Gear Reviews and News


Yakima HoldUp EVO and BackSwing – video


The first gen HoldUp rack introduced nifty features but the EVO + BackSwing deserves a mic drop.

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Henty Enduro Backpack – video


The Henty Enduro Backpack provides the benefits of a hip pack with the stability of a backpack.

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MTBguru changes name, expands app


Free social media app aimed at connecting riders with local knowledge and services, is changing its name to JAGZ.

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Spurcycle Tool review


Slim enough to fit in most any jersey pocket or seat pack, Spurcycle’s Tool has a machined titanium socket and arm accompanied by 10, chrome-coated bits.

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GÜP KWIKI sealant and inflator


GÜP KWIKI is light weight, eco-friendly and is said to seal up-to a 4mm puncture, read more to find out if it’s too good to be true.

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  • Gman says:

    I’ve had a can of Güp strapped to my frame for a few months, and last week I got to use it to repair a flat on a tubeless 27.5 x 2.4 tire. I was back up and running in about 60 seconds. Is it worth $15? To me, it is.

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In search of the most secure bottle cage


How many water bottles have you lost while charging through gnar? Too many is likely the answer. So what’s the best bottle cage for keeping your water secure?

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  • Tom says:

    Hilarious and useful video, but most of us bottle snobs have bikes that allow cages inside the front triangle. Absent that, it’s hard to argue with the strap approach.

  • frank says:

    The velcro strap thing is a good idea except for one small problem…you’re going to have to stop the bike to put the water bottle back into the cage because the strap will close the empty cage so the the bottle won’t go back in.

    King cages won’t work for this test either, remember commentators, this is a test for harsh MTB riding conditions not riding a road bike, or a MTB down relatively smooth dirt paths, I know the King Cage won’t work because I tried it for those conditions and tossed bottles (I do like the cage though just not for rough offroading), after I tried a bunch of cages I resorted to my Camelbak instead, no more problems. I normally don’t like stuff on my back when riding but with MTBing I don’t ride as long as I do riding on the road so it’s not as much of an issue.

    • Frank H says:

      King Cages hold a bottle much better than an Al cage. I have never lost a bottle from one, at least from the Ti model, even from under the downtube on an MTB.

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Cush Core – What is it and what do users think about it?


But does it work? Is the extra weight noticeable? Does it make the bike feel differently when out on the trail? All of these questions and more have been answered by Skills with Phil.

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  • Justin says:

    How do they justify $160/pair? It’s foam. Hopefully a competitor will come out and undercut this nonsense.

    • MTB4me says:

      And hopefully you are pleased with your 1997 Huffy that you found “undercutting” the “nonsense” bike you should have paid for….What nonsense it right!

    • Phil Kmetz says:

      Justin, Economies of scales. Let’s say a mould for this product costs $100,000 (100% wild guess). If 100,000 people were to buy it, the cost of the mould across all the customers and would come down to $1 each (assuming they buy one single CushCore). 100,000 customers is most likely unrealistic, CushCore a very niche product for a specific group of riders willing. A more realistic estimation is that ~5,000 people will buy this product. That would bring the cost up to 20 dollars per person. This doesn’t factor in extra valves, raw material costs, office space, operating expenses, labor, R&D, distribution, marketing, and profit margin. Hopefully that helps clarify why a “piece of foam” can be so expensive.

  • Steve says:

    Phil,
    How long did it take to install the cushcore in real time not including adding Stan’s and airing up ?

    • Phil Kmetz says:

      Steve, the first time it took nearly 40 minutes because it was a new procedure. Now it takes me 10-15 minutes, it’s bit more involved than a standard tubeless tire install.

  • Kenny Roberts says:

    MSRP is actually $149 before tax.

  • Joe says:

    I agree, they are expensive — this is a small company and it seems they are attempting to recover their development costs.
    Same questions apply: How does Apple justify $1000 for a phone? How does Cromag justify $4400 for a Steel Hardtail? It is dictated by what the market will allow. Is it worth $160 to protect your $2000 carbon wheelset? Some people might think so.

  • EyeKickBooty says:

    Here is a concept: run this stuff called air in your tires instead of $150 worth of pipe insulation.

  • Josh Robinson says:

    After seeing this I’m tempted to cut a pool noodle in half and put it in my tires to see if I can save $160.

  • Troy says:

    FFS, people, keep your mouth shut (including me now). No one cares about your opinion unless you’ve used them. STFU already, whiny cheap skates.

  • Bill says:

    I have been running Cush Core for about one year. It definitely does mellow out the harsh hits your wheelset would normally be taking. You get a nice soft thud instead of a high pitched smack. I agree that these will definitely help people from ruining rims (both carbon and aluminum) and will save you money on cut tires. Im definitely not having as many sliced tires as before.
    The big thing everyone is talking about…. price. And weight to a lesser degree.
    yes, seemingly expensive for what it is. I do believe they will save the aggressive rider $160 in equipment, but should that be the determiner of price? Im sure there are up-front design and production expenses that are being recouped. I wonder if when those expenses are recovered we might see a more reasonable price for the average consumer.
    I am disappointed they added 1lb to the rotating weight of my bike at the very outer edge of the rotation. I can absolutely feel it. It now makes me want to build a lighter weight all mountain bike for the real “pedaly” days.
    Obviously the trade off is price and weight for more ease of mind and less money in repairs. If you ride aggressive and shuttle more than you pedal, Id say you’ll find this a very good addition to your bike.

  • Brian says:

    I do like it as it helps with cornering, smooths out harder hits, and protects the rim well but I just wish it were like 30 or so grams lighter per insert. Going from Schwalbe ProCore to CushCore, I could really notice the weight difference which makes the bike less playful. Surely they can find away to chisel away some extra weight? Make it a bit lighter and it’ll be perfect!

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VEE Tire Co. going green with eco-friendly enterprise


As part of their new 2018 Responsible for Recycling Program, VEE Tire Co. has collaborated with Tube Thailand to create unique key rings made solely from recycled tires.

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Frostbike 2018: Finish Line’s new sealant that never dries out


With groundbreaking Fiberlink Technology, Finish Line is confident that its new sealant will never dry out and won’t clog up your valve cores.

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  • Ben says:

    Can it be used in a tire that was previously running latex or other sealant or does it have to be a new tire?

    • Simon says:

      Hi – I’m a roadie (sorry), but can answer that. I recently tried to prolong the life of my Mavic UST yksion tubeless – my rear tyre had picked up a load of flint cuts through a bad winter and over about 2k miles. It had a number of slow punctures, some of which I could see and were sealing themselves with the Mavic own brand latex sealant, and others weren’t. I wasn’t sure what volume was left given they tyres had been on the wheel for about 5 months, so I added some of the Finish Line Kevlar stuff. If anything, I think this made the air loss worse (still nothing that would instantly kill a ride, but deflation over a 12hr+ period). So I removed tyre, removed the obvious traces of latex and hosed it off. Reinstalled with Finish Line Kevlar stuff. More difficult to seat the tyre this time round (probably because it was having to re-fill all the re-opened holes), but with a shot at c.140psi it was fine. The next two rides it spat a few mls of the fluid out over my seatpost, but no kevlar bits emerged, and no noticeable air loss. So thus far it looks like a) the Finish Line stuff is working, and b) you definitely need to make sure your tyres are a latex-free zone before you use it. I’m now certain to gain a catastrophic blowout / valve leak on the way home having said all that…

  • Joseph Graf says:

    Looks like it is probably the same stuff. This is from the Amazon questions and answers section: For off-road motorcycle tires you can use our MULTI SEAL Sportsman Formula.
    For mountain bike tubeless tires, pick up MULTI SEAL’s bicycle formula. Ask your local bike shop for Finish Line Tubeless Tire Sealant.
    If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to call 1-800-577-3353 to talk with someone on our technical team or send an email to tech@multiseal.us

  • Nick says:

    Just spoke to the guys at Multi Seal and apparently they worked with Finish Line to develop the product for Mountain Bike use. They stated that the ratios of the fibers are different than their Sportsman products (e.g. ATV’s, etc…). He said that the biggest challenge was the air volume of MTB tires being so different than their other applications. He recommended using the Finish Line product for MTB use and not to purchase the Multi Seal product.

  • BK says:

    Very cool. Along with all my mountain bike tires, this may get me to switch over to tubeless on my road bike as well.

  • DWM says:

    I like FlexSeal. I can use it in my gutters too…

  • Coyote W.E. says:

    Got it a week ago.
    Got it on Race King (rear) and Schwalbe Racing Ralph (front).
    A large screw was removed, lost 50% of the sealant but got back on the bike for another 15 miles. (in 10 minutes. No pump or any action was requiered. Tyer pressure remains)
    No issues, clean and works perfectly.
    Highly recommended.

  • willie goat says:

    I tied the stuff today on a new Nobby Nic and it never held air completely. Thought maybe riding would help, but 10 miles in, flatted, re=inflated, was almost flat at the end of the ride. Going back to Stan’s.

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Skydio R1 self-flying drone first look


Skydio R1 aims to break the mold of failed follow-me drones that capture your rad mountain biking shred-fests.

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  • Christopher says:

    Hmm, last time I rode down a mountain I hit speeds over 50 MPH – I guess this drone is ready for following people doing tough climbs, but not not much else (at least bike related).

    I mean, any serious cyclist will reach speeds over 25MPH either on road or off, right?

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      Getting video footage of a person going 50mph downhill on a fire road is not the most interesting content.

      Most of the interesting footage happens in slower, technical, tighter trails.

    • jim says:

      Christopher, yes agreed downhill can be a speed thing, but also think about straight line vs up and down a hilly downhill. Id be happy with the jump trails, and technical steep down hill types. BUTTTTT only 15min of flight time, is short. that would be like 1 run.

  • Alex says:

    But for slower technical riding it could awesome. A lot of riding in Southern BC is slow and techy so it could be a great option here. I’d be more concerned about collision avoidance in denser forest. And then there’s that price tag to consider.

  • myke says:

    this is not what needs promoting in cycling world.

  • Michael says:

    I’m excited for the day a real product comes out that lives up to the claims here. Maybe Skydio is the one, but I’ll be waiting for reviews.

  • Abe says:

    Tried it! If your near trees and the trail in not straight, then this generation drone is not the one.
    ** you always have to look over your shoulder to make sure the drone is following. It looses its subject very quickly if your riding at bike speed.
    ** drone makes super wide turns, thus if your in an area with lots of trees, you need to slow down to a CRAWL.
    It does great in open area where there are no trees. But 15min. of a rider down a dirt road or trail……….. is probably not the best 15min. of a youtube segment.
    ** its about 12×18″ which is big to carry around for 15min. of footage
    Its an expensive toy $2500 for what it films. This is silicon valley and plenty of early adapters with $ burning in their pockets.
    Maybe the next generation will fit the bill?

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Lezyne Enhanced Super GPS Review


Riders looking for clean and straightforward tracking look no further. The Lezyne Enhanced Super GPS offers much for a low asking price.

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  • RB says:

    I’m most interested in the nav features. So I tried using their web app (Lezyne Root) to upload a gpx from TrailForks and create a route. Buggy, confusing, feels like it was built for Windows Vista. The device itself looks nice.

  • Cole Trickle says:

    Can someone, anyone, please come in and disrupt this archaic market? Oh wow, another blocky piece of crap GPS computer with a monochrome LCD screen that picks up GPS signals reasonably well (they all do, because SIRF chips).

    Although it would never happen, this is definitely where a Nest-like company would come in and shake up a moribund thermostat market.

    This device has nothing, absolutely nothing, that would make me switch from my other moribund, boring, nondescript GPS device with a horrible capacitive-resistance touchscreen, a UI designed by one of the Golden Girls, and the industrial design of the power steering pump on my 1997 Toyota Corolla.

    • GrumpyOldPizza says:

      The GNSS is based upon a MTK3333, not SiRF … chip antenna.

      I do love the monochrome screen. Less junk to be confused about when the sun shines in at a bad angle, or your glasses are dripping wet.

      Use it really as a simple bike computer, no real navigation on my daily routes. The killer feature for me (at this price) is that I see who is calling me while I am on the bike. I can now ignore certains calls (aka “Wife’s where are you” …). Also I can see e-mails (“Boss wants to know how long the lunch break still takes”).

  • Gonzo says:

    I’ve been using one for a few months and I love it. Battery life is fantastic. I can customize the screen to show what I want, where I want. Easily connects to third party HR monitor as well as Speed/Cadence monitor. For the price, you can’t beat it. I love that it syncs to Strava automatically, but will allow me to set the ride to auto-privacy. So, if you want a do-it-all and not have to pay $200+, this is the best thing in town.

  • Mars says:

    I bought one of these last year and have been very disappointed.

    The user interface is just awful and the most annoying thing is that you have to remember to set it to record because turning it on does not actually completely turn it on.

    I ended up going back to my Garmin GPSMAP 64.

  • Leaway2 says:

    This is all about price. I picked one up for £80 (unit only) and for that it is great value. The nearest rival probably being the Garmin 25. This has much more. Most of the heavy lifting being done by the phone. The Lezyne web site looks as though it was a high school project and the navigation is unusable. Just use Ride with GPS and upload a GPX,TCX. I Recommend this a cheap stand alone unit to record rides, with the option of connecting a phone for the odd occasion if needed.

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Most annoying, irrational, counterintuitive things about mountain biking


Most bike maintenance is fairly straightforward, involving whatever wrench and lube you have handy. But some things are just plain silly. Like all these things…

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  • Matthew says:

    Clip-less makes a ton of sense if you are familiar with what a “Toe-Clip” pedal setup looked like. Before Clipless the only way to “secure” ones feet to the pedals and allow for up-stroke power pull was via a toe-clip that strapped around the toe of ones shoe.

  • Al Tinti says:

    From the title, I thought it was going to talk about really annoying features of modern mountain bikes, like internal brake hose routing, press fit bottom brackets, etc. I do concur about derailleur limit screw confusion, but the rest is just trivial.

  • Nomad says:

    … spending 10X more watching vids & trolling than riding —> Me ! And everyone else reading
    … riders yelping “Hell yea”, “Sick bro !”, “Yup”, etc etc Arrghhh —> Nate Hills
    … bike reviews too long yak yak specs yak “great value” Yawn… –> Clint Gibbs , BKXC
    … Youtubers handing out stickers on their trail rides –> Seth Hack, BKXC

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    Let’s change clipless pedals to clip-in pedals and then change toeclips to toe-cages. That’s how I keep it straight.

  • joules says:

    I agree with the slow news week comment. Every thing in this list is stupid, and if that’s all the author can complain about modern bikes, they must be amazing.

    Author has clearly never designed anything or even looked hard at a bike and tried to understand why things are the way they are.

    Major missed point about rapid rise: magazines loved it, everyone else hated it. No one bought it. Remember Sram was in their infancy back then – if it hadn’t been for rapid rise and shimano trying to cram it down our throats, they probably never would have gotten off the ground, cashing in on people desperately wanting anything not rapid rise.

    • juan_speeder says:

      I loved Rapid Rise. It actually worked better because the spring tension alone allowed the derailleur to shift at the proper points on the cog during downshifts. I could pull the trigger plenty fast to downshift just fine in any scenario.

    • steve says:

      I still have a bike with rapid rise, and it is the best shifting system that I have ridden. Fast shifts and both levers going the same way for up or down. Now that the ETSX70 is a one by, the rear der still shifts like a dream. I bought it and still love it.

  • brian tunney says:

    There is little to complain about on this stuff IMO (sure, I used to).
    Now I’ve discovered the time it takes me to adjust, realize I went the wrong way, re-adjust and check the set points, it’s about the time it takes to enjoy one beer properly. If the engineers hadn’t tricked us in these clever blunders, I’d have to find other hobbies to inflict profanity-laden beer breath.
    * And NO, beer won’t help you remember which way to turn the screws next time EITHER !! 😀

  • Philo says:

    Lamest article ever. Wow. Bitching about left-hand threads and headset caps! WTF? Oh and by the way, if you don’t know how something works, take it to a shop! You never need to adjust the derailleur high and low screws once they are set for your bike….so don’t touch them.

  • Chris Pincetich says:

    and it endlessly frustrating the frequency that special tools are required for maintenance
    – chainring bolt requires special tool
    – cassette nut requires special tool
    and there’s more, but these are the two I am dealing with lately

  • Aaron Sherwood says:

    Ignorant article.

  • russell says:

    I think Paul meant this whole article as tongue in cheek..

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Salsa introduces new EXP Series Hardtail and Fat Bike framepacks


Whether you’re on a fat bike or a hardtail, Salsa has you and your gear covered with new EXP Series Framepacks.

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Top 5 reasons why GoPro is exiting the drone business


Entering the drone market in Sept of 2016, GoPro abruptly announced that it was abandoning the effort as of Jan, 2018. Here’s why we think it happened.

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  • Oleksii says:

    Who gives a s…t about some drone…

  • Cameron says:

    I traveling back in 2012 and bought a GoPro while overseas. I was stoked to finally have the camera everyone raved about. What was originally excitement turned to disappointment as experience after experience I failed to capture due to malfunction of the batteries and the camera itself.

    GoPro was never and still is not a camera company. They took some BS Chinese made camera that was not fit for purpose and which they charged a fortune for. All but the very latest (I’m going by their marketing material) model had extremely poor low light performance, overheated, destroyed memory cards or discharged the battery even while switched off. In their defence they made some decent cases but their major factor for their success was the marketing material which their users provided for free. On that topic, I call bulls##t on the early crystal clear underwater footage used in their videos. If those videos were taken with a GoPro, I’m a monkey’s uncle!

    GoPro is the epitome of everything that’s wrong with marketing driven companies who don’t place enough importance in engineering. I had this argument so many times with people who seemed to believe that marketing was the most important thing. It’s not and it shouldn’t be. Producing a great product with great support should be front and foremost. Instead GoPro’s gift to early adopters was to ignore the existing problems and move on to the next absurdly expensive replacement which had many of the same problems.

    Yeah, you fool people for a time, but eventually it’ll go full circle and people will start calling you on your BS and unfortunately people will lose their jobs and investors will lose their capital. I thought I was going mad back when no one could see GoPro for what they were – a bunch of camera charlatans.

  • Cholla says:

    Wellsaid Cameron, totally agree with your statement…

  • Sean says:

    Well written, Cameron, I too was always underwhelmed by the product returned from a VERY expensive kids movie camera with NO preview screen (or at least a laser that pointed to the center of the frame.) Gotta change with the times, GoPro, you kind of rode your initial success too long I think.

  • Lou says:

    Why are you NOT BANKRUPT ALREADY LOL LOL JUNK JUNK JUNK

  • Lou says:

    Just like at their 6.00 share stock a JOKE GOPRO finally had people catch on to them
    as a JOKE OF A COMPANY HEY GOPRO Ill be there when you sell all you junk for scrap LMAO

  • Jim says:

    Since you guys are bashing the GoPro….what do you recommend instead?

  • John Mathew says:

    gopro karma was the worst drone I ever got, since DJI and parrot are in the market. gopro karma is nothing but waste of money. You could get a lot of better drones is same price with better camera and flight time.

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Crankbrothers Double Shot 1 pedal launched


Featuring molded traction pins for grip, wide 57mm q-factor for clearance and control, and durable stamped-steel wings, the Double Shot 1 gives riders the option to ride flat or clipped-in. Price is just $60 per set.

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Wolf Tooth’s Master Link Combo Pliers unveiled


The latest product in Wolf Tooth’s new Pack Tools series, the 38g Master Link Combo Pliers pick up where most compact multi-tools leave off.

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Best of 2017: Paul’s Top Gear Picks


Here’s another in Mtbr’s series of Best Gear picks for 2017, this time coming from Seattle-based contributor Paul Andrews. Agree? Disagree? Let us know in the comments section.

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Best of 2017: Jason’s Top Gear Picks


Here’s another Best Gear of 2017 list, this time from Mtbr features editor Jason Sumner. Let us know what you think of his selections in the comments section.

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  • Jimbo says:

    Nice picks. On the Hightower, did you get an XL because the XXL hadn’t been released yet, or did the XL feel better to you? I’m a similar height and between sizes, can’t decide which one I’d like more.

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Best of 2017: Saris’ Top Gear Picks


Here are the top 2017 gear picks from former Mtbr tech editor Saris Mercanti, including a helmet, cassette, multi-tool and more.

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Round up: Cool new tools for the home mechanic


These handy gadgets will make taking care of your bike a snap — and could bail you out of a jam while you’re out on a ride.

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PUSH launches trunnion shock, Pike/Lyrik ACS3 kits


Colorado’s PUSH Industries is expanding its range of suspension components with several new offerings, including a trunnion mount shock and RockShox Pike/Lyrik conversion kit.

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Ritchey Kite WCS dropper post now available


First teased at last fall’s Eurobike tradeshow, the Ritchey dropper post is finally here. The air sprung Kite WCS comes in two travel lengths (125mm, 90mm), has three fixed position stops (0mm, 35mm, 125mm).

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Douchebags 30L Hugger backpack review


Douchebags 30L Hugger backpack is a solid and functional piece of travel luggage that looks cool, too.

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Wahoo KICKR trainer and Zwift platform first look


Nights are long and cold now so any option that can keep us pedaling is good. Indoor trainers used to be way too boring to be sustainable for most, but the Zwift platform is a new level of entertainment.

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Yakima Dr. Tray hitch rack review


Yakima wanted a rack that was lightweight and expandable, yet could handle all tire sizes. Did they succeed or try to do too much?

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  • ColinL says:

    I’ve used the Dr Tray and EZ+1 for about 5 months with my family of 3 who all ride. Previously I’ve used several roof systems and both hanging and tray-style hitch racks. The worst by far, no contest, are hanging style racks. If you haul more than one bike they will move and scrape against each other unless you pad them and bungee extensively. (And even though, good luck.) Trays solve that, but if you have bar-to-bar or bar-to-saddle interference you normally can’t do much. That’s the whole value Dr Tray brings. And roof racks are a huge hit in vehicle MPG at highway speeds. My old Audi wagon went from 25 mpg at 75mph to 17.5 mpg (yes) with 3 MTBs on the roof and sounded like a ride in a small commuter jetliner. Dr Tray isn’t that massive on a typical 3-row crossover, SUV or pickup truck. The vehicle used in this review is about the smallest you can expect to have a hitch with sufficient departure clearance. Anyway, I think this is the best 2- or 3-bike tray on the market.

  • Sam says:

    Had this rack for a trip to Moab and ran into the same issue Robert Gibson had — our size small and size medium trail bikes would basically fall backwards. The bikes never fell off the rack — but seeing two $8k bikes teetering at 75mph freeway and on the offroad trails was enough to give this rack away and switch back to the old Yakima hitch rack.

    • altaracks says:

      We off road with our rack in Moab for two years prior to intrducing it to the market. Made in Utah and tested in Moab. altaracks(dot)com. Rack companies treat bikes like they are disposable. We cuddle your bike, and then store it in your garage on the same rack.

  • Alain says:

    crazy light at 34lbs for 2 bikes… my custom made ALU 2 bike (expandable back to 4) re-using the Thule T2 parts (which are still heavy steal for arms) but rebuilt with ALU bars is 24lbs.

  • Safety Guy says:

    What about tail lights and license plate mount? Why is Europe the only place doing bike racks properly??

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