Road Bike Reviews and News


Niner MCR 9 RDO gravel bike sneak peek


Dubbed the MCR 9 RDO (as in magic carpet ride), the new Niner gravel grinder is a versatile steed that’s happy on pavement, dirt, and everything in between.

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DT Swiss Interbike 2017


With three main MTB wheel families (XC, all-mountain, enduro) and multiple price points within each family, DT Swiss has all your riding bases covered.

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  • Larsv says:

    The guy looks a bit confused.. So many names/numbers and wheelsets!

    I wonder why DT still uses the 1200/1501/1700 numbers. Wouldn’t it just be easier to ditch those numers and rename them to their classic hubs number? 180/240/350. They would save money on decall plastic too. 🙂

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REI retires Novara brand, launches Co-op Cycles


REI may not be the first place you shop for a bike, but their new brand offers a lot of value for the average consumer looking to break into the sport.

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  • Anonamoose says:

    With all due respect to REI members, a rebranding isn’t what’s needed to solve the relentless slide towards being a fashion-first T-shirt shop. Once REI rivaled any store for the best value in serious outdoor equipment. Now >80% of the store is aimed squarely at car camping and backyard entertaining. Once you pass all the cotton shirts and overpriced folding furniture, back in the bike section you will find low-end CoOp bikes and a few Ghost mid-range bikes — but nobody who knows how to fit a bike properly or set up a suspension correctly.

    Sorry REI, we used to love shopping at your stores. But then you became just another retailer distributing what Columbia and an handful of other mega-manufacturers push at the masses. The range of products you carry only goes from chinese junk to taiwanese middle-of-the-road. Want a made-in-the-USA canoe or kayak? Not a chance. A bike with top-end SRAM or Campagnolo components? Forget about it.

    Rebranding bikes simply doesn’t make your store special. To do that, you need to get back to your roots, which served everything including the highest quality stuff — all at the best prices in town.

    • Payless says:

      Amen to that brother, I’ve been saying this for years now. 2 seasons ago I was planning a backpacking trip through the Whites and went to my local REI to pick up an updated map and trail guide and they had notta. Im in NJ, how do you have an outdoor store that doesn’t have maps to the most visited park on the East Coast.

    • Luke says:

      Maybe it’s our area or I just didn’t notice, but at our REI I never noticed a bunch of overpriced cottonwear or folding chairs… Sure it’s a place you can buy $4 plain cliff bar or generally overpriced stuff but I’m really considering buying bike from REI because they were the only place near in town that had a bike shop you can buy obscure parts like the axle cones for repairing your bike, at a decent price.

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2015 Holiday Gift Guide: Gadgets for your cycling geek


Cyclists are inherently gadget geeks, fully capable of boring friends while arguing the finer points of minor bicycle componentry. To help them explore new topics of gadget geek conversation, here are 10 great gifts.

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NAHBS 2015: And the winners of this year’s show are…


Each year, the North American Handmade Bicycle Show brings together a unique and talented assortment of frame builders and bike enthusiasts. Some builders went above and beyond the rest and were recognized at the awards ceremony for their creativity, vision, and craftsmanship. Here is a run-down of some of this year’s winners.

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Video: Bamboobee BIY Bike Kit


Video: According to Bamboobee, you don’t need engineering expertise or sophisticated machinery to build your own bicycle frame–just some simple tools and their kit.

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  • Derek Cochrane says:

    This is sweet I would like 2 know more???

  • Ed K says:

    I’m sure it is a great product, but not my cup of tea. Not so sure I want to pay for the privilege of building my own bike from a kit.

  • bobi says:

    I wonder how well the baamboo copes with chain suck?

  • Dave says:

    The professor made that on Gilligan’s Island.

  • donaldo feen says:

    Winner of the internet:
    “The professor made that on Gilligan’s Island.”

  • Alwood says:

    Are you kidding me; the only road bike is $3400 ; for the “opportunity” to put it together myself. For that price I could order three carbon fiber or four aluminum bikes from a well known, reliable mail order company. And they build most of their bikes in the USA, and employ Americans. Yea I know, I’m old fashion and just don’t understand the GRAND SCHEME of things.

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Handmade Show: Ritchey carbonates Break-Away travel bike


Ritchey has been building their luggage-checkable Break-Away travel bikes in steel and titanium for years. This year company adds a three-pound carbon frame option.

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  • Steve says:

    So wouldn’t that still be a major pain to deal with? I don’t see how you’re going to get around dealing with brake/shifter cables every time you transport it. Besides fitting in a smaller box I’m not sure how this helps. Unless I’m totally missing something.

    • Max says:

      Steve,
      The Ritchey breakaway comes with ‘cable splitters’ that allow you to quickly disconnect the brake and shift cables. Packing my breakaway takes 20 minutes and unpacking takes 15 minutes. I don’t know that I’d feel great about a carbon travel bike. I’ve seen what baggage handlers do to my breakaway and I’m glad that it’s made out of steel. I do wish that they’d offer the steel breakaway with this paint scheme though!

      Max

    • Thomas says:

      I have had the Ti Break Away for … oh…going on five years now. I have traveled with it so much that I am on my second Ritchey travel case!

      It goes together in less than 20 minutes…and comes apart even faster. The cables are not even an issue with the way they are designed to come apart in the middle of the cable with male/female threads.

      The carbon looks beautiful but one reason I went with the Ti is for it’s ability to withstand abuse from the airlines. I would be a little concerned with sidewall dings from baggage handling.

    • Neez says:

      The point is you’re traveling for a trip to a vacation destination or competition. It’s assumed you would take your bike with you, and a few small hand tools. Only takes an hour tops to get your bike back together, tuned and ready to ride for your competition or long stay at your vacation destination.

      I guess if this is something you wand to keep in the trunk of your car for a quick ride, that might be a different story.

  • Cracker says:

    $3,200 for a frame! That’s like 3 very cool complete bikes. Parts of the industry has gone nuts with pricing. The only reason we would pay these prices is if we see bikes as jewelry. Its great to be an enthusiast, biking is a thoroughly captivating and interesting sport. However, the manufacturers are tapping into realms of exclusivity and vanity that have no direct link to turning cranks. Has anyone noticed that in so far as road bikes are concerned that so called innovation isn’t making anyone faster, its mostly hype, fluff and pretty decals resulting in soulless objects with very nearly zero added utility.

  • Bobby says:

    Travel bikes utilize cable splitters that enable a bike like this to be out of the box and rolling in 20 minutes or less. At worst the rear derailleur cable could require a turn of the barrel adjuster.

  • gln says:

    Steve, I think they use special cable-connectors, so you can just unhook them in the middle.

  • JB says:

    Steve, the brake/shifter cables have couplers that allows them to “break” in the middle and then re-attach.

  • J Bennett says:

    Being able to break the bike in half and putting it into a smaller box means a person can eliminate the charge that airlines exact upon travelers who want to take their bike with them. The charge depending on the airline can range from $100 one way to $300 round trip for a full sized bike box. In reference to cables, there are connectors that can go on the shifter brake cables to “break” them apart as well.

  • Tom says:

    Well, electronic wireless gearing will solve part of that problem. One day the same system will be adopted in brakes once the public become used to the reliability of the system. Give it time…it’s already in development ;- )

  • PinkFloydLandis says:

    I’ve travelled extensively w/ an S&S coupled bike for nearly 10 years and have learned their pros & cons.
    Break down bikes have limited benefit for domestic travel, because cheap domestic shipping options for “full size” bike cases negate most of the benefits. I can ship a 65+ pound bike box loaded to the gills 1500 miles to my destination for $60 via FedEx Ground. Its waiting for me at my hotel or friend’s house, and I don’t need to drag it through airports, mass transit, etc. Why bother with the cost and additional packing hassle of a break down bike and small case, especially when many airlines will charge you $25-50 for ANY bag.
    International travel is where break down bikes are invaluable. Bike transport is at least $200 each way international; if your trip has many legs, it adds up fast. On a recent trip to Peru, I avoided $600 of surcharges by using a break down bike that fits in 26x26x10 case. It was also FAR easier toting around mass transit and cabs in foreign cities.
    Whatever the destination, I’m not a big fan of the Ritchey design. The seatpost junction design is very elegant and strong, but the downtube clamp is fairly crude. Not something I’d trust to endure longterm hard use.
    A (relatively) cheap alternative is to pick the steel frame of your choice (Soma, Surly, etc), and have S&S couplers installed. Final price is competitive with the steel Breakaway, and the result is far stronger. And you can pick among far more frame designs.
    Also, many full suspension bikes can be packed into the same cases that a Breakaway uses if you pull the rear swingarm. I’ve done this w/ Intense and Turner bikes many times. A good option for international MTB travel.

  • mac says:

    Carbon is not a good idea considering how these cases need to be packed.

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2013 Salsa Cycles – El Mariachi limited ed, Colossal and Beargrease


QBP is the largest bicycle parts distributor in the US. Every year, they hold their SaddleDrive event to give bike shops a first look at the bikes, parts and gear that they stock with a focus on the brands that QBP owns like Salsa Cycles and Surly. Shown here are a few photos of 3 […]

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  • martini says:

    The more I see of Salsa, the sadder I am that I don’t have the market to sell them. Great looking stuff. Again.

  • NEPMTBA says:

    Thanks, a great look at things to come! I just have to rob a bank now, just kidding, I will get a paper route as Dad suggested… LOL

  • dave says:

    No rack or fender mounts on the Colossal? WTF?

    The main justification for discs on road is better performance in the wet and carrying a load. If we can’t do that on this bike, what’s the point?

    Please tell me this isn’t the final product!

  • jmphisure@gmail.com says:

    I road this last night at the Carver Lake Salsa Demo. Yes the TI Mukluk was bombproof but for the dollar value this bike was my favorite of the evening. It handled like gem. Factory gearing etc. was just fine. Handle bars and seat of course are personal but if you can find one and are in the market for a S/S, I can’t say enough about it.

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