Lights Shootout Reviews and News


Review: Cygolite Dash 450


The Dash 450 from Cygolite offers a unique form factor with four auxiliary LEDs to complement the main lens.

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Review: Bontrager Ion 700 RT


Going up in price with a sophisticated remote, the Ion 700 RT is the same compact light that can now be part of a unified system of lights.

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  • Chad says:

    Small correction for the article. There is a helmet mount available for the 700 Ion now.
    http://www.bontrager.com/model/13492

  • don says:

    There is also a “blendr” accessory available by bontrager that lets you mount and vertically pivot the light when attached to a stem. Still one of the best lights at 50% of a car headlight’s power output. There is a non RT (remote transmission) white ion700 for about 30 dollars less.

  • David Wayne says:

    700 lumens is irrelevant in my book. The main attraction to this light is remote control so you can quickly turn it off when riding into a jogger, hiker, walker in the dark on a trail. How many people swear at you when your head lights blind them. That’s why I purchased this set of 700RT, tail light and remote.
    But, sadly, there are problems with 700 RT. Northwest rain, I think, leaked into the tail light and now it’s useless. That’s OK, I thought. The head light works remotely and that’s the main thing. But I found that battery would die without notice, three times. Third time, I have been unable to recharge 700 RT. Trek makes great bikes. But they don’t know how to make great bike lights, yet. It’s a great, great idea. Very needed, I think.

  • David Weir says:

    when I use the ion700Rt it gets quite hot when it is let on ridding for say more than a few minutes is this typical for this unit to get hot

  • Manny says:

    I had issues with the lights randomly blinking, turning themselves on, 2.5 hours or less duration for the headlight (lowest setting), and water shorting out my rear light in Japan. (It was not the recall series) Bontrager changed out the set when I returned. Though not sure if lights will turn on again on their own (could have been a frequency issue in Japan?) they definitely changed the rubber cover on the rear lights charging port as it’s beefier and less flimsy . I hope the headlight has a longer illum time.

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Review: CatEye Volt 6000


The brightest light we’ve ever tested also has the widest beam. And it has a trick up its sleeve, an integrated cooling fan. But is it flawed or perfect for trail use?

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  • SGK says:

    This lumen war is getting silly and dangerous. Blind cars, trail user… I could see some user getting sued by blinding some causing the to fall.

  • toddonbike says:

    The cool thing about night riding is riding in the dark. With all these high lumen lights around it could be brighter than daylight. I guess it just goes along with everybody taming down the trails. This sport is just getting too easy.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      >>The cool thing about night riding is riding in the dark.

      Maybe. But really, the cool thing about night riding is you get to ride your bike when the days are so short.

      This has nothing to do with taming trails.

      This is all about choice. Just like having those very capable full-suspension bikes. It’s good that riders have the choice to ride fast and at a very high level. Or the rider can choose a hardtail and a 400 lumen light. That’s fine as well.

  • NotAnotherHill says:

    I appreciate the reviews, but why don’t you test the light output at multiple levels? Also test the actual run time, preferably at multiple levels. This would be very useful information.

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>I appreciate the reviews, but why don’t you test the light output at multiple levels? Also test the actual run time, preferably at multiple levels. This would be very useful information.

    We used to test output levels but they are very random among manufacturers. Some have two and others have five. Some have medium at 50%. Or 60% or 30% so it ends up not being useful.

    Run time is a cluster too. There is no good standard when the light is considered dead. Some shut the light down at 80% brightness, some at 50%. Some step down the light to the lower level.

  • Catmando says:

    The tech behind this lamp I find intriguing. Looks like it is using some sort of massive sized emitter. I can’t help but wonder why Cateye figured someone might want a lamp with 6000 lumen of output that is basically a flood beam pattern ( or so I’m led to believe ). My experience with any type of bike light tells me that if you are going to create a VERY bright bike light MOST of that light should project into the distance. Too much light in the foreground and the reflective bounce back glare becomes detrimental. At 6K lumen I can only imagine how annoying that would be. Maybe if Cateye cuts back the output and creates a lamp with more distance throw it might actually be worth buying.

    • BlackBean says:

      Spot lights are for fast riding, and mostly road riding because you move much faster than on the mountain. For mountain biking, a flood beam is much better. This light was made with mountain bikers in mind.

      • BigDaddy says:

        “Catmando” is correct–This light has WAY TOO MUCH light in the foreground at the highest power setting and it’s easy to outrun this light due to the lack of throw. I think the biggest deal-breaker, however, is the incredibly noisy fan that is always running at the same setting regardless of power level. Yes, it’s THAT loud.

  • fasterjason says:

    The original Cateye Stadium came out around 1998, it was about 500-600 lumen and took about eight hours to charge, ballast was integrated (hard to fit in a frame) .
    The Cateye Stadium 3 came out in 2000, and had 1500 lumen and a three hour charge time, ballast was separate.
    I had both and the Stadium 3 was a game changer. Still have my Stadium 3 and it still works, just not as bright and run time is two hours now. Not bad for a 15 year old light.

  • Jeremy Ellis says:

    Francis,
    Can you please set ALL of your lights up at once? If you have a library system set up, I would like to “check out” this light for use. πŸ™‚

  • CaveMan says:

    I use a combo of Maxx -D and Volt 1600 to give me the throw and width I need. Both come in way under the cost of the volt 6000 and are more than sufficient for lighting up pitch black complex trails. I cannot help thinking Cateye have gone overboard with this one but at least they are innovating. The price rules out normal consumers.

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Review: Lupine Piko 4 Smartcore


From its humble beginnings of 550 Lumens, the new Lupine Piko 4 now sports 1500 Lumens, a wireless remote and smartphone app.

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Review: CandlePower Tech TrailTorch TT3000


With the highest levels of US craftsmanship, CandlePower Tech delivers a light with a very bright and even beam pattern. The GoPro compatible mounting is a big plus as well.

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  • MBR says:

    Run time on high for almost all these mega bright lights would get you thru about one nighttime lap at a 24 hour race. Please, please, please provide run times at other lower power settings.

  • visegripmikey says:

    Most lights that are just high/medium/low are typically 50% medium, Low 25%. So with this light 750 lumens on low will get you about 6 hours.

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2016 Bike Lights Shootout: Headlights


2016 is an exciting year for lights with brighter lights, more affordable options and new features such as wireless. Check back often to see the latest lights reviews.

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  • Peper says:

    I love the NightRider lights. 700 Lumina on helmet and Pro 2400 on bars. Puts out sooo much light on high that you can actually see the leaves wilting on the trees and bushes next to the trail…..JK You can’t out run the lights.

  • Matt says:

    I’m surprised the latest 2016 XML-3 Dinotte was not included. I know it’s listed as a 2016 but I believe the 2015 was tested in this review. The 2016 version now produces 2,000+ claimed lumens with 2.5hrs claimed on high and 1,400 lumens on medium with 5hrs runtime. That runtime is exactly what I need and it’s still in the same small form factor light head and battery. The new battery has 10% more claimed capacity and I’ve been wanting to buy a second battery for a long time. I think this is the push I needed. It should take my 2015 XML-3 at 1,500 lumens up to at least 4hrs if not 4.5hrs on high. Knowing myself, I’ll probably buy the second battery…. with a new 2016 light head attached lol.

    The reason I didn’t buy the more powerful XML-4 was that it was a little bigger (not a deal breaker by any means), but it also used the same battery and had a considerably shorter runtime which was the deal breaker. 1.5hrs and 2,100 lumens or 3hrs and 2,000 lumens and $30 cheaper . Easy choice. I wonder if the XML-4 is going to get the same update treatment.

    I also love my Lumina for helmet mount, I don’t think it gets any better when all things are considered but I like my Dinotte considerably better for the bars over anything I’ve owned from Niterider. I feel like Dinotte is really over engineered and I like that the LEDs are only run a 50% capacity when on high. I guess that’s why they run 3-4 LEDs where some use only one of the same type of LED for similar output. But, to be fair, all of my Niteriders have been flawless as has my Dinotte. Not to start a Dinotte vs Niterider war, both are very good lights and both excel in different areas.

  • bike rider says:

    What happened to the Bar Charts you used to have? Price, $ per gram, lumens per gram, lumens per $, stuff like that? Did you get in trouble with the manufacturers? πŸ˜€

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2016 Bike Lights Shootout: Lumen Measurements


Mtbr measures actual Lumen output of bike lights by going to special laboratories that have an integrating sphere to measure actual Lumen output. See all the Lumen graphs here.

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2016 Bike Lights Shootout: Beam Patterns


A picture is worth a thousand words right? And with bike lights, beam pattern photos tell a very good story. See all the beam pattern photos here.

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  • JIM says:

    curious why the beam shot backyard photo of the cateye volt 800 does not even come close to the light and motion urban 850 trail or the niterider oled 800 yet they all tested around 800 lumens thanks for your time

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      JIM, not sure but shall doublecheck and reshoot. The Volt has narrower bearm pattern and it may be aimed too high in this photoshoot, putting most of its light on the tree above.

  • Craig Ricker says:

    The Candlepower TT3000, looks to have very little light in comparison to the TrailLED DS, although both are supposedly rated at 3000 lumens. What is the actual output of the TT3000?

    • Elvis Tam says:

      I had the same reaction as well. Also why is the Candlepower the only one that is shot much closer then the other ones that have equal lumen supposedly?

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2015 Bike Lights Shootout


The 2015 Bike Lights Shootout is here! It is quite an exciting crop of lights as lights are getting lighter with improved beam patterns. Check back often to see the latest lights reviews.

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  • Pascal Laverdure says:

    Like to see the shootout, but it is a lot of info to go thru. Do you to a summary for specifically what to look for, best versus best value with top threes in say 100, 500, 1500 and 2000+ categories? Unfortunately I can’t read thru all patterns, lumens tests and reviews to see which are worth looking at…thanks!

  • sp00n says:

    Can you replace the graphs with larger versions that are actually readable? Even the ones in the gallery are too small to read (e.g. the Lumens per Dollar).

  • Headfirst! says:

    I’ll have to admit, I’m pretty ridiculous with my MTB expenditures, and when everyone was taping flashlights to their bike, I was hopping on the wagon with the magicshine mj808 on my helmet, and (I can’t remember the model number) the three cluster light on my handlebar. That seems like so long ago, and I’ve since upgraded to the one that looks like two owl eyes (forgot that model number too), but I’ll never forget my first ride with the Trail LED Halo! My friends used to say that I looked like a freight train coming through the woods…now they really don’t have words to describe except some guys have started riding that never had, and still don’t have lights, and they just go off of the light I’m putting out. Now I still run the highest power magicshine that I have (I think it was claimed 2200 lumens), and I believe in running a handlebar mount because it’s always pointed where your bike is, but the Halo absolutely drowns it out! The reason I believe in running both is because you’re supposed to look ahead at what you are going to ride in 30-40 feet, not right down at your wheel. With that combo, I ride like it’s daytime…that’s the best way I can put it. It’s daylight!

    Here’s the drawbacks…you constantly have to turn it down so you don’t (literally) blind your riding mates when you pause. It takes a little while to get the mounting right, and it was worth getting a different helmet to just leave it on there and have that as my night riding helmet. Lastly, if there’s a lot of fog or a lot of dust, it’s kinda like driving a car in dense fog or snowfall…it does no good to run high beams. But, turning the intensity down helps quite a bit.

    Notice I didn’t put the price down as a shortcoming. I think for something as powerful, fast charging (you could ur a 24 hour race with just two packs with the 1:1 charging time), excellent clearance over your head, and basically more light than your car will produce with the brights on, it’s worth every bit! Besides, it’s a quality product made right here in the US! No, I’m not a spokesperson not am I profiting from this post, but it’s worth looking at any of the Trail LED products, and it’s hard to believe the Halo isn’t in this shootout. Why would the guys that make cheaper products try to replicate it of it’s not on this review, setting the bar for bike light performace since it has been in production?!

  • Bill says:

    Dynamo lights are finally getting useful for my old eyes; I’d love to see a section on them and another on rear/turn signal lights. Thanks for your work!

  • Richard says:

    I was wondering about LED color. Higher lumen levels with no cost increase can be achieved simply by using a bluer LED. I find the blue colors to make it difficult to discern detail even though the lumen levels are higher. Are all of these lights comparable with respect to their LED color? Thanks!

  • bbb says:

    I really appreciate the amount of effort that goes into these shootouts, but holy crap is this a lot of data to go though. A table format like the one they use at OutdoorGearLab would be really nice for this. I also think it would be really helpful to only list (or list separately) the lights for actual trail riding, as that is (probably) what most of us are interested in. Tail lights, commuter lights, and other “to be seen” equipment are all pretty standard stuff (basically anything will work), and not really that useful for mountain biking.

    It would also be great to have more info regarding helmet mounting options. I’ve tried riding with lights on the bars, but to me they’re borderline useless if you have a decent helmet light, especially on twisty/technical trails, plus helmet lights allow you to look further out or closer in depending on your speed, which you can’t do at all with bar lights. A good, low(ish) profile, easy-to-use helmet mount is worth a lot to me.

    It would be great to have something like “best helmet mount”, or “best buy if you’re only using one light”.

    But enough of that. It’s a really impressive shootout you put together and the data is very helpful. Just some thoughts/wishes, maybe for next year (take it or leave it).

  • Brent says:

    It would be great to know which lights have available mounts to fit 35mm bars!

  • BenH says:

    A review score sorted summary would be great. It’s awesome so many lights were reviewed by it’s pretty difficult to find the 5 chilis reviews and there are just too many lights to go through them all.

  • Craig says:

    I really like the annual light shootout. I do however miss the tunnel photos. They are much easier to compare the lights. The yard shot is too close to the fence to compare the brighter lights.
    Thanks MTBR

  • bill says:

    great reviews! I would also love to see a comparison chart for battery life. I’m shopping for a light that will work 8+ hours

  • Camden says:

    You forgot at least one! What about Klarus?

  • Lynn says:

    Hope everything goes well.

    This is Lynn, from Marketing Department of WowsBox. We see your professional review about bike headlight, just wondering would you like to try our new developed headlight stand and help to make a review for us? http://amzn.to/2p8eikd

    Sincerely hope we will have the opportunity to cooperate with you. Please kindly let us know your US address if you are interested in, we will send the sample out. We will be really appreciated for your kind reply.

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Review: Lezyne Power Drive XL


This light faces some stiff competition now, but it has a big beam pattern and it can run a long time if you pack extra batteries.

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Review: Lumicycle Explorer Enduro Pack


It’s a bright and wide light from the UK and it has a cool switch and a well-constructed head unit.

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Review: Knog Blinder Road 3


This is a cool little package from Knog. It’s ideal as a ‘to be seen’ light but it can be used to see with in a pinch.

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Review: Knog Blinder Arc 1.7


This Knog light is not powerful at all, but one can get home with it. Ergonomics and design is quite slick and it’s only $65.

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Review: DiNotte XML-4


The Dinotte XML-4 puts out 2110 Lumens and its a good deal at $259, but is it as compelling as the Dinotte XML-3?

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  • Gator says:

    Looks like a really well made USA light, might check one out!! Battery needs to be bigger.

  • bk says:

    I just bought an XML-3 and was disappointed to see that the charger and battery both have ‘Manufactured in Taiwan’ printed on them. Not sure about the light head since it doesn’t state anything, but I was expecting the entire package to be made in the US.

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Review: Lezyne Super Drive XL


$120 for a 709 Lumen light is not the brightest or the cheapest, but this light has field replaceable batteries if you need really long run times.

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Review: CatEye Volt 100


It’s a ‘to be seen’ light for $35. But since it’s a CatEye, it over delivers and you can actually see with it.

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Review: NiteRider Lumina 400


This $68 light puts out 445 Lumens and it has all the quality and design features of the modern NiteRider Lumina lights.

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  • MacBike Pro says:

    IMO, turning on in low-beam is not a weakness. I’d prefer to start at a more efficient setting and boost light if necessary. We MTB all seasons, and we often start at dusk, and full light isn’t needed then anyway. Same on the road.

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Review: Light & Motion Urban 500


This light has good beam pattern and side visibility at a $100 price point. But the competition has caught up in terms of size, price and brightness.

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Review: Lupine Piko 4


The Lupine Piko 4 remains as one of the most useable helmet lights we’ve tested as it delivers 1120 Lumens in a 180 gram package.

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Review: Lezyne Deca Drive


This Deca Drive is largely unchanged from last year, but it’s still one of the better self-contained bar lights around since it has a lovely beam pattern for $160.

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Review: CatEye Volt 1200


The CatEye Volt 1200 sports 1253 measured Lumens for $200. It’s a good choice if you’re not in a hot night riding area like Arizona.

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Review: Light & Motion Taz 1200


The good news on the Light & Motion Taz 1200 is the price dropped from $300 to $240. The bad news is the run time remained the same at 1:30 hours on high, but it still has one of the best beam patterns around.

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Review: Lupine Wilma 7


The output is a staggering 2770 measured Lumens and the weight is just 360 grams. Couple that with long run times and a fast charge time and we’re ready to crown this high-end champ of the lights arena.

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  • DrDon says:

    I’m running this light with a Piko on the helmet. Very nice. My Seca 700 was becoming dated, but it produces a better beam pattern. A Seca 2000 on the bars and a Trail LED DS would be an cool combination, but the Lupines are more versatile and the quality high. Evening laps around the metro park with the Piko on my road bike bar. Night hikes with the Piko or the Wilma on a head mount. I use the larger batteries because I use a pack and I don’t care about weight and I do like the brightness. Are they worth it? Well, the L&M lamp produces such a good beam pattern with lower lumens and you can find the older model on sale, so I would say no, unless you want the smallest and the lightest package with jewel like refinement.

  • BobS says:

    You can get them from Gretna Bikes (google it, but I think it’s http://www.gretnabikes.com). Dan and the others there are great.

    I’ve got two Wilmas, one that I bought maybe 7 years ago, and the newer model about a year ago. These things are crazy bright, and allow me to descend at full clip without fear of “going faster than my light”… the light extends out far enough that I see everything.
    What I REALLY like about Lupine is the upgrade-ability. I got a new lamp assembly for my older one and boosted the light output from ~990 lumens to closer to 2000. The kit cost me about $130 – and the old light got a new lease on life. I’m also STILL using the original batteries I bought way back then. Just a quality system, all the way around. Nice thing is that when I first asked my wife if I could get one, but was concerned about the cost, she said “how much would it cost if you crashed because of not enough light?” Yup, worth every penny.

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Review: Serfas USL-305


Delivering 371 Lumens at $50, this minimalist light from Serfas delivers an incredible value. It’s a great commuter light, but it’s got potential as a supplementary trail light too.

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Review: Blackburn Central Front


It’s constructed well and it features a simple rotary switch. Plus it can dim automatically when ambient light is bright.

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