27.5+ / 29+ Reviews and News


Terrene Cake Eater studdable fat bike tire launched


Terrene Tires has released its sixth tire model. The Cake Eater is a versatile, fast-rolling, studdable fat bike tire.

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Rocky Mountain Instinct, Instinct BC, and Pipeline revised


Rocky Mountain’s new Instinct serves as the platform for three different bikes. Which version is up your alley?

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2018 Motobecane HAL eBoost PRO launched


Motobecane has introduced their first ever full suspension eBike, saying they believe more people riding bikes makes the world a better place.

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  • p brig says:

    A moped by any other name is still a moped.

  • peter says:

    Good to see a well built ebike at a competitive price. Please don’t call this a moped because it not. The rider has to actively be involved in pedaling it.

  • Alex says:

    http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/Vehicle/Mopeds.htm
    A motorized bike (moped) is a pedal bicycle with a helper motor, electric or gas-powered, and is exempt from inspection requirements. For a vehicle to qualify as a moped, it must meet all four of the following conditions:
    – Be classified as a pedal bicycle
    – Have a motor with less than 50 CCs
    – Cannot have more than 1.5 brake horsepower
    – Maximum speed cannot be greater than 25 MPH on a flat surface

    • swill says:

      This is how Mountain Biking ends. By calling electric motorcycles “bicycles” and riding them on MTB trails, you will get real bicycles banned from trails. Please keep the damage done by your laziness confined to your own fat butts.

    • Rob says:

      Hi Alex, Do you know if the max speed is with or without pedaling? I can already go over 25mph on a flat surface and I would think that if I had a motor “assist” I could cruise at over 25. Does that make it a motor vehicle since it would fail the max speed condition?

    • Bikesdirect says:

      The HAL eBoost is definitely a pedal bicycle. You pedal and the motor assists.
      This has a 250 Watt Motor like the Trek and Specialized ebikes but this is the only one in this price range that has the top level Shimano E8000 Mid Drive motor system.
      The 250 Watts is .335 horsepower so well below the 1.5 HP limit.

  • Randall says:

    I have rode and raced bikes for over 40 years. Haters are just little people that feel they have to prove something. The best thing that could happen to this world is billions of people buy and ride an Ebikes.

  • R. Wilson says:

    Mr. Swill, I understand your worry but keep in mind you don’t always stay in great shape your entire life. I’ve been mountain biking half of my life using my own power but once you get over 50 things begin to change with your body that you can do nothing about. Try as you may, you can’t stop the clock. I’m over 60 now. I’d love to ride in the mountains again but my cardio can’t take the stress of climbing the long hills. I’d love to have a nice e-mtb. Wish I had the money.

    • Jim says:

      I read a lot of hate posts by ebike advocates that are furious that regular non motorized riders don’t agree with them. Excuuuuuuuuuussssssse me for having an opinion you don’t agree with.

    • Jim says:

      I’ll be 70 next month, I’m still riding a regular self propelled mtb and have no intention of owning an ebike ever. Most of the ebike riders I have seen are dudes young enough to be my grandkid.

  • R. Wilson says:

    @ Jim, I still ride regular bikes as well but at your age you should know that other people your age have health issues that might make it hard to ride a regular bike. If you have great health at 70 and no joint, blood pressure, weight gain or muscle loss issues then consider yourself lucky. I’ve known people younger than me that are now dead and it scares the hell out of me.

  • GIO says:

    Except the other, do not judge, live and let live. some of the most used cliche that will stay as a cliche. we have improved our health, our life, communication, science, cars, housing, weapons but the human nature stay the same as when we were in the Garden of Eden or in the cave on the prehistoric man.
    I wonder what would become of us if women would rule?

  • El Geezer says:

    I’m 78 1/2, and I ride a Bullseye Monster fatbike on mountain bike trails and the beach, and I love it. I modified my drive train to get a 20/38 super-granny so I can get that heavy old thing up all those big, nasty hills. It works. I’m in great shape, I consider myself to be among the most fortunate old men out there, and I know it won’t last forever. Physical decline with age is absolutely inevitable – look at the research and the Masters Track and Field world records by age category.

    I’m considering getting a full-carbon Lamere fatty so I can lose about 15 pounds or so, but I know that sometime in the next ten years the struggle to get up those badass hills will start to outweigh the joy. Then what? I love being out in the boondocks in the sun and wind or whatever going up and down hills, hopping ruts. If a little bitty electric motor can help me stay out there until I’m 90, I’m going to get one, dear friends. End of story for me.

  • Karl says:

    I am 62,I have been riding a mountain bike for 32 years. I am struggling up climbs that I used to hardly notice. I ride with a gentleman who is 76 years old. He rides a Giant e-bike to keep up with his friends, young and old! Is he to be kicked to the curb because he can’t cut it under hid own power. He has paid his dues. There is an elitism at work here that will not stand. Access should be for everyone, poor trail etiquette will always be a problem!!

  • thomas cirillo says:

    im 69 been riding non stop for 65 of them years never got a car in college & recently some paper work from the motor dept. informed me that of the 53 years i could have had a car on the road i only had one regestered to me for 23 years! thats 30 years in the north east (long island new york) freezing my butt off ,so of course 4 years ago when these e bikes started showing up i grabed a couple. at first you will love them but after 4 years on easy street ive returned to my self powered self i just couldent take how out of shape & fat i was getting (im old so this is about life extension for me) you will go faster on them but die sooner,bottom line stay away from them their killers because we are all lazy if given that option .hey guess what wisdom comes with age noy just back & knee pain.love is all you need thommy

  • Steve A says:

    I enjoyed mountain biking for 20 years plus, but do to some health issues, I had to give it up… I can’t even say how excited I am to possibly be able to get back riding again. I can’t understand the negativity of so many mountain bikers – I guess I’m not seeing what the big downside is to having these on the trails. Interesting how technology creeps into everything.

  • Ryan says:

    I came here to read REVIEWS and gain some insight into the construction, durability, ride-ability, sales process, shipping and purchasing experiences of actual customers etc. of the Motobecane HAL eBoost 27Plus Full Suspension mountain bike.
    NOT to read all your “OPINIONS” about the legitimacy of eBikes vs. manual powered ones. GET OVER IT – the world changes. I also have been riding since I was 8 years old and have spent tens of thousands of dollars with Cannondale, Specialized, and Giant to name a few. Climbed thousands of miles on trails from California to Pennsylvania and everywhere in between. I have also reached the age where a little assistance on those long climbs is welcomed. Thanks for nothing. You trolls should accept the fact that your opinions will have opposition. Get over yourselves and pedal what you want and stop stepping on other peoples choices.
    Go for a ride and clear your head, keep your eyes on your own trail. Enjoy life.

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Heller Barghest plus bike review


Heller Bikes is aiming to offer a good value bike with a full carbon frame, 1×11 drivetrain, 130mm of rear travel, plus tires, and a dropper post. But how does it ride?

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Orbea Occam TR and AM updated


Whether you prefer little wheels and more travel or big wheels with less, Orbea’s new Occam is sure to please.

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Fox Float 34 fork with EVOL review


For model year 2018, Fox has updated the 34 chassis with a large volume negative air spring. Can something so minor really make a big difference?

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Niner SIR 9 trail bike launched


News out of the Niner camp today. The Colorado-based bike maker has re-released its original steel classic, the SIR 9, in a redesigned, ready for anything form.

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Fezzari offers new return policy, scales tall mountains


The Utah-based direct-to-consumer seller makes a huge range of bikes, including a great selection of mountain and road bikes. Find out more about what’s new and cool.

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Breadwinner Cycles Goodwater rolls out


Breadwinner Cycles was on hand at Sea Otter, showing off the new Goodwater, a bike the Portland-based custom builder calls its most versatile to date.

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  • N says:

    Those welds aren’t so great looking. Two thousand dollars for what looks like a regular steel diamond frame with a nice paint job? Are there really that many bicycle people with too much money and no idea what to do with it? Jones is selling his steel diamond frames, with a truss fork for just over $1k, and they look a hell of a lot better.

    • Ethan says:

      Be cool man. Fellow cyclist run this company. Your ignorant observations could compromise their livelihood. Also, the welder has been making custom bikes in the USA since before you were born. He may be no spring chicken but he knows what he’s doing and he’s damn good IMHO. Cheeers man or woman! Happy trails.

  • justin says:

    Didn’t Santa Cruz just release the new chameleon for less than half this price?

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2018 Ibis Ripley LS first ride review


The 3rd generation Ripley is here. It shares the same geometry as the beloved LS, but features a brand new rear triangle that can accommodate massive tires.

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  • Frank says:

    I’m pretty interested in this bike for endurance racing, but 27-28 pounds seems like a lot for a $6000+ bike. Is there an way to lighten this thing up? Maybe the carbon wheel set, 2.4 XC tires… anything else?

    • Steve says:

      If you are looking to do cross country style endurance racing, then get rid of the dropper post, go to a smaller tire size like a 2.25 in the rear and maybe even in the front, and Rocket Ron’s instead of Nobby NIc’s. These changes alone could drop 1.5 lbs. You can go carbon rims, but you can also save lots of money by just going with some American Classic Wide Lightnings (1565 grams for the set), that will actually stretch those new 2.25’s. Do this an it is quite possible to get this bike down to 25.5 lbs, give or take a few ounces.

      • Marc-Andre says:

        Steve is absolutely right. I have a Ripley V1 with Enve wheels DT180 hubs (I know I went crazy!), no dropper post, Thompson Elite seat post, Fizik Tundra saddle, Sram 1×11 XO, Shimano XT brakes, Rocket Ron in the front and Racing Ralph in the rear and I am at 24.5 pounds.

    • david says:

      I think if you get some carbon wheels (quarter pound) and a regular seatpost (three quarter pound) that’s about all you can do. If you do much else your really doing the bike a disservice, at that point you might as well get a different bike. I have been riding heavier and heavier stuff lately and I’m just getting faster. Don’t worry about weight too much. But I really do like getting carbon rims…

  • OK says:

    Can somebody explain how the front deraileur will work if it’s connected to the link that moves whan riding??

  • Philo says:

    From Ibis website:

    “The Shimano side swing front derailleur moves all the pivots and cable anchors forward away from the tire and the cable path off of the seat tube. This allowed us to rework the right upright to give more tire clearance. A swingarm mounted front derailleur is always in the right place in relation to the chain and chainrings so front shifting is more consistent throughout the travel.

    This mounting system also reduces chain slap since the chainstay can be located further from the chain. Also since the derailleur is moving with the chain there will be no chain rub at the extreme ends of the travel, particularly problematic with lower chainstay bikes and the smaller chainrings found on many 29ers.”

    It may help to look at photos which you can find by googling.

  • Bob says:

    “For an extra thousand dollars, you can have a complete SRAM NX or Shimano SLX build kit.” No, not that I can find, if you want Shimano then XT is the only build offered on their site.

    Looking through the other replies has given me the motivation to buy a frame and build it up myself.

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A new tire size is coming and it doesn’t suck


Plus sized erupted in popularity last year. The problem for many aggressive riders is that they didn’t hold up. Now a new tire size is coming that should split the difference between plus size and traditional tires.

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  • JCWages says:

    “Baby Fat” Awesome! Haha

  • Mark says:

    It seems to me a new mountain bike standard should be developed where bikes have internal width 30-35 mm rims, boosted hubs, and fit a broad range of tire widths from 2.4-3.0 inches. Just pick tire width depending on your conditions and personal preference. I’ve mounted everything from 1.8 to 2.4 inch wide tires on my “narrow” bikes which is a similar width range and it didn’t seem to affect the bike geometry much.

  • joseph says:

    Tire manufacturers need to stop worrying about the weight weeny crybabies and make tough durable plus tires…… if you don’t like the extra weight that comes from a aggresive trail ready plus tire……… then don’t buy one …….. stick to normal size bikes. Want a plus bike or fat bike? Deal with the weight. Now go ride.

  • jc says:

    Maxxis Rekon+ 2.8 on i35 rim is 2.63″ wide, so there you go.

  • Mark says:

    Mount a 3.0in wide tire on an i30mm (i = internal width) rim and you get a 2.8in wide tire. Mount a 2.8in wide tire on an i30mm rim and you get a 2.6in wide tire. Rule of thumb – 8mm of internal rim width change produces 0.1in of tire width change.

    • Pilot says:

      I’ve got a Specialized Camber 29er (base model) that came with 20mm wide rims. I’m not extremely pleased with the ride quality over its 2.3 wide tires. The front tire is always sliding sideways on me. It feels like there’s not enough surface area on the places I’ve been riding, especially when I’m pushing hard on climbs. So I’ve been contemplating switching to the 27.5 Plus but I don’t even know where to start and I’m not sure how much money I’d have to be spending on rims, tires, spokes, tires, plus labor for someone to do the job for me . I was really afraid of this (torn between 650b and the 29er) when I bought the bike a year ago (it was quite a bit over my budget to begin with) and now I just feel like selling the bike altogether and just buy cheaper 27.5 plus hardtail. Any ideas and opinions would be appreciated. Thank you!

  • PinkFloydLandis says:


    What’s with the rampant flats? First I’ve heard of it. I’ve put 2000 miles on my 3″ tires and have yet to flat. Same w/ my main riding partner. Article seems to give no explanation why a 2.6″ tire is fine, but on 2.8 you’ll “blow half your day patching flats.” Drop the hyperbole.

  • dddd says:

    Like the title of the article says, this “new” tire size doesn’t suck, in part because the tires are appropriately designed for current rim widths.
    And like jc says, this isn’t quite a new size, just a new designation that the tire makers will be working around with their sizing, design and marketing.
    I’ve been running the inexpensive and generously-sized Vigilante 2.3’s on my i35 rims, still gives 2.6″ width, and which works a lot better than on the i45 rims I was using.

  • Tom from RI says:

    Bought the 275 plus Stump jumper-carbon and love the bike- had nothing but problems with the Ground Control 3.0- thought the GRID was going to do the trick and the bead separated from the tire(running tubeless) have resorted to putting a tube in the rear- the front is the Purgatory and I had problems with sealant leaking through the side wall but has been fine for a while. This tire size is a work in progress- we will see how my warrantee request goes and the replacements- if not good it will be three strikes you are out…got my eye on the High Roller II and going to do some more research on tire width and relation to rim width- again knew that there were going to be some issues you cannot have such a big light tire and expect no issues. Absolutely love the bike and thinking I will end up with 2.8- I ride very aggressive technical love riding rocks- had 0 issues with the sidewall getting slashed which I have heard of- people are going to need to understand this rim width vs tire to get this the way they want it…also it is possible to just get a bad batch for those that farm out the job so that just wrecks any onesie twosie type of analysis -it could of been that one of the two of these just did not come out of the factory right- these forums are great- would love to be able to hook up my ole 26 inch trail bike with a lighter 2.5 or 2.8 if it exists-run High Roller 2.5 DH on my DH bike and 0 issues-tubeless also. These would be way to heavy for the trail.

  • dddd says:

    I should have said “…still gives [I]nearly[/I] 2.6″ width…”, and that the narrower rims did reduce sidewall-trauma issues with those tires ridden here in Auburn, CA.

  • bob says:

    how is that “new”? its 27.5+ tires…

  • meeseeks says:

    ridiculous maxxis icon+ recon+ “2.8” is no bigger than continental trail king 2,4 which coming in black chili and protection apex with same weight and twice cheaper.
    why no one asked companies who make real +size tires like WTB, Schwalbe, Duro.

    we need more sizes and also more rims for each size, don’t forget separately adventure, trail and enduro specifics tires

  • Highway Star says:

    I bought TEN 26″ tires this spring. 8x maxxis – 2.3″ to 2.5″ DHF, DHR2, Shorty, Aggressor, Minion SS. Also a pair of Schwable Nobby Nic.

    Won’t be buying any 27″ or plus tires any time soon.

  • narf narf says:

    love the 27.5 2.6″ Rocket Rons on Nox Teos. Perfec combo

  • Rodney says:

    My experience with Maxxis tires is that they are always more narrow than the tire size suggests. So is a Maxxis 2.6 really going to be a more like a normal 2.4?

  • Fo says:

    Darn and the Stan’s Flow Mk3 are 29mm inner width :-/

  • Rickets says:

    Try riding with rickets!

  • Highway Star says:

    This spring 2017 I’ve spent approximately $1000 on 26 Inch wheels and tires. A new Hadley/Flow Mk3 wheelset, and TEN 26″ tires. My bike is also all new within the last 2 years, 26″ frame and fork etc.

    I’m currently running a maxxis Shorty 26×2.5″ Front and 26×2.4″ DHR2 Rear on the Mk3’s. These are HUGE, soft rubber, GRIPPY tires, and at 875g-925g on a 460g rim, they are right on the far limit of is acceptable in weight on a trail bike. They are also not too big to feel floppy bouncy like a plus size. They roll over everything but can still be handled accurately.

    Anyone riding a 27.5″, I strongly recommend getting you hands on a 26″ wheelset with a roughly 30mm inner width, and trying a 750g-900g set of 2.4-2.5″ tires. Keep in the actual difference between 26″ and 650b (27.5″) is only an inch, and a half inch in radius. Compared to a 27.5″ with a 2.2″ tire, the 26×2.5 will be extremely close on ride height and rollover, a similar overall weight, sharper handling, stiffer, stronger, quicker, and will obviously be wider and more grippy.

  • Roger says:

    All the planned obsolescence has ruined mountain biking for me. You guys with big wallets can continue keeping up with the Jones’s. I’ll be buying used 26ers and parts.

    • Christian Ahlmann says:

      Roger, I just tuned up my 1999 Cannondale Super V with Lefty fork and 26″ wheels. Rides great. We’re on the same page ; )

  • gg says:

    Highway Star’s proposal looks interesting.
    MTBR make this happen within an El Comparo or shootout.

  • Stunnerbear says:

    I have a few bikes in the quiver and choosing the right one is just a matter of attitude. Of course choosing the right bike for the right ride does make a difference. For me time is my biggest enemy and the easier it is to set up and go, the easier it is for me to ride more. I choose carefully this year for my new bike and I got an S works Fuse and right away put 2.8 Rocket Rons in the lightest set up I could. Got the bike down to 24.5 lbs with pedals 2 cages and a multi tool. Once I got the tire pressure figured out 13.5 to 14 front and 16 to 17 rear I can now ride this bike faster than I could ever ride my 5″ full sus. trail bike of near same weight. It’s really more about your style and skill that makes what you choose right for you. I wanted a HT trail, light enduro shredder that I could send over doubles and go downhill fast. I guess what I am getting at is this tire option is way better than my 29er CX race bike and more fun than my 26er 5″ trail bike.

  • GuyOnMtb says:

    Didn’t the industry a year ago say the same thing about 30mm rims for 2.5 tires?

    The issue to “refine” fat tires into Plus tires, into Sub+ tires, to finally create the 2.6″ was a waste of energy and time. 2.5″ casings could have been refined and the tread patterns could be widened across the 2.5″ casing to create a tire with less weight then the “new 2.6 standard”.

    New standards before I can break my current standards; is merely a push to create more revenue and screw the consumer out on compatibility and longevity.

    Maybe next we can throw away the 31.8 handlebar and only have 35 bars, leaving about 3 tons of unused aluminum. Or, maybe we can make the BMX rear axle diameter a new standard on MTB?

    Know why this article didn’t have one pro-rider answering questions? Because they would have asked why we are no longer working on 30mm-35mm x 2.5″.

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Bontrager Line Pro 40 29+ carbon wheels review


The Line Pro 40 carbon wheelset is one of several new Line Pro components that have significantly upped the quality and design aesthetics game of the Bontrager brand. Is it worth the price of the upgrade over aluminum?

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Dream Build: Santa Cruz Hightower with all the trimmings


This Santa Cruz Hightower with dreamy component spec is admittedly a little over the top. But when you live and ride in a place like Crested Butte, your bike should be worth more than your car.

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  • Botacco says:

    Cool, but why an XT groupset on such an “dream build”?
    I could understand brakes but not the crankset.

    On this bike we need an Hollowgram, a Next SL or something below 400 grams including spider, chainring and bottom bracket!

    • Kent Robertson says:

      Agreed. As long as you’re at $9500 already why not go all in with a Next SL crank and full Eagle drivetrain?

    • Maciej Pike-Biegunski says:

      Those cranks all break when used for heavy trail or bike park use. An XTR trail crankset is 100g lighter than an XT or SLX, but I wouldn’t run anything else.

  • loll says:

    okay, did you paid full retail?

  • Alex says:

    Some curious choices for someone counting grams.

    I’m still working out how you justified $3000 on wheels and tires, but couldn’t spring for an XD freehub and a decent cassette. The X01 10-42 is $250 and 200g lighter. Same comment about the cranks. Not bad for the price, but 200g heavier than the $400ish options you might have picked for this build.

    Some of the difference could have come from the silly-expensive stem. There’s a reason almost every stem is alloy: carbon doesn’t make sense for parts that require uniform strength in all directions.

    Otherwise, it’s very nice. Looks like a lot of fun.

  • TommyT says:

    Yeah, what Alex said…and IBIS 942s would have saved about $1k over the ‘look-at-mENVE’ wheels. Carbon $tems are for…well, apparently this builder.

  • BlackBean says:

    This is just a build to push product people. And by any measure, it has a pretty fantastic spec. And anybody would change something on this bike. But that’s not the point. It’s just pushing product.

  • DMP says:

    Cool that you can fit a 200mm dropper! I couldn’t find any info on maximum seatpost insertion for the Hightower, but it looks like a straight seat tube with no pivots in the way. Can it fit the whole 300mm lower tube of the 200mm stroke Fall Line?

  • ramon says:

    not what i would call a dream
    build
    dream builds always almost have CK stuff
    xtr and the likes

  • dudee47 says:

    If you’re gonna go with an XT, why not use the Box Two 11-46 or Sunrace 11-46 11-Speed cassette? They have the same range as the XT cassette, but they offer a better spread of gears, instead of the massive jumps the Shimano one has.

  • meeseeks says:

    dream build?? and where is ONYX, Öhlins, sram eagle, race face next sl cranks, proper brakes.
    I see only pile of outdated shitmano scrap.

  • Raceroni says:

    You could have bought a new 750 to 1000 cc street motorcycle for that much money.

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X-Fusion McQueen Plus fork review


The new McQueen fork from X-Fusion retails for roughly 20% less than it’s competitors. So how does it compare?

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Video: Trek Powerfly 8 FS review


The Powerfly 8 is Trek’s 130mm travel full suspension e-bike. Based off the Fuel EX-platform, this bike is fully compliant with e-bike regulations and performs well on the trail.

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2018 Santa Cruz Chameleon 27.5+ spy photos


This new Chameleon from Santa Cruz has been spotted in several Santa Cruz dealers. It not only looks promising but the the rumored pricing is attractive as well.

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  • guy smiley says:

    Nice looking. Been interested to see how SC enters the + hardtail market….should’ve guessed it!

  • Randy Cougars says:

    The smaller the headtube the better it looks and the more versatile it is.

  • BlackBean says:

    I found that you can’t really run too low pressure on HT plus bikes. They are more prone to rim strikes so I always have to run my rear tire at a pretty high pressure (relatively). I have to pump it hard enough that the tire feels much harder than I would pump a XC tire. And that negates most of the comfort factor. All other things considered though, plus hardtails with trail geometry are fantastic beasts!

  • Dave says:

    I have a Specialized Fuse comp (2017). Best hardtail I ever had. Love the 3″ tires. Stable, solid. The 27.5+ thing seems to be the way to go for HT’s for sure. Note: I do not race.

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Salsa Deadwood 29+ adventure bike launched


The new Salsa Deadwood harnesses 29+ wheels and an efficient short travel carbon frame to create the ultimate bike packing and endurance racing machine.

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  • yakkoTDI says:

    And it has the same problem as the previous (and more awesome in my opinion) Deadwood and that is standover height is too high. I would have loved to purchased the drop bar version but alas it was not to be.

  • Need_Some_More_Salsa says:

    Ok, I just demo’d this bike this morning. These are my impressions…

    1. This is a SERIOUSLY heavy and big bike !
    2. My right calf kept hitting the upper seat stays on the right side.The swingarm is aluminum and the front triangle is carbon.
    3. The 3.0 tires stick like velcro in turns.
    4. The demo bike came w/a 150mm rockshox dropper and I couldn’t get the seatpost down low enough so I had to just drop the seat using the dropper and leave it there for the ride. For reference I’m 6’1′.
    5. Uphill this bike is a P.I.G. – Downhill this bike is a MONSTER !!! It rolls over anything downhill with the 3.0 sized tires.

    Honestly, I think the Deadwood is a work-in-progress. I rode the Pony Rustler also with 3.0 tires and that bike is a much lighter, great handling and well-balanced bike.
    On both bikes I thought that the suspension performed well.

  • TOM HORN says:

    This bike is the best money i ever spent love it climbs well!
    its like a road bike in woods

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Rocky Mountain Pipeline plus bike review


Think plus bikes are just for beginners? The Rocky Mountain Pipeline might change your mind. Check out the Mtbr review.

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  • Bob says:

    “There’s this perception, perpetuated by cycling media, that plus bikes are best suited for beginners” (FTFY)

    I keep reading statements like this on the web and in magazines. Standard 2.8 “plus” tires (like the Rekons in this review) typically measure out to 2.66″ wide and are apparently for beginners only. Yet the industry is falling all over themselves with excitement about new wide track tires that measure 2.6″ and totally shread the trails. Um, okay.

  • BlackBean says:

    Right on Bob!

    I’ve ridden some terrible plus bikes. I definitely find I don’t like the 3 inch tires on 27.5 rims. 2.8 definitely works much better for me. That being said, I own a Trek Stache 9 with 29 inch rims and 3.0 tires and I LOVE them. Maybe it’s just the tire weight and compound.

    I think plus bikes is ideally suited for most of the terrain the East Coast. I’m far from the best or fittest rider out there, but I’m sufficiently capable to ride anything on offer on a HT 29er. And have been for years. But. I got a Trek Stache and HOLY COW. You just feel safer and can go harder. And then for the first time in over a decade a actually tired a plus-sized FS bike with trail geometry/travel. Did I say HOLY COW! Just so much faster and feeling more confident, especially when it’s much wetter. I’m closing in on 50 and I’m past the point where I need to feel like a hero. I will always ride my 29er HT in the more mellow parks and rail trails, but when it gets rockier and it’s wet, the plus bike is the go-to tool.

  • Dale says:

    I read a another review on this bike and they said it was the Rocky Mountain Sherpa with more travel and cost…

  • Ralph says:

    Dale – then that was not a very good review…

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Maxxis Minion and HighRoller Plus tires weights and measurements


Plus Tires is a growing category eagerly awaiting the arrival of more tires with better side knobs and sidewalls. How big are they and how much do they weigh?

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  • mike says:

    Hi,

    I have a 2017 Pike boost 27,5 (non plus). I love my minion 2.5 wt and want to try a Maxxis Minion 2.8. Would it fit or to less free space for mud?
    Thanks!
    Mike

    • Will says:

      Mike, I don’t know about the Minion but I am running a Maxxis Rekon 2.8 up front on a boost 27 Pike. There’s probably .25-.5″ between the tire and the fork. This is on 35mm rims. If you have narrower rims the tire should theoretically be taller.

  • Mark Sevenoff says:

    Been really happy with the Purgatory GRID 3.0’s, but am interested in trying some of those High Roller 3.0’s when they become available.

    • Larry says:

      I’ve been very happy with my Purgatory Grid 3.0s as well – but would like to hear about your experience with Maxxis 3.0s. I’m running 30mm carbon wheels

  • Scott says:

    What was the ID of the rim you were measuring the 2.8 Minion on?

  • Tom says:

    Just ordered the ground control 3.0 grid to replace the GC non grid…been having issue with tubeless and am using a turbe for the first time in 15 years..we will see how this puppy works out tubeless -love Maxxis and surprised by the weights and a HR fan for many years so will most likely end up there both front and rear- I see all upside with the tire being higher and wider and less weight

  • Sean says:

    What size ID did you measure the 2.3 DHF’s on?

  • derby says:

    Yes, as other’s mentioned already, inner rim width is required for ‘apples-to-apples’ tire width measurement. Because: a tire’s sidewall profile width varies about 1/3 x (rim-width difference) for road tire sizes, to 1/2 x (rim-width difference) for mountain tire sizes.

    Additional notes: Unless a tread wraps far down the sidewalls, such as some plus-sized and fat tires, a given tire’s tread width has minimal, nearly measurable width change for rim-width differences, and is an inverse in width difference to rim-with difference. Also, a given tire’s diameter difference have nearly un-measurable diameter difference to rim width difference, unless more than about 1 inch in rim width change.

    Maybe optical perspective in the photos, but it appears the casing widths were measured, rather than the wider tread knobs. For practical stay and fork leg clearance considerations of tire measurements, tire widths should be measured by the widest cross section of the tire profile, whether tread or sidewall, whichever is wider, to accurately calculate clearance differences to stays and fork legs.

    Stop by and say “Hi!” at the Derby Rims booth at the following bike expos this spring: Sedona, NAHBS, Hurricane, Outerbike, and Sea Otter Classic. More events later are TBD.

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Guerrilla Gravity unveils new Megatrail and Megatrail SS


Guerrilla Gravity has launched a new version of the Megatrail that’s billed as a “big mountain liberator.” The versatile bike is designed to conquer everything from getting after it at your local enduro race, shredding bike park laps, or just slaying your after-work rides.

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Is the new WTB Ranger 29+ the ultimate bike packing tire?


While plus tires are popular in the mountain bike arena for their ability to level terrain, they’ve also helped open up a new whole world to bikepackers.

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  • yakkoTDI says:

    1140 grams is now considered stupid heavy for such a large tyre? My WTB Graffiti SF Team DH tyre in 26×2.2 is 1497 grams.

  • alias says:

    err…..”The only problem with getting that far out there? You’re screwed if you flat”

    I learned how to fix a flat on my bike about 35 years ago, and I suspect I am not the only one with this ‘skill’.

    Something, something, low hanging fruit, bla bla…..

  • bong says:

    I put one of these on my rear tire about 200 miles into the AZT after my Chupacabra ripped at the bead. The grip was good and it was tough but the tread was gone by the end of the trip, around 500 miles on the tire.

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Mtbr’s top 10 most read articles in 2016


What are Mtbr readers most interested in? If we use the top 10 most read articles of 2016 as a barometer, it’s reviews, reviews, and more reviews. Plus a smattering of interviews and product roundups.

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Mtbr Best of 2016 Awards: Plus Bike


What makes the Santa Cruz Hightower great? For starters, it’s not just a plus bike; it’s a trail ripping, do-it-all singletrack slayer that can be set up with 27.5+ wheels and a 150mm fork or 29er hoops and 140mm of front end squish. Click through to find out more.

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  • Scott says:

    Dave, do you know what plus size wheelset he was using? I’m trying to get the same for my Hightower and am wondering if there is a reliable and budget friendly setup that others are happy with.

  • Perfectbike says:

    First of all I couldn’t imagine pedaling that SC up hill. Well, I could. It would always be a lockout-mania event with all that squish. And that BB will definitely have pedal strikes with 25% sag and low pressure plus tires. I bet it’s fun downhill but otherwise, no thanks. It nearly crazy you included the Specialized giving the enormous quantity of complaints about the rear suspension on that bike and so many owners modifying the rear shock. If you don’t, it just wallows down and strikes rocks all day long…lockout be damned. Not mentioning the 2017 Genius Plus or the 2017 Spark Plus (likely the actual “Bike of the Year”) is total rubbish.

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Video: Torture testing a $1000 hardtail


Can an $1000 hardtail survive bike park abuse under a professional rider? The results may surprise you.

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Specialized Fuse Expert Carbon 6Fattie review


Hardtails aren’t dead. Not by a long shot. Specialized’s new Fuse Expert Carbon 6Fattie proves that thanks to its fun geometry, excellent parts spec, and agreeable price point.

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  • John says:

    $3500? Let’s see my SC 5010 was $2800 on sale. I think I’ll keep my full suspension bike. If this bike was $2000, maybe?

  • Robert Park says:

    Love my Aluminum Fuse. It’s a mountain bike for us old fart road bike guys. Super stable on the roughest terrain. But not as slow as a fat bike. And it was $1300. I keep the carbon go fast on the road side of the hobby.

  • Steve says:

    For carbon and $3500 this thing should weigh 25 pounds…. I built up a NS Bikes Eccentric Djambo frame (Plus-compatible, cheap, aluminum, 420mm chainstays, NOT BOOST-142mm rear spacing) with a mix of used and new parts for $1200 with weight in mind with a NON BOOST and non-plus 2015 Fox Float 32 140mm because standard Fox forks have plenty of arch and crown clearance and 140mm travel versions have the same A-C as 120mm Plus forks that the frame was designed around. It came out to 26.2 pounds without pedals.

    • Jason says:

      yea, but your still left with an Eccentric Djambo with a bunch of mis-matched used parts…congratulations. Change the wheels and tires on the Fuse and your well below 26.2 lbs.

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