27.5+ / 29+ Reviews and News


Schwalbe Nobby Nic Plus review


The Schwalbe Nobby Nic is a popular all around tread that’s gotten the Addix compound treatment and larger sizing options, including the 27.5×2.8 that is tested here.

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  • Shark says:

    I ran the 27.5×3″ version until I wore out the rear one.
    They are ok, but not a great front tire. They give little to no warning when it’s going to let go when riding anything except perfect hero dirt.
    It’s not a bad rear tire.
    Do yourselves a favor and go with a maxxis HRII up front instead.

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WTB Ranger Plus review


Whether heading out on a multi-day bikepacking adventure or just a quick after work trail spin, the WTB Ranger Plus is billed as a do-it-all fast rolling tire.

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  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    I’ve been riding 29×3.0 Light WTB Rangers since they first came out a couple of years ago and I’ve been suprised how well they perform. They roll very fast, even on pavement. They are suprising durable for such a light tire. I haven’t ripped one yet and it is rocky and rooty where I live. Even though they have shallow knobs they seem to last as long as other tires. Switch out your heavy, slow-rolling, Enduro-ish tires for a set of Light Rangers and you will give your bike a new livelier personality.

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Vee Crown Gem Plus review


The Vee Crown Gem Plus is designed to handle everything from all-mountain shredding to endurance XC racing.

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  • Chris says:

    That is one horrible tire profile. Too round, knobs lack the necessary height to get the ground.

  • DMP says:

    For a 2.8, these are a wide tire. I had them on WTB Scraper i40 rims, and they actually measured 3″ wide. I was happy with the volume and the traction, but I started having cornering knobs tear off of the rear tire around 100 miles in. After 300 miles I had lost some on the front as well. By 400 miles the rear tread was worn enough and the spots of exposed casing where the knobs had torn off were fraying enough to merit replacement.

    Despite the fact that they didn’t last very long I would have gone with them again if not for the issue with the cornering knobs ripping off. Not sure if if’s a manufacturing issue or design defect, but it’s too bad.

    I replaced them with a set of Maxxis Rekon 2.8 EXO 3C MaxTerra 60-tpi skinwall tires. The rubber on those seems a little more durable, but I pinched flatted the sidewalls on both of them right away running them at the same pressure as the Crown Gems. The Maxxis 2.8s measured a little under 2.8″ wide, and needed a slightly higher pressure.

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Bontrager XR4 Team Issue TLR review


The Bontrager XR4 Team Issue TLR may not be the fastest on pedal heavy sections of trail or fire roads, but when your bike is pointed downhill into gnarly roots and slick rocks, this is a great tire to have.

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  • ColinL says:

    Only the plus sizes cost that much. The XR4 2.4 is $55 which is a bargain. They do wear fast on the rear, but not noticeably fast (to me) on the front.

  • root says:

    Um, pretty much all premium MTB tires cost more than low end car tires. Low end car tires are cheap, and ride like krap. I bought a set just to get my car rolling (which for the set was cheaper than the set of tires on my MTB) and gave them away as soon as I could. They drove horribly, I considered them almost dangerous.

  • N says:

    I’ve got the 60TPI 29×2.6 version of these on my Krampus. Seems pretty similar to DHF/DHR for knob height and pattern, maybe not quite as tall of knobs. Definitely more traction than the 29×3 Chupacabras I ran on the original build.

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    Nice to see that this tire is true to size. A true 2.8 tire should measure 2.8in on an i40mm rim and 2.75in on an i35mm rim. Bontranger tires are usually the most expensive tires you can get. I think Trek makes them for their new bikes but doesn’t expect to sell many as replacements. There are many other similar great tires of this type for much less money and especially if you buy them online. The 27×2.8 Maxxis Minions are one example which you can find online for about $75.

  • James says:

    Have this tire on front (it’s a 26 x 2.35). Bought is for $55 CAD several years ago.
    Love this tire absolutely awesome. Way waaaay better than the Nevegal it replaced.
    Never lost traction ever, loose or hardpack up or down or around.
    Long wearing too no torn knobs, sidewalls tough.
    Paired up with an XR3 on the rear is a great combo !

  • Matthew says:

    Not a fan of this tire. Came stock on my Fuel EX8. Anything but perfect conditions and they really want to slip and slide all over the place. Even on just humid days with no rain they won’t grab tree roots or rocks. Won’t stay on off camber rocks in any conditions and just generally are unpredictable. Tried many different combos of air pressure and while it helped these tires won’t be on the bike come next spring. I will say they are right on the money in sizing. On the i29mm rim they are exactly 2.4 and the I’ve had 0 problems with punctures or holding air pressure so there is that.

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Maxxis Rekon+ review


The Maxxis Rekon+ is an aggressive trail tire inspired by the Ikon+ for intermediate and technical terrain.

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  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    I sure would like to see Maxxis produce a 29×2.8 version of this tire. 29er’s need more 2.8in wide tire choices. And of course, I would want it to measure a true 2.8in when mounted on an i40 rim (or 2.75in when mounted on an i35 rim).

  • Jason says:

    This tire came on my Scott Spark 720.. In the NE it’s one rock garden after another..The tire is great!!!

  • Ben says:

    I switched to the Recon+ (71-584) from the WTB Bridger on my hardtail last fall. Also changed from tubes to tubeless. Absolute night and day difference. i35 rims. 19 psi rear, 17 front. Rider weight is 165 lbs. Dropped 2.25 lbs off the bike. The tires completely changed how the front fork felt and how the bike handles. Traction improved dramatically. Corners where the Bridger would wash out, the Recon+ grabbed all the way through. When I purchased my full suspension bike this spring, I had the LBS swap the Bridgers for the Recon+ and run 16PSI front, 18 rear, tubeless. The FS bike has i45 rims. Maxxis states to run these tires on i39 or wider, but I do like the way they work on the i35 vs i45. The i45 does widen the tire to 2.7″ vs. the 2.6″ on the i35. Purchase price was closer to $80 per tire for the 780 gram version. Between the two bikes I have approximately 600 miles on the Recon+ tires. The wear has been acceptable, better than the Bridgers. I definitely recommend.

  • kyle242gt says:

    I’ve got about 1K miles on my front 27.5*2.8, only just starting to show undercutting on the side knobs. I predict another 500++ miles out of it.
    I run a 27.5*2.6 on the rear, at about 800 or so, no notable wear yet.
    Compared to the Ardents I’ve used previously, these things wear like iron.
    Only issue I’ve found is they load up with mud pretty fast.

  • josh says:

    I’m running the 2C “2.8” (actually 2.67″) version on the back of my hardtail. It’s probably halfway worn out but it has served me quite well thus far. Local dude uses this tire front and rear with excellent and fast (Strava!!!) results. Might use a 3C version up front when my current HRII wears out.

  • MDW says:

    I agree with the comments above. Switched to these (780gram version) from the 3″ Nobby Nics that came on my 2017 Cannondale Bad Habit 1 Carbon with 40mm wide carbon rims. Totally impressed with the speed and climbing abilities of 27.5 plus. Mine measure just a tad under the 2.8″ width.

    When plus started to gain momentum in 2015/2016, the number of tire choices was very sparse. Now there are plenty of choices with very little weight penalty. Life is good!

  • MDW says:

    You can buy online for around $75 a tire.

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    Hey, isn’t a tire that measures 2.6 on an i35 rim the definition of a 2.6 tire? A true 2.8 tire should measure 2.75 on an i35 rim (or 2.8 on an i40 rim). Is this tire mislabeled? Maxxis makes a 27×2.6 Rekon also. Maybe the 2.6 and the 2.8 are both the same tire! Is Maxxis scamming?

    • Ben says:

      Just a guess, but I would expect the sidewall heights to be different between the 2.6 non plus and the 2.8 plus measuring out at 2.6 width. Has anyone measured? My FS with the i45 is in the shop right now, but I can put a caliper on it when I get it back. Still need to change my hardtail back to the Rekon+ for dirt (use homemade studded WTB Rangers for snow/ice, and WTB Bridgers for snow/slush/dry pavement during the shoulder ride seasons when the off road is closed).

    • Ben says:

      Put the Rekons back on my Hardtail tonight an put the caliper o. To measure the height difference between the 3.0 Bridger and 2.8 Rekon. The Rekon is about a 1/2″ shorter sidewall so about an inch smaller diameter. So maybe you are right. I took pictures and will add them to my mtbr folder.

    • Mark says:

      They are not the same width. I run a 27.5×2.8 on the back and a 29×2.6 on the front, and the difference in width (and ride characteristics) is clear.

  • Ben says:

    Update – 500 miles on the Rekon+ on i45 rims, the rear now measures 2.8″ and the front 2.7″. So I guess they stretch with use…

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Whyte Bikes S-150C RS aggressive trail bike – video


The 2018 Whyte S-150C RS is an aggressive trail bike with the ability to switch between 29er and 27.5+ wheels.

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Pivot Switchblade Aluminum launched


Pivot has debuted a more affordable aluminum version of its Switchblade trail bike that brings the same innovative geometry, suspension, and on-trail performance to a wider audience.

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Fezzari Signal Peak bridges XC-trail gap


Fezzari’s new Signal Peak artfully blends speed and fun. It’s fast on technical terrain, drops, and rock gardens, and climbs like a mountain goat.

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BMC enters e-bike market with AMP Trailfox and Speedfox


Trailfox AMP and Speedfox AMP designed to conquer everything from challenging climbs to swooping singletrack descents.

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  • Bob says:

    “Like them or not e-bikes are here and they are improving every year. ”

    Great! They can stay in Europe where they won’t cause unnecessary trail access issues for cyclists. (people who choose to not ride mopeds).

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Jamis Bikes releases new 3VO suspension platform


Jamis Bikes new 3VO design dropping at Sea Otter claims a unique instant center, center of curvature and axle path that is said to eliminate unwanted motion when pedaling.

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  • smoothmoose says:

    Interesting take on dual pivot design. New bikes don’t seem pushing the LLS geo much. But interested in hearing the ride reports.

  • Doodgehull says:

    Holy Batman of chain growth,

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>Holy Batman of chain growth,
    You have info on this? Do tell.

  • benito says:

    I’d hate to admit I’d ever buy a bike based on how it looks but these certainly seem like a big step forward aesthetically. At least compared to Jamis’s DS options over the past few years.

  • Tom says:

    Go Chris! Should be called “Speedgoat Sus” though.

  • ezE says:

    tanks for keeping 26’rs alive!

  • dave says:

    Holy cow! I had a Jamis with a single pivot and after 4 warranty rear triangles got rid of it. They couldn’t do a simple single pivot right and now they do this contraption? Good luck!

  • Bnystrom says:

    There appear to be at least 12 bearings in the linkage, plus the top and bottom shock pivots. This may be the “holy grail” of suspension design (who knows?), but how long will it last? I have nothing against Jamis, but like others above, I have one that had a rear triangle issue due to poorly aligned and installed bearings. This one has 50% more bearings, which really makes me wonder.

  • Jase_Rad says:

    Just Another Maintenance Intensive Suspension.

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Cane Creek releases 29/27.5+ HELM fork


Cane Creek Cycling Components has announced the release of the highly anticipated 29/27.5+ version of the HELM suspension fork.

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Trek Full Stache first look


Trek has unveiled a new trail bike with 130mm of front and rear travel and other unique design elements that take the capability of 29-plus tires to the next level.

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  • guysmiley says:

    elevated cs and + tires are here to stay cause it works.

  • Plusbike Nerd says:

    What I like about the Full Stache.

    Pike fork.
    Eagle drivetrain.
    i36 rims which will reasonably accept 2.4-3.0 tires.
    Flip chip raises bottom bracket and also makes it possible to use 2.4-3.0 tires.
    Full Stache is very similar to the excellent 29 Fuel EX but might make the 29 Fuel EX obsolete – especially if you prefer 2.4 or wider tires.

    What I would do differently.

    It would have preferred that this bike came with 2.8 tires. Bontrager please release a 29×2.8 tire
    I would have preferred that this bike came with a longer top tube and a slacker head tube angle.
    I would have preferred if this bike came with a 140mm fork.
    I would have preferred that this bike have a different name. What the heck is a Stache?

  • benito says:

    love the look of the bike. after a couple years now riding many of the wheel/tire size variants out there, I’m not sold on 29+ as an everyday trail bike. But billing this bike as a trail-friendly back country explorer seems right on the mark. I bet it’s a ton of fun.

  • Ben says:

    I was lucky to find a Full Stache at the Trek Superstore in San Diego, great service, twenty hour trip to get the bike, but it was nice to walk on the beach in 80deg weather and shred some trails on the way home.

    Overall I really like the Full Stache, it’s way more capable than the short travel suspension would suggest. The Knockblock is not my fav, but I can deal with it. I’ve been running in the low suspension setting, steering is a tad heavy but that’s to be expected with the large wheels and long front to center.

    Improvements: Shorter stem, 60mm stock is way to long, I’d spec a 50mm and have the shorter and longer options available in house to swap; Trek is out of 50mm and 35mm Line stems which is a problem with the exclusive Knock Block system.

    Shorter cranks, stock on the large frame is 175mm, I’m getting 165mm, but 170mm would make more sense out of the box on a bike with a low bb that is meant for exploring.

    More fork travel, 130mm is okay for an XC bike but the Full Stache is made for going downhill, so I’d spec 140mm; I’ll be upgrading mine soon. I’d also be curious about a reduced offset fork.

    Weight, yeah, the Full Stache is hefty, 34# solid, much of the weight seems to be in the backend. I’d like to see them stay with an aluminum triangle and go with a carbon swingarm, avoiding the price tag of full carbon but dropping weight where it matters.

    Wheels are nice, but the rear hub really needs to be built to last. I’m running custom DT 350/Duroc 40 wheels which improved ride and reduced flex to nil. Reports of frame flex are greatly exaggerated, at 200# with hard riding habits, I don’t notice any flex; it is an 8# frame, how could it be flexy?

    Dropper length, well, I have the inseam for a 175mm, so that’s probably where I’ll go though the Bonty 150mm dropper is functional if you can overlook the awkward lever angle.

    For the price, it’s a solid package. Good on Trek to build on the success of the Stache.

    Hey Trek, what’s with the color scheme, seriously?! That said, it’s a much better looking bike in person, I trimmed mine out with varying shades or green and yellow.

  • Ben says:

    Stache, as in mustache, so a Full Stache is play on words…

    Watch the Trek Video, check out the announcers stache 😉

  • sethroski says:

    for about $40.00 you can swap out air shafts in the Pike fork and change it to either a 140 or a 150 mm travel as I plan on doing this to mine. This also would raise the BB height enough to fit a standard 2.6 tire/wheelset on there if you want. Then you’d have the ultimate quiver killer indeed.

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New colors for Niner RIP 9, JET 9 and RLT 9


Niner is offering new internal cable guides and fresh clean colors to make life easy and a little more colorful.

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Stan’s NoTubes Baron S1 27.5 wheelset review


This well-built, high performing aluminum plus size wheelset will lighten your bike but not your wallet.

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  • gg says:

    Jordan not sure where you got that link, but the correct one is: NOTUBES.COM

  • Evan says:

    Stan’s NEO hubs are crap. Had 2 of them fail in less than a year, both with the same issue. The entire freehub assembly came loose and I couldn’t pedal; both times involved getting stranded with a long hike out. Same thing happened to 2 friends. Great rims, horrible hubs.

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Salsa updates Deadwood, adding alloy version


For 2018, Salsa has updated the Deadwood for a broader range of uses — and budgets.

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Fezzari Cascade Peak 29 Pro first look


Built around their AT529 frame design, 130mm all-mountain bike has adjustable GA-Link geometry to keep a consistent BB height when changing between 27.5+ and 29er set-ups.

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  • RealT says:

    “…35mm stem make the Cascade Peak handle nicely on drops and jumps.” – I bet that’s essential (if mostly to inflate the price).

  • Ray S says:

    Any updates yet? Another review I read said the BB height was WAY lower than advertised.

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Fezzari launches three new alloy 130mm trail bikes


Fezzari has announced three new aluminum mountain bikes: the Cascade Peak, Abajo Peak, and Wiki Peak. All three utilize 130mm of rear travel and can be run as 29er or 27.5 plus.

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  • vern says:

    My take is that the value is really really good, If I were in market I definitely would look at the Cascade Peak Pro…in fact I would just click and buy..insane amount of value for 3400…..eagle, stans, fox,….good warranties……sort of wish I was in market, but I am content with my old bike still……………….
    _______________________________________________________
    Fox Float 34, 29er fork, Performance Elite 3-Mode Fit4 damper, 140mm travel, 1.5 taper, 110x15mm boost thru axle
    Custom tuned Fox Float 3-Mode EVOL rear shock
    SRAM GX Eagle 1×12 drivetrain with 10-50t casette
    SRAM Level T Brakes with Centerline 180mm/160mm rotors
    Stan’s Flow Mk3 tubeless ready wheelset with Stan’s Neo Durasync hub
    Maxxis Minion DHF and DHR 29 x 2.3 Tubeless Ready tires
    Fox Transfer Performance Elite Dropper seat post with 1x lever remote
    Fezzari Charger 35mm alloy bar and stem
    Fezzari lock-on grips

  • P Bish says:

    Has anyone bought one of these lately? Reviews for this brand are non existent.

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Bulls Bike E-Stream review


The biggest battery available and a capable full-suspension platform make this e-bike truly adventure ready.

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  • gg says:

    “AA: Optimal riding conditions is smooth pavement terrain, max tire pressure, no headwinds, and a fairly light rider.”

    What the heck ?

    Pavement “terrain” ? Max tire pressure ? Everything an MTB is NOT !

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      Correct gg. Since they started with commuter e-bikes, they’re using those formulas. We’re hoping they’ll switch to more realistic mountain bike conditions formula soon, albeit more difficult to standardize.

  • jack says:

    Although I have no desire to own an e-bike, I do think it’s a great option for older folks who need the assist and allows them to ride.

  • gg says:

    Francis thanks for clarifying that.
    May also explain why the brand manager is defending the thin tires !

  • Francis Cebedo says:

    >>May also explain why the brand manager is defending the thin tires!

    Yes, I think they’re learning about the spec nuances as they build more of these types of bikes. One of my pet peeves is many manufacturers specify Plus tires for grip and control but then they spec Rocket Ron tires with no knobs (to combat weight and speed concerns).

    Anyway, I mostly rode this bike with 2.8 Maxxis Minions in the front.

  • peter says:

    I too had disdain with ebikes until I had the pleasure of testing one out this year. Wow, Very impressed. I still had to put in the effort and in no way should it be compared to a motorcycle. I predict in a few years they will get the battery size down to make ebikes indistinguishable from regular mountain bikes. and you can count on most folks will go for some type of pedal assist, to have that little umph when they might need it. The bulls bike e stream is a nice looking bike and on the trail most people would have to take a good look to recognize its an ebike. Bottom line is I am all for innovation and opening the doors to allow more folks into our sport.

  • TacoBeer says:

    This has no value to be on MTBR, this is a Mountain mo-ped and belongs on a vehicle/motor type site. Ban e-bike on single track! they should only have reviews on dirt roads or streets where they belong.

  • Brad says:

    The excuse about I am old, I am heavy, I am new, is crap. You either want to ride or you don’t. We have all been new, or out of shape, and we are all growing older. I used to run 7 minute miles on half marathons, I can’t anymore, so do I need battery powered shoes, nope. Our land access is fragile and these bikes are a complete threat to it. This article is complete b.s. on why it will help you ride longer rides and do-once trails can be ridden everyday – I can’t do that on my current bike? Thanks for rolling over… A bicycle is already one of the most efficient machines. On another note, these bikes are officially worse for the environment compared to what we already have. You have to recharge a human powered vehicle???? Then what – in 10 years you have to trash the bike as the batteries are bad and the new batteries don’t work with this bike or the motor die’s? Currently older bikes are easily reused as commuters, or pass me downs. I am disappointed on so many levels…

  • JB] says:

    I am 71 years old and just want to keep riding. I cannot fathom the negativity when all these bikes have is assist used mainly in climbing and achieving greater distances. I am surely not racing anyone down hill. The aggressive riders can tear up trail on any bike, E or otherwise. Seems to me the biggest problem is ego related. Not right that at 71 I might pass your ass going up hill! Get real and let people live!

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Trek Roscoe and X-Caliber hardtails reviewed


Trek’s budget-friendly hardtails have evolved on two distinct paths, an affordable XC steed and a fun trail machine. Born out of the same frame, find out how these two bikes compare.

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  • jc says:

    Some goofy geometry info listed, if indeed they’re the same frame. No way that adding 2cm of travel to the fork will change the seat tube angle by more than 1 full degree – even on the smallest size frame.

  • brian tunney says:

    I’m not a strong enough enthusiast to know a lot about bikes and handling etc…. so I like a bit of the feedback to how the subtle differences can make almost the same bike one format versus the other.

    I’m most impressed with the specs and comments on these as compared to my trail oriented bikepacker or adventure bike, steel, 1×11, Recon, Schwalbe and coming in a shade over 30# at $1199 new, a few months ago.

  • Jon Dahl says:

    I’m thinking about the rear hub “boost” 9*141 ??? Where in the aftermarket can you buy a new rear wheel if it gets broken. Why go back to QR when thru Axel has come to stay…. sad.

  • Bret says:

    Was really tempted by the Roscoe 8…solid build for the price. Ended up stretching the budget a tad more and got Diamondback Release 1…I’m so glad I went full squish.

  • Gordon says:

    I’m somewhere between XC and novice trail. I like long days out in the British country side but also like to dick around on the trails. Does the Rosco also work well on the road as well as the trail? I like the idea of having the dropper post and bigger tyres but suspect this combine with the 1×11 would make it really difficult on a long day out. What are you thoughts?

    • John Mac says:

      Gordon, I’ve got the Roscoe 9 (which is available in the UK) as my do-it-all bike. It handles roads fine albeit not at the pace that a 2-by bike could due to gearing, but where it shines is on climbs with some proper granny gears that help your legs keep churning. The plus size tyres (2.8″ rather than 3.0″ mentioned in the article) also eliminate any concerns over drain grid gaps (the enemy of skinnier hybrid/roadie tyres) and roll over most things with ease. Speaking of roll over, given the plus size tyres, some will say that they roll like 29ers rather than 27.5, but all I can say is that I have not had one single bad ride or found fault with the bike at all so far.

  • Izzy M says:

    The Trek website lists the X-Caliber’s BB as being lower than the Roscoe’s. So the statement about trail hardtails being lower than their XC counterparts isn’t correct in this case.

  • Izzy M says:

    Just found this on the Q&A portion of the X-Caliber on the Trek website:

    Can you swap wheels between 29 and 27.5 plus like on the roscoe models? What is the maximum tire witdh.
    Verified Reply – Luke @ Trek
    No, this is not recommended. The tires will not fit in the frames that already use 27.5″ tires. The 29er X-caliber has less fork travel than the Roscoe which will make the bottom bracket height too low for ideal riding performance if the X-caliber were to use 27.5+ wheels. 2.4″ tires are the maximum recommended tire width for both the 27.5 and 29er X-caliber bikes.

    So apparently, the X-Caliber and Roscoe frames are not the same frame.

    • tom says:

      yes you can swap wheel sizes the boost 141 is the same as 148 but with quick release
      trek has wheel sets ready to go

  • Ricardo Torrado. says:

    Me hice a la roscoe 8, y es destacada su respuesta en caminos difíciles y descensos pedregosos. La supensión es poderosa y la transmisión suave y fiable. La estética es impresionante, generando comentarios de los compañeros de ruta. El precio es mucho menor al de la competencia, y destaca en componentes frente a esta.

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DVO Diamond 110 Boost fork review


It’s not the lightest fork in this class, but the DVO Diamond 110 Boost is bar none one of the best trail/enduro forks we’ve ridden in a long time. Find out why.

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  • Dirt Doyen says:

    Bar None the best fork, shock and seat post I have ridden to date. Ellsworth Epiphany DVO Boost 110 27.5 front, Topaz Rear and Garnet seatpost. THIS COMPANY GETS IT I have called several times with questions on tune and service Ronny has been right there with easy answers and there website is great with DVO rider connect, tuning and service videos and great support. Coming from the big 2 over the last 30 years this has been a breath of fresh air actually getting service instead of send it to us and everything we do is 200.00 or more and 2 to 4 weeks of not riding . My LBS tries their best but they cannot get past it either. The small weight penalty is nothing compared to the serviceability. I have been running this setup since June 4 to 8 hours a week and had no issues at all…Love em so far.

  • bigcol says:

    How funny is it that we are going back to 110 spacing. Up next, 110×20!

  • JP says:

    I appreciate your review. Given that fork reviews are so subjective, it would be nice if suspension reviews start including data that supports the claims of small bump sensitivity and mid-stroke support. I’d rather a fork be hooked up to a machine that showed the characteristics than read a subjective impression of the fork’s properties. It is really a problem with all fork reviews and since often we cannot try a fork before buying it, the more objective the data…the better we could make decisions. Perhaps one of the best fork reviews/comparisons I have read is this one… http://enduro-mtb.com/en/best-160-mm-mtb-fork-can-buy/2/ and the DVO was well rated in that one.

    • keith says:

      This is true for everything in the bike industry. So much marketing-speak and pseudo science. Power transfer, mid-stroke “support”, wallow – what the hell is any of that psycho babble?

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Shift in Perception: An ode to plus bikes


“It’s become apparent to me that the big advantage of running plus tires is the ability to maintain momentum and speed over rough terrain.” — Wade Simmons

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  • Mark says:

    The offspring of the marriage of Plus and Enduro is becoming the new normal trailbike. 6 inches of travel. Downhill geometry yet still climbs. 30-35mm inner width rims. 2.5-2.8in wide tires. This ain’t nuthin’ like the Narrowbikes of just 3 years ago. Some 2018 examples. Pivot Mach 5.5. Scott Genius. Ibis Mojo HD4. Specialized Enduro. I like big wheels. And I cannot lie.

  • Smithhammer says:

    It’s only a matter of time before we evolve past this silly bias that plus bikes are for “beginners.” Of course, most of the people who say such things have spent little, if any, actual time on one.

  • VPJC851 says:

    Have a boost 29r with two sets of wheels (29 and 27.5+). The 29er’s are great for a lot of stuff, but I am sold on the 27.5+. In almost all instances, rolls faster, smoother and as Wade indicated, I am choosing, and enjoying lines I would never have considered on any other wheel. They are just plain fun. As a long time rider of the Shore, (I lived at the base of Fromme and ridden there for decades), I simply can’t say enough about 27.5+ and what it has done for my riding and enjoyment. I’ve ridden every type of bike and wheel and this is simply my favourite. I am able to climb things I wouldn’t have ever made before and the speed on descents is amazing. As mentioned in the article, tire pressure is key and even 1lb difference one way or the other radically changes how the tires perform so if you’re trying a plus, do a solo ride and play with pressure until you have it dialed. I’ve got a plus bike for my wife and the change in her riding has been even greater. I’ll still keep my 29er hoops for super dry summer backcountry adventures, but for day to day, the 27.5+ is the choice.

  • Dean says:

    Couple of rad guys there but I still haven’t figured out why we keep trying to smooth out MTB trails. If you want to ride smooth stuff, go find a smooth trail. Do you advocated taking rocks etc out of trails to smooth them over too?

    • VPJC851 says:

      I don’t think anyone is advocating actually smoothing out trails; I think they are implying how the tires/wheels ‘feel’ and the ability to push even bigger, more challenging lines that simply weren’t possible before which will take riding to an even higher level. One unintended part of the plusses is I truly think I am impacting trails far less; I brake far more smoothly, take straighter lines where lines should be straight and my sense is I am not beating on the trail like with my smaller hoops. I feel like I am way lighter in terms of how I drive the bike into corners or through janky sections; Overall, I ride way quieter which is great from a trail impact and sustainability context. Just sayin’

  • derby says:

    Plus tires have enabled me to try a dirt-moto wheel and tire width setup with nearly the same tire diameters. Currently a 29×2.6 aggressive knob front on Derby 40i rims, and a wider 27.5×2.8 more easy rolling and pedaling smaller knob rear on Derby 45i rims. This combo is easier to ride technical trails than any narrower tires and wheel sizes, neutral balance through gravely corners without the front washing out first, very rocky rooty with more line choices, and climbing steep loose is so much easier with confidence to put more power to the pedals without spinning the rear. The plus tires roll and pedal easier everywhere except pavement, even on hard-pack. I recently tried the same 29/27.5 wheels except 2.6/3.0, wider rear, and climbing gravely steep is even easier than with a 2.8 rear, but I feel more rear float drift in faster loose corners. At the DH park I found a rear 27.5×2.8 Minnion with aggressive tread, to match the aggressive knob 29×2.4 Minnion front tire tread, floats too much and washes the rear for some high speed corners. In my opinion narrower tires up to 2.6 maximum for heavier riders, work better for DH park cornering speeds.

  • WP Mtber says:

    I own a SC Hightower that can run both 27.5+ and 29″ wheels. I originally bought it as a Plus bike and after 6 months, purchased a second set of 29″ wheels (with 2.3 Minions F/B). For a short period, I went back and forth. What I found was that the Plus set really “numbed” the trails. They do roll over & through most anything and certainly provide confidence. I found myself leaving the 29″ wheels on more & more. They forced me to work harder and choose better lines. One of my main purposes for riding is to stay in shape with a full body workout. The 29″ wheels made my upper body work as hard as the lower and I appreciate this facet of riding. The Plus wheel set has been gathering dust in the garage for most of 2017. I probably will replace the front tire with a 2.5 Minion DHF, when I wear out the current 2.3 but that’s about as wide as I want to go.

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Bulls Bikes Interbike 2017


Germany-based bike maker has expanded its offerings with new plus e-bikes, including a women’s specific model.

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Trailcraft Cycles Big Mesa 26+ launched


Trailcraft has unveiled its new Big Mesa 26+ for riders in XS and small sizes wanting true “plus” size tire capability, but in a complete bike package which fits riders from 4’10” to 5’6″.

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Pivot Shuttle e-bike introduced


We’ve often wondered who would be the first among the boutique brands to offer an e-bike. Our questions have been answered as Chris Cocalis of Pivot designed a very intriguing machine.

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  • chase says:

    When is the Ebike whining gonna just stop and realize . They are coming. This one is the best one yet. Doubt I will buy one soon , but it is cool.
    With being an old fat guy with bad knees….the day is coming when this will look great and doable.

    • oze says:

      honestly theyre just another categorie. theyre fun and in between mtb and motorcross. ppl just dont like theyre told its a replacement to mtbs because its not.

    • zipp23 says:

      I keep whining…I dont like the idea of crowded trails with all kind of non-cycling related activities.

  • markvw3 says:

    Went the Pivot site under specs and this thing is 9.999,00€ which is 11876.01 US dollars! Are you kidding me!? I guys I am keeping my Levo for a while …

  • bigcol says:

    It’s sad that Pivot and the MTB media have no interest in preserving the integrity of the sport. Motors have no place in MTB period.

  • Frayed Knot says:

    Can’t have a mountain bike video without dirt flying. Some times we are our own worst enemy. Screw those things

  • Ranman says:

    About time we get some decent builders in the market.

  • Eric says:

    More than 90% of natural bike trails doesn’t allow ebikes. I just can’t justify purchasing one. The problem is there’s no trail to ride it on.

  • kyle p says:

    Its good to see more mainstream competition in this market. As for those who disapprove, don’t be dismissive based on what you project will happen. Share the trail and see how it effects your day.

  • Brent says:

    Ebikes are motorcycle not pedal bikes and as such do not belong on mountain bike trails. Please keep this crap off of our mountains and let them stick to moto tracks.

  • hi_athlete says:

    stop fucking crying e bikes are here and guess what people are riding them like it or not it won’t affect anyones day or ride its all the same, pedal up shred back down but now we can do the pedal back up a lot quicker.people stop crying if you don’t wanna ride one don’t, just don’t fucking tell people what you think they should ride go ride your shit and shut the fuck up.piece out

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Terrene Cake Eater studdable fat bike tire launched


Terrene Tires has released its sixth tire model. The Cake Eater is a versatile, fast-rolling, studdable fat bike tire.

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