Components Reviews and News


RockShox updates to 2019 SID platform and releases TwistLoc lockout


Updated RockShox SID is ready to race; updated DebonAir spring, Charger 2 damper and sculpted magnesium dropouts. Plus TwistLoc for more barspace and response.

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Riding Scott’s TwinLoc Remote Suspension System


Video takes a look into the world of suspension settings, adjustable geometry, frequency of use, and ultimately how that all translates to the ride.

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Salsa Salt Flat carbon flat bar review


The Salsa Salt Flat carbon bar is a solid option for those looking to shed some bike weight.

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FOX Factory Tuning custom program unveiled


The new FOX Factory Tuning program is designed to provide customers with the best possible product for their individual needs.

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RockShox updates Deluxe, Super Deluxe, Lyrik and more


RockShox has overhauled the Sektor, Reba, Recon, Judy, 30, Bluto, Pike DJ, Lyrik and Yari suspension forks. Full details here.

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Knock-off “Shimona” parts showing up at shops


Unscrupulous manufacturers mimic the name of a well-known brand by simply changing a couple of letters so that the casual observer or someone not familiar with that product won’t notice.

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  • josh says:

    Any photos of a Shimona labeled part? Curious to see these. Also, that SunRun cogset is technically a freewheel, isn’t it?

  • Mac says:

    So someone in china is making cheap ass parts that are specd on very low end bikes while using a name similar to another company that also makes low end parts? Holy crap! Pulitzer material here!
    Josh – he doesn’t have any info of fake Shimano parts, that was just clickbait.

  • Dickachu says:

    what about overpriced “boutiques” made in china?

  • Dickachu says:

    just go to ali baba and by fake or real but not passed QC stuff, like 25$ nrt45 and surly tires tyres

  • MBR says:

    Wasn’t that a song lyric from the ’80s?

    Ma, ma, ma, my Shimona

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ENVE carbon cockpit review


ENVE is renowned for its carbon wheels, but the Ogden, Utah-based company offers a variety of other carbon components, including its often overlooked stems and bars.

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New MTB grips from ESI, Lizard Skins and ODI


For many riders grips can make or break a perfect day in the saddle. Here’s what’s new in this critical touch-point component.

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  • Chicken Rider says:

    Always wondered when you talk about grip, why you don’t try to match glove palm compounds/materials that match up well with the grip.

    • jordan.villella@gmail.com says:

      That’s a good idea chicken rider! Mostly I’m in my Hand Up gloves and on cold days I’ll rock anything from ski gloves to neoprene.

  • Chris says:

    TOGS work great. My thumbs are hooked around them 90% of the time when climbing.

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Lindarets Thru Axle Wheel Mount


Born – as these things often are – of a specific need, the Lindarets Thru Axle Wheel Mount was made to securely hold thru axle front wheels in their workshop.

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BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post Review


Aptly named Revive infinite travel dropper post directly addresses issue of air leakage (and the ensuing mushy performance) by equipping the post with a valve that when activated resets the hydraulic circuit.

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  • Mike D says:

    Bought one to replace my mushy broked reverb for 385 and it came with the bled lever, works pretty good, the only problem is that my butt got use to the mushy seat action so it now hurts a bit to ride a seat that doesn’t move. The release lever is a decent size and works pretty good.

  • justin says:

    Jenson 20% off coupon works on these, and it comes with lever. So not that expensive

  • adaycj says:

    “infinite travel” … now that is amazing.

    I love the idea. Just admit that it is going to screw up and make it a feature. I’m sticking to my long lived cheap dropper posts until the market has proven that a high end offering is actually reliable. The high end market for these things is a shameful mess.

    Maybe this thing will be reliable, and added bleed will make occasional fixes easy and quick. I’ll check back in maybe in a year …

    • dave says:

      I’ve had mine for 4 months and revived it once (revive = the bleed process that takes all of 10 seconds). I’m not sure what else to call a post that’s done close to 1000 miles with 10 seconds of maintenance other than reliable.

      • tony says:

        Same here, totally reliable after almost a year. I’ve had to reset quite a bit because of turning the bike upside down, or lifting the bike by the saddle, and only when the post is lower than full height. I’ll take that “con” all day over any of the other posts out there.

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FSA Flowtron dropper post review


The $299 Flowtron dropper post features smooth action with a massive dropper lever with adjustable tension to customize rider feel and control.

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  • geephlow says:

    Hey FSA, Where’s our royalties? We’ll take it in beers in the lot. –HLC

  • Jewam says:

    Is the cartridge user serviceable ? If so how ?
    If not then how much for factory robbery or replacement ?
    How easy was the install ? Directions ? Setup steps ?
    Tuneable return speed ?
    Other lengths available and for different seat post diameters ?
    FSA website has no mention of this product !
    Lots missing in this review.

    • jordan.villella@gmail.com says:

      UPDATE,

      Yes, the cartridge is serviceable via direct replacement and will be available in a kit through FSA distributors and local retailers. The cartridge is threaded into the stanchion and lower actuator and takes about 15 minutes to change out. A brass key and bushing service kit will also be available.

      The Flowtron will be available this Spring at local retailers. Complete information will be updated on the FSA website at this time. Installation instructions are supplied and will be available on FSA’s website.

      Return speed can be modulated with the remote but is not mechanically adjustable.

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Robert Axle Project axle review


Mtbr checks out this small company’s thru axle solutions for every bike and situation.

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  • Don says:

    Do they make one for an MRP Stage?

  • Matt says:

    I do not see how this product addresses the original problem of a thru axle backing out? (I do see this as a good product for security or a bike trailer, but not normal a Mtn concern)

    If anything I think this is a worse solution, because you need a tool to tighten and untighten. Also if it does start to back out you would not be able to look down and see if it is in the position you always place the lever arm. Am I missing something?

    • Alec says:

      Matt, I’ve had one of these for my rear for almost a year now that I bought because it was 1) cheaper and 2) less likely to break than the equivalent Maxle. I’ve broken 2 QR axles by overpowering the little lever and have had no issues with this one backing out or anything else. It does require a tool, but I always have one when I’m riding anyway.

  • Joseph says:

    I put Robert Axle Project Lightning Bolt on Thru Axles on my Turner RFX last year and couldn’t be happier with them. Clean look, secure (haven’t loosened up once) and saved a bunch of grams. I can’t see the complaint about not being able to tell if the axles are loose. Man, my bike has so many pivots and bolts (most bikes do) that #1 – safe operation means routinely checking fasteners and using proper torque & #2 – carrying tools to take care of any necessary trail side mechanicals!

  • Eric says:

    I’ve got two: one for my ‘cross bike(Norco Threshold) and one for my road bike (Canyon Endurace). Bought them so I could use the bikes on my Wahoo Kickr Snap trainer. Well worth the cheddar!

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AbsoluteBLACK silicone grips launched


Soft, yet densely packed nature of the silicone offers excellent handling and performance, combining a high levels of traction, a soft but firm feel, and no squish or instability.

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Paul Component 35mm Boxcar stem is a beauty


Paul Component has announced release of a 35mm Boxcar Stem that is available in Black, Silver, Polished and whatever the current limited edition color may be (currently blue).

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Most annoying, irrational, counterintuitive things about mountain biking


Most bike maintenance is fairly straightforward, involving whatever wrench and lube you have handy. But some things are just plain silly. Like all these things…

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  • Matthew says:

    Clip-less makes a ton of sense if you are familiar with what a “Toe-Clip” pedal setup looked like. Before Clipless the only way to “secure” ones feet to the pedals and allow for up-stroke power pull was via a toe-clip that strapped around the toe of ones shoe.

  • Al Tinti says:

    From the title, I thought it was going to talk about really annoying features of modern mountain bikes, like internal brake hose routing, press fit bottom brackets, etc. I do concur about derailleur limit screw confusion, but the rest is just trivial.

  • Nomad says:

    … spending 10X more watching vids & trolling than riding —> Me ! And everyone else reading
    … riders yelping “Hell yea”, “Sick bro !”, “Yup”, etc etc Arrghhh —> Nate Hills
    … bike reviews too long yak yak specs yak “great value” Yawn… –> Clint Gibbs , BKXC
    … Youtubers handing out stickers on their trail rides –> Seth Hack, BKXC

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    Let’s change clipless pedals to clip-in pedals and then change toeclips to toe-cages. That’s how I keep it straight.

  • joules says:

    I agree with the slow news week comment. Every thing in this list is stupid, and if that’s all the author can complain about modern bikes, they must be amazing.

    Author has clearly never designed anything or even looked hard at a bike and tried to understand why things are the way they are.

    Major missed point about rapid rise: magazines loved it, everyone else hated it. No one bought it. Remember Sram was in their infancy back then – if it hadn’t been for rapid rise and shimano trying to cram it down our throats, they probably never would have gotten off the ground, cashing in on people desperately wanting anything not rapid rise.

    • juan_speeder says:

      I loved Rapid Rise. It actually worked better because the spring tension alone allowed the derailleur to shift at the proper points on the cog during downshifts. I could pull the trigger plenty fast to downshift just fine in any scenario.

    • steve says:

      I still have a bike with rapid rise, and it is the best shifting system that I have ridden. Fast shifts and both levers going the same way for up or down. Now that the ETSX70 is a one by, the rear der still shifts like a dream. I bought it and still love it.

  • brian tunney says:

    There is little to complain about on this stuff IMO (sure, I used to).
    Now I’ve discovered the time it takes me to adjust, realize I went the wrong way, re-adjust and check the set points, it’s about the time it takes to enjoy one beer properly. If the engineers hadn’t tricked us in these clever blunders, I’d have to find other hobbies to inflict profanity-laden beer breath.
    * And NO, beer won’t help you remember which way to turn the screws next time EITHER !! 😀

  • Philo says:

    Lamest article ever. Wow. Bitching about left-hand threads and headset caps! WTF? Oh and by the way, if you don’t know how something works, take it to a shop! You never need to adjust the derailleur high and low screws once they are set for your bike….so don’t touch them.

  • Chris Pincetich says:

    and it endlessly frustrating the frequency that special tools are required for maintenance
    – chainring bolt requires special tool
    – cassette nut requires special tool
    and there’s more, but these are the two I am dealing with lately

  • Aaron Sherwood says:

    Ignorant article.

  • russell says:

    I think Paul meant this whole article as tongue in cheek..

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BikeYoke REVIVE MAX unveiled


German component maker BikeYoke has launched what it’s calling the first truly dedicated 34.9 dropper post for trail bikes. Travel options are 125mm, 160mm, and 185mm.

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Build a bombproof, cost-effective winter drivetrain


Winter; when roads covered in ice mixed with salt, conditions like these are not great for metal grinding on metal, ie, your bike’s drivetrain.

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  • Shark says:

    Shimano XT cassette, < $65.

  • Rhone Betrault says:

    Subjecting a very nice ride to salt, cold and grime…
    After spending around $350 to “winterize” it…
    For less worries pickup a beater bike for under $50… and save your other ride.

  • Rick says:

    @Shark
    Marketing folks rack their brains to upsell everyone on more gears nobody asked for and you’re suggesting “outdated junk”. You’d better be quiet there. Take it for the team and support economy.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      >>Marketing folks

      I would like to thank marketing folks for 1x drivetrains. And big tires, and dropper posts and brakes that work. 🙂

  • Rabob says:

    This is the dumbest thing I’ve ever read. Replace all the super high end parts on your bike with cheap parts! WTF..to “save” them? It’s a mountain bike, it’s literally designed to be ridden around in dirt.

  • jrp says:

    Indeed, build the whole beater bike. A heavy, reliable beast of a hardtail with cheapest drivetrain that still works. Bonus points for singlespeeding. Then realize you only need lighter tires to have fun on it come summer. Sell the nice rig.

    And hey, I’ve been riding 1x before it was cool!

  • jabpn says:

    I’ve got to admit, as a winter rider, I’m surprised by this list. When it comes to winter riding, yes, the salt, slush and temperature swings from going outside to inside and back, indeed reeks havoc on bicycle components. However, many of the parts listed here are head scratchers. First of all, the wider the spacing between actual gear cogs and a thicker chain help a lot over newer drivetrains due to the increased clearance for snow and ice to escape. Even then, it’s not uncommon to lose gears due to the chain skipping off of iced up cogs.
    Another common issue is the clogging of swivel points on brake arms and derailleurs. As such, I’d think that Shimano Acera, Altus, Alivio, Sora, Clarus, SRAM 3x/5x, or Tekro would be the go to mentions for parts on a winter bike. These lines may be the lowest in their respective manufacturer’s lineups but they are lower end “high quality”, products (unlike say Shimano Tourney – dept. store bikes). The point is, for winter riding where you do have to deal with thick snow days, sub 20 temps and so on, you will be dealing with seized parts, and when WD-40 or PB Blaster don’t work to free those parts up, well, $10-$30 replacement parts is a whole lot easier to swallow and “better” parts are no better at preventing issues.

    • maaakaaa says:

      Jabpn, I think what you suggest makes a lot of sense if you are building a bike around winter riding, but may be less cost-effective and more work to retrofit. If you are running a 1×11 or 1×12 for example, switching to a lower end like Altus or X3 would require replacing the shifter as well, and would significantly change your gearing as you lose the larger cassette cogs.

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Deep dive into SRAM’s new DUB system


Lighter than the Race Face Next SL and compatible with all major bottom bracket shell sizes, SRAM’s DUB crank system is worth a closer look.

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  • dan says:

    So it’s like the Praxis crank/bb system?

  • I'mRight says:

    Can we solve bigger issues now like: rusty stem cap bolts?

  • adaycj says:

    Ah, so it fits with every BB so they can sell them to whomever, but 24mm wasn’t stiff enough, 30mm was too big. The market here is already an epic cluster, so what is another 370 part numbers?

    SRAMhas done a pretty good job of holding a large portion of the market for new 1X stuff. This “it fits almost any” BB without making a warranty mess just solidifies it. Not that anyone else will care, its not like its upgrade worthy.

  • Chris says:

    No 165mm? No sale.

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SRAM DUB cranksets


There are few headaches in the bike world like the current bottom bracket landscape. SRAM aims to unify the current sea of standards with one system without introducing a new shell standard.

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Best of 2017: Jason’s Top Gear Picks


Here’s another Best Gear of 2017 list, this time from Mtbr features editor Jason Sumner. Let us know what you think of his selections in the comments section.

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  • Jimbo says:

    Nice picks. On the Hightower, did you get an XL because the XXL hadn’t been released yet, or did the XL feel better to you? I’m a similar height and between sizes, can’t decide which one I’d like more.

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Best of 2017: Saris’ Top Gear Picks


Here are the top 2017 gear picks from former Mtbr tech editor Saris Mercanti, including a helmet, cassette, multi-tool and more.

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Canyon Torque super enduro bike launched


German direct-to-consumer seller unveils new Torque super-enduro bike, aluminum Sender DH rig, and G5, the company’s new line of gravity-focused handlebars, stems, and grips.

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FSA SL-K BB392-EVO Modular Crankset review


If you’re looking for a crankset for your next cross-country or enduro race build, the FSA SL-K-392 EVO Modular belongs on your short list.

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Race Face Cinch power meter now available


Canada Cup XC Champ Evan Guthrie isn’t your typical spandex and salads weight weenie cross country racer. He races in baggies, can send it harder than most while tracking wattage with his power meter.

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How to choose a dropper post


Most riders want the most drop that will fit on their bike. But stack height and insert length are key considerations when choosing a post that will fit you and your bike.

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  • uncyclist says:

    I need a 27.2 for a 29er hardtail and looks like only about a 100mm drop? I’m not too fussed about internal or external routing.

    • JRT says:

      The various Gravity dropper posts are not the newest or lightest, but those use coil springs and mechanical detent latches rather than the pneumatic air pressure which relies on seals that wear and are subject to contamination and damage. I think the Gravity’s coil spring based design is much more reliable and I would rather have that reliability. Opinions vary.

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