Chromag BZA 800mm 35mm riser bar. I can watch the bar flex just pushing down on it. Hope thats just how they are made.

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Interview: Tom Morgan, president and co-owner of Ibis


Santa Cruz is home to one of densest concentrations of mountain bike companies in the world. To find out why, the iconic California city’s PR department interviewed Tom Morgan, president of Ibis Cycles, which is based there.

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  • alias says:

    It’s a pity that the lead in to this article highlights all the globally successful companies based in and around Santa Cruz, and at the same time still has to point out the fact that so much trail is illegal there.

    You would think the land managers would have realized that bikes are part of a valuable global economy which also promotes a healthy lifestyle…..yet we still have to sneak around in order to ride in some places.

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OneUp Headquarters Tour


OneUp is a small startup based in a lesser known riding area just outside of Whistler. Click through to take a short tour of their offices.

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Meet the guy bringing Orange Bikes back to the United States


After a long hiatus, Orange Bikes are now available for sale in the United States. Find out how it happened and how they’re planning to grow in our interview with their new distributor.

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CamelBak: A look inside the inventor of the hydration pack


It was 1989 when the world’s first hydration pack was born. Yet, what is truly impressive is that all these years later, CamelBak remains a leader in a category that’s helped shape and change the way we ride bikes. Take a look inside this iconic company.

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  • chris says:

    Always been a huge fan and supported the innovator for over 20 years now. Terribly disappointed in my Fourteener 24 though. Fabric is falling apart at the low back area and their warranty is a giant PITA pushback. Brand loyalty no more.

    • CamelBak Warranty Team says:

      Hi Chris,

      The warranty department at CamelBak prides itself on providing superior customer experience. We are sorry to hear your Fourteener 24 is not working properly.

      We take our consumers feedback very seriously and will work with you to ensure we deliver 100% Got Your Bak service! Please download the product return form and sent the pack so we can replace it for you.

      http://www.camelbak.com/en/GYB/Product-Replacement.aspx

      Looking forward to assist you!

      Best,

      The CamelBak warranty Team

  • Jason says:

    Resilience of graphics is about the last thing I care about but it’s funny they actually test for the resilience. I have a camelbak bottle in my office and much of the lettering is worn off just from my hands. The camelbak bottles on my bikes are even worse, there’s almost no lettering left at all.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      Jason, they must have 20 machines there that test durability. So the graphics test is just to show the extreme lengths they go through. Kind of interesting since a lot of the test machines are custom built.

  • MTBmoose says:

    Love the little side pockets on the waist straps on my new Mule NV, but the pack is HEAVY! Wish they still made the Blowfish. I think I’ve owned 4-5 of them. Still have a couple of them is various states of disrepair and use one of them on occasion when I want something about half the weight of the Mule. Camelbak owner for going on 20 years. Won’t ride without it.

  • p brig says:

    I’m the worst CamelBak customer because I’m still using the first one I bought around 1998. However I’ve purchased many bite valves since.

  • luis silva says:

    there´s nothing like a camelbak backpack

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