How To Guides


How to prevent common cycling injuries


Mtbr sat down with exercise scientist Matthew Tinkey to hear what riders can do to prevent and heal from a variety of injuries.

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  • David says:

    The picture above for the Pigeon, doesn’t match the description. The description talks about lying on your back, and doing what is known as “eye of the needle” or “thread the needle” move.

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How To: Find More Speed on Mountain Bike Trails


Whether it’s pumping, pre-hopping, finding a natural berm through a corner, or just railing finding the fastest line, gaining speed from the trail is integral to progressing as a rider. So how do you do it?

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e*thirteen’s TRS Plus 12-Speed Upgrade Kit


Fight obsolescence. Upgrade your 11 speed SRAM™ drivetrain to 12 speeds without needing new shifters, derailleurs, cranks, or chainrings.

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  • chris says:

    this is pretty f’ing awesome.

    I don’t use FB, but @Joe Nawrocki, STFU.
    This has nothing to do with capitalism and everything to do with E*13 giving essentially the middle finger to the bike industry for screwing over consumers every 3 months with some “new” trend. 11s had been out for what, maybe 2yrs?

  • Rusty says:

    I feel like a moron here but I cannot get my shifter to upshift after installing the new E13 spool. I consider myself a pretty good mechanic but this is a lot tougher than they let on and I wouldn’t call the video foolproof by any means. The step at 6:00 is pretty poorly explained and I’m guessing it’s where I’m messing things up. Now I have an non functional shifter and a race on Sunday. Wonderful.

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How To: Counter Steer Around A Corner


Counter steering around corners is an advanced technique that requires you to think about and react to what is going on throughout the corner, almost instantly.

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  • LouRider says:

    I love GMBN, and the discussion of weight was good, but this video totally misses on counter steering. He says something like “Use counter steering to get the bike leaned over.” This is 100% of the opposite of how counter steering works and what it does. Notice, he firsts steers *into* the the turn to the get the bike leaned over, then he uses counter steering to keep the bike from sliding out or turning too sharply. You can even see this in the still shot above the video: notice how his front tire is turned towards his left as he’s entering a left hand turn (the exact opposite of counter steering). Sure, you can hold a more pronounced lean longer using counter steering, but you don’t initiate that lean through counter steering. And while you’re in the turn, counter steering is actually used to keep the bike more upright.

    Disclaimer: Neil would absolutely destroy me on a bike and his turns are WAY better than anything I can do. Sometimes, though, folks don’t know how to best explain what it is they’re doing. And again, his discussion of weight is really good!

  • Gregor F. says:

    Advanced technique? No it’s how most people learned to turn a bicycle way back when they were 6 or 7 years old. It’s natural, don’t start overthinking it.

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Jeff Lenosky Trail Boss tackles Free Fall


The latest Jeff Lenosky Trail Boss episode features a slick slippery ride through San Lee Park in Sanford, North Carolina. Free Fall is a techy trail that’s even more difficult when wet.

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How To: Get Your Mountain Bike Ready for Summer


The summer cycling season is here. But is your bike ready to ride? If the answer is no (or I don’t know), then it’s time to get your bike ready for smooth riding with this helpful bike maintenance checklist.

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The mountain biking risk paradox


We choose to mountain bike and it’s an awesome elective in life. It’s a risky sport, on a spectrum from low to high. We choose, moment to moment, where on the spectrum we ride.

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  • craig says:

    Mountain biking in itself is not inherently dangerous.
    But to an ever greater degree than the sea,
    it’s terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect.

  • HrznRider says:

    As much as I love this great sport, I sometimes think I’ve become dependent on it… dependent on the thrill, dependent on the high, dependent on shiny new parts. Whereas before I could hit the gym or go for a quick jog and call it done. I’m 100% a mountain biker and love fueling the stoke but it’s definitely a paradox. Also, I’ve noticed that I crave more and more tech as time goes on and this isn’t a good thing at this point of my life.

    • Ryan Leech says:

      Thanks for sharing HrznRider, there’s no easy answer hence the paradox, though seeing and being aware of this dependence is the first major step in my experience, and more wise choices can spring even from just that. Keep grappling with the topic and hopefully by doing so your enjoyment of riding will continue rising too!

  • Velobike says:

    As most of my riding is done solo, and in places where other people rarely go, I’m cautious. The last thing I want is to have to call out mountain rescue so I ride accordingly.

    The reward for me is being in the mountains, not short-term thrills.

    I’m equally happy skipping across a bog or scrabbling up a scree slope with the bike on my back as I am on a testing climb or hurtling downhill.

    If I lived somewhere with restricted trail access and had to restrict my riding to designated loops maybe I’d be less cautious.

  • MC says:

    My favorite riding happens to be back country and most often that’s solo as I have to jump on the time slots as they open up. I’ve been mountain biking for quite a few years now and I don’t view it as more hazardous than anything else really… certainly less hazardous than waiting on the couch for heart disease and diabetes to show up.

    But I’m not “sending it”, especially in places where rescue could take 24+ hours. I also get peep laughing at my camelbak loaded with tools, spares, and survival kit… until they need something out of it. Wankers.

  • DayNO says:

    I’m a fairly reserved rider, I see the risk and I balance it with my desire to do it, my skill level, and the possible negative outcome. The biggest issue of risk/reward for me is in riding the more isolated trails, by myself. I can keep myself fairly safe with the rubber side down, but I have always been concerned about run-ins with the local fauna. Recently a biker was killed by a cougar and this has just sent my anxiety about it through the roof. I’ve seen creatures before, and I know how to handle an encounter, but this fear keeps me from doing some of the bigger rides by myself. Is this a concern for others too?

  • mike says:

    What are you risking…some bruising, maybe bike damage? Sure wear a helmet and get your skills up. Paralysis and death? Never worth that risk IMO.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      >>What are you risking…some bruising, maybe bike damage? Sure wear a helmet and get your skills up. Paralysis and death? Never worth that risk IMO.

      Part of the paradox is you don’t know exactly what you’re risking when you participate. You can get a splinter, a broken femur or a snapped neck from the same trail.

      That’s why the ‘risk spectrum’ is a good concept. The risk is always there. It’s just a question of where you choose to play: bike path < --> redbull rampage

      • mike says:

        but with experience you have a general idea based on speed and terrain. I think my point is clear without getting too pedantic.

  • ken kienow says:

    I find it helps to tailor my risk tolerance to how skilled I feel that day. If I’m having trouble doing smaller features and small jumps, I’ll skip the huge drop and massive double further down the trail. If I’m acing everything and feel ON that day, I’ll do the bigger stuff.

    …currently typing with a cast on, an injury sustained by following a talented friend down a high-risk trail on an OFF day where I was tired and messing up the lower-risk stuff. I wouldn’t have risked it were I by myself and I shouldn’t have attempted the high risk stuff this particular day. It’s hard to split up from your buddies though.

    Lesson learned.

    • Noy says:

      I totally agree. Peer pressure is one of the most dangerous things on the trail if not handled correctly. A good, trusted group of buddies who look out for you is a good thing. If you’re the skilled one in the group you should warn the others of a technical feature that is potentially dangerous. Some groups just go go go and they just disappear and all of sudden there’s a drop …..

    • Anthony says:

      100% this I like many others I balance responsibilities and long term impacts with the thrill of risk. Something I have definitely learnt is that if I am not feeling it I should go for it as it will not end well.

  • Survivor says:

    I do not take unnecessary risks. My family can’t afford the lengthy recuperation period if I’m injured and I don’t want to become a burden to relatives or taxpayers if injured. We risk a lot just getting up in the morning and driving in traffic or walking down the street so there is much risk we cannot avoid. I don’t feel the need to take more than the world already serves up. If you do, fine, especially if it brings you income.

  • pparker says:

    I have traded fast descents for fast uphill challenges. It took a C7 vertebrae fracture to make me appreciate that Mountain Biking is a gift that can destroy my current lifestyle and life if I’m not cautious. After a 4 month recovery I feel lucky and more respectful of the trail. At 60 with two kids there is a ton of fun to be had riding without going right up to your threshold. I usually ride alone so peer pressure doesn’t influence me. I hope to ride at least into my 70’s so time to slow down, listen to the sounds in the woods, take pictures of the astounding scenery and soak up the whole experience that is Mountain Biking.

  • Roy says:

    I’ve been riding a long time. First dirt bikes for years then mountain bikes. At 50 my skills have decreased somewhat but not that much. But my risk tolerance has gone down.

    I call it ‘the price of failure’. If that price is too high based on my ability, experience, and how I’m feeling that day I just step off and walk it.

    Now I gravitate now to smoother flow trails and away from the more techincal.

    I still like to get some air and rail turns on dirt trails but when it gets chunky I slow down. It hurts more and it takes longer to heal at this age.

    That said, I love riding and get grumpy when I can’t ride due to weather or injury or whatever.

    It’s a balance. Balancing the risk with the fun and th inking about work next week and will I be able to go riding again next weekend.

    At this age there”s a finite number of rides left in me. I don’t want to miss any.

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How to find new trails to ride


No matter how long you’ve been riding at some point you will (or at least should) go in search of new trails. But what’s the best way to find them?

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  • Sean says:

    Just get out and explore !

  • Shark says:

    I use both trailforks and mtbproject, great apps!
    However, sometimes the best ride is exploring a first service map and finding a trail that is new to you.
    One of the best things about riding a bike is exploring.

    • Marcus says:

      I use both as well. Both rely on users to upload data, so sometimes one has more info than the other.
      However, Trialforks “Ride Planner” tool gives TF a bit of an advantage. It really helps when it comes to trying to plan a route at a place with multiple route options. It will let you select a route, and will show you the total mileage as well as climbing. Highly recommend trying it out (assuming TF has good data for the trail you’re scoping).

  • joey says:

    Strava heat map!

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Want to ride steep rock rolls? BetterRide shows you how


Mountain biking requires balance, control, and being as smooth as possible. Learn more in this tutorial video.

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How to ride hip jumps on your mountain bike


Whether it’s a long low step down or a tall booter that sends you sky high, hip jumps are insanely fun to hit on your mountain bike. But the move also requires some skill.

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5 easy (and cheap) tips for shooting POV video


Jeff Lenosky has been shooting mountain bike videos for his Trail Boss series for a little over two years. Along the way he’s learned a few things about shooting quality POV footage on the trail.

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  • Osteo says:

    Thanks Jeff – those are great! coloured sharpie marker is a crazy simple and yet fantastic idea… could have used that last year at the BCBR!
    D

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How to: Progress from table tops to gap jumps


Hitting jumps is one of the most fun things about mountain biking. But progressing from table tops to gaps is daunting, especially as the consequences of not clearing the landing get more serious.

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  • Loll says:

    One thing I used to do is find some sofa cushions and abandon boards. Fill the gap in on the landing side for the first few time until you get your speed correct.

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How to: Do dirt jump tricks on the trail


Follow along with Blake Samson as he shows you how, and more importantly where, you can add slopestyle panache to your next ride on home trails.

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5 beginner riding skills you can learn without trails


Riding when trails are too wet is a no no. So go build your skills with drills instead.

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10 useful hacks for any cyclist


You’ll find at least one of these hacks useful, brilliant, or at least just plain funny.

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Nino Schurter’s Cape Epic Scott Spark RC 900


What is the perfect bike set-up for a mountain bike stage race? Find out with SCOTT-SRAM’s Yanick-the-Mechanic as he gets Nino Schurter’s bike ready for the Cape Epic in South Africa.

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How to descend faster on your mountain bike


Check out these three tips that will help you go faster downhill on your bike.

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Get Fit or Get Left – Greg Callaghan’s Fitness Training Routine


If you simply want to become a better rider and up your trail game plus decrease your risk of injury then read on and learn from EWS athlete Greg Callaghan

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How to ride steep terrain with Kirt Voreis


In these three short How To videos, Kirt Voreis goes through the finer points of riding steep drops, riding steep terrain, and doing wall rides. Press play, watch, and learn.

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Jeff Lenosky Trail Boss Series tackles Florida’s Carter Road


This latest Jeff Lenosky Trail Boss episode comes from Loyce C. Harpe Park near Lakeland, Florida. It’s a place Lenosky calls one of his favorite places to ride in the Sunshine State.

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Build a bombproof, cost-effective winter drivetrain


Winter; when roads covered in ice mixed with salt, conditions like these are not great for metal grinding on metal, ie, your bike’s drivetrain.

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  • Shark says:

    Shimano XT cassette, < $65.

  • Rhone Betrault says:

    Subjecting a very nice ride to salt, cold and grime…
    After spending around $350 to “winterize” it…
    For less worries pickup a beater bike for under $50… and save your other ride.

  • Rick says:

    @Shark
    Marketing folks rack their brains to upsell everyone on more gears nobody asked for and you’re suggesting “outdated junk”. You’d better be quiet there. Take it for the team and support economy.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      >>Marketing folks

      I would like to thank marketing folks for 1x drivetrains. And big tires, and dropper posts and brakes that work. 🙂

  • Rabob says:

    This is the dumbest thing I’ve ever read. Replace all the super high end parts on your bike with cheap parts! WTF..to “save” them? It’s a mountain bike, it’s literally designed to be ridden around in dirt.

  • jrp says:

    Indeed, build the whole beater bike. A heavy, reliable beast of a hardtail with cheapest drivetrain that still works. Bonus points for singlespeeding. Then realize you only need lighter tires to have fun on it come summer. Sell the nice rig.

    And hey, I’ve been riding 1x before it was cool!

  • jabpn says:

    I’ve got to admit, as a winter rider, I’m surprised by this list. When it comes to winter riding, yes, the salt, slush and temperature swings from going outside to inside and back, indeed reeks havoc on bicycle components. However, many of the parts listed here are head scratchers. First of all, the wider the spacing between actual gear cogs and a thicker chain help a lot over newer drivetrains due to the increased clearance for snow and ice to escape. Even then, it’s not uncommon to lose gears due to the chain skipping off of iced up cogs.
    Another common issue is the clogging of swivel points on brake arms and derailleurs. As such, I’d think that Shimano Acera, Altus, Alivio, Sora, Clarus, SRAM 3x/5x, or Tekro would be the go to mentions for parts on a winter bike. These lines may be the lowest in their respective manufacturer’s lineups but they are lower end “high quality”, products (unlike say Shimano Tourney – dept. store bikes). The point is, for winter riding where you do have to deal with thick snow days, sub 20 temps and so on, you will be dealing with seized parts, and when WD-40 or PB Blaster don’t work to free those parts up, well, $10-$30 replacement parts is a whole lot easier to swallow and “better” parts are no better at preventing issues.

    • maaakaaa says:

      Jabpn, I think what you suggest makes a lot of sense if you are building a bike around winter riding, but may be less cost-effective and more work to retrofit. If you are running a 1×11 or 1×12 for example, switching to a lower end like Altus or X3 would require replacing the shifter as well, and would significantly change your gearing as you lose the larger cassette cogs.

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Why diet when your bike can lose weight for you?


This time of year most of us are trying to figure out how to shed the five pounds of tenacious baby fat that clawed its way back over the holidays. Here’s a more entertaining way to lose weight.

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  • John Richter says:

    I’m bad at math – Bike Weight B-4 and After.

  • Chris Pincetich says:

    Check out WREN – their stem is even lighter than ENVE and been great after a year of abuse on my Giant Trance. The least expensive upgrade on my Trance to shed weight was replacing the lock-on grips for ESI, and I love their squish!

  • Sun says:

    Check out the KS Lev CF. It works very well and dropped 1/3# over my previous dropper.

    The extra speed was mostly the tires rolling better (unrideable tires imo), a bit the rims, and mostly the extra stoke provided with the new parts.

  • tedtoo says:

    I’m calling BS on this.

    “Taking 5 pounds off a bike is like losing 20 pounds off the body,” BS – if you actually lost 20 pounds you would definitely feel the difference! But 5 pounds on a bike is negligible. It is the total combined weight of rider and bike that matters. if anything, losing 5 pounds off the rider would be more effective – less dead weight means more energy for the system overall (this is not the same as 5 pounds off the bike either – the bike is suspended under the rider and does not circulate blood nutrients etc).

    “On his first ride out he set multiple PRs…. slashed 40 minutes total off his typical times” BS – based on 5 pounds of weight loss to a bike? To achieve anything like this, the rider would need to have been dragging a tractor tyre behind them on the pre-PR runs.

    All of this is quite apart form the fact that it is not even the same bike he started with.
    1) a Vigilante 2.3 tyre does not equal a Ranger 2.25, so no where near comparable
    2) WTB wheels to Sram Rise, different internal width means totally different ride.
    3) 140 fork to 120 travel changes the geometry of the bike

    If what he is really saying is “I have gone from a hefty trail bike to a reasonably svelt XC bike and it flys” then there may be something in this. But suggesting losing weight off a bike results in faster PRs per se is BS. Losing weight off the body is always more effective (for trail and xc – maybe not so much for chairlift DH).

    But, even going from trail/enduro/DH rig weight to xc changes the ride quality so much that you couldn’t drop in with the same confidence and thus times could even be slower rather than faster – unless of course you were riding you trail/enduro/DH rig on xc tracks in the first place!

  • Sun says:

    Dropping that sort of weight off the tires and wheels feels pretty different. Ride an enduro rig then jump on a XC rig. It’s not a subtle difference!

  • Neil Ross says:

    Reality check: Is it my imagination or in the second to last photo in this article–the one where Jason is running around some sort of course–is there a floating red motorcycle in the background just to the left of the center of the shot?

  • Swen says:

    What is this “air can” that was removed from the new shock? Both shocks are air sprung – its an extra oil reservoir that was lost.

  • LiquidSpin says:

    What happens if you weigh 143lbs and ride a 26.1 lbs trail/all mountain rig with 150mm full suspension travel? You’d think i’d be one hell of a fast rider….but alas it all comes down to how strong you are cardiovascular wise as well as how skilled you are as a rider. But if you’re just comparing yourself to yourself well then yeah you’re going to be faster 🙂

  • Dtimms says:

    Man, this is great! I can be a fat JERRY on a blinged out bike!

  • Xenocatalyst says:

    Its Cheaper and and easier to shed wait from your body.
    I’ve lost 15 kg through diet alone and it hasn’t cost me a thing.

  • Highway Star says:

    Imagine how much weight he could have saved with 26″ wheels.

  • Bryan says:

    I replaced my rear torque sleeve bearings with titanium for only $90 and saved an amazing three quarters of a gram. Now I can eat as much ice cream as I want!

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Winterize your bike now!


We know you’re not ready for winter, but is your bike? Let us help winterize your rig and get you on the trails this winter and off the trainer.

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5 clothing hacks to save your winter rides


Pedaling through the heart of winter is hard enough. Here’s how to make it easier.

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Breathe new life into your old winter shoes


Winter cycling shoes can be expensive and are not the most glamorous item. Here are five ways to bring your old winter cycling shoes back to life so you can save money for more compelling purchases.

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