Tires Reviews and News


Bontrager Team Issue XR1 TLR tires review


Forward thinking tread design gives Bontrager’s XR1 wider sweet spot than just cross country racing.

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  • Tom says:

    Agree. Surprising tire. These came on my Procaliber, and I almost didn’t ride them (usual combo is XR2/XR3).

    I’m glad I did. They are faster than the XR2s, but seem to have just as much grip. Stuck with the XR3 up front, though.

  • Teleken says:

    Looks like a Specialized Fast-Trak with smaller shoulder knobs.

  • Flynbryan19 says:

    Sadly I did not have the same positive experience. Perhaps since they were original equipment on my bike (17′ Trek Top Fuel) they are a harder rubber compound… The tire is “reasonably light” and it is a very fast rolling tire. The down side for me though was traction in loose over hard (which an XC tire should be designed for) was very poor. Even with pressures as low as 20/23 front/rear respectively they have very poor traction on the climbs. They would also wash out suddenly and never catch in corners w/ the same conditions. I will say traction in damp dirt was great though. Again why I think it maybe a rubber compound issue?

    Went to a Schwalbe Rocket Ron / Racing Ralph combo and traction is MUCH improved. Also dropped rotational weight. Win/Win. They’re not a “bad” OE tire, but I would not recommend buying them to replace existing tires. There are much better options.

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Kenda opens bicycle tire test track at Ohio R&D facility


Kenda’s new testing facility in Ohio took inspiration from the Sea Otter Classic XC course, and allows for a controlled environment and consistent, repeatable tire testing.

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Vittoria 2018 tires sneak peek


Vittoria continues to invest in the their mountain bike offerings. Here’s some highlights from the growing brand.

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  • jc says:

    What’s the weights of these fancy treads? Thinking Martello front / Morsa rear might be pretty darn great. Better than my HRII front / Rekon+ rear combo though?

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Hot new wheels, tires, and hubs from Interbike 2017


Check out the latest wheels, hubs, tires, and more from Industry Nine, Maxxis, Onyx, MRP, and Wolf Tooth.

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VEE Tire Crown Gem Junior launched


VEE Tire Co. has announced the release of the Crown Gem Junior, a new tire for the junior category created specifically for children’s riding safety.

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Maxxis Interbike 2017


The highly-regarded tire maker continues to expand its popular Wide Trail lineup with new versions of the Rekon, Forekaster, Ardent Race, Aggressor, High Roller II, and more.

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Maxxis adds host of new MTB tire sizes


Maxxis has once again upped its number of available tires/sizes, with plus tires getting ‘normal’ size options, narrow cross country rubber getting wider, and more.

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  • Highway Star says:

    “Maxxis has expanded the Minion DHF’s Wide Trail offerings to include 26×2.5WT”

    YES 26″ = YES SALE.

  • Highway Star says:

    The 26×2.5WT DHF should be pretty huge and as big as any practical rider needs. I’ve got a 26×2.5WT Shorty that is massive and a 26×2.4WT DHR2 that is nearly as big. I’ve been waiting for the 26×2.8 DHF/R2 to become available at retailers, but I doubt I’ll pick one up.

    The 2.5WT DHF 3C and 2.4WT DHR2 DC should be a great combo for all around rough riding.

  • Jason Smith says:

    I have 27.5 x 2.6 DHF and 27.5 x 2.6 Rekon on my Santa Cruz 5010. That combo works really well for my riding style on Pisgah and Dupont state forest trails in NC. Great traction, lower pressures, more confidence on rocky and rooty descents. When I put them on last month, it felt like it added a little bit of travel to my suspension.

  • jc says:

    Forekaster = IRC Mythos on roids

  • Willis says:

    Rekon in a 29 x 2.6? Did not see it on the site, but will anxiously wait!

  • LW says:

    Maxxis Minion 26 x 4.8s just shredded 36 miles of Bend singletrack and lava rocks over the 2 rides this past weekend. I was impressed they held up on the sharp rocks and the float/traction on the loose dusty sections was unreal. Fat Bikes all year long. Keep up the great tires.
    -LW

  • Dickachu says:

    maxxis 2,6 I beat its still going be smaller than continental 2.4

  • Brian McInnis says:

    THANKS MAXXIS!

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Terrene Cake Eater studdable fat bike tire launched


Terrene Tires has released its sixth tire model. The Cake Eater is a versatile, fast-rolling, studdable fat bike tire.

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Top 5 tubeless tire set-up mistakes


Tubeless tires are one of the greatest revolutions in mountain biking, but few bikes on the showroom floor are shipped ready to ride. Here’s how to (and not to) convert to tubeless.

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  • tyrebyter says:

    Good stuff. Soapy water is the most used tire lube, but not the right one. A proper tire lube e.g. RuGlyde, is the correct lube. Ask your professional mechanic. If he says soapy water, get a new professional mechanic.

  • Shred says:

    I’ve been tubless now for about 10years give or take, and I’ve never had to clean my valve stem nor have I ever had a clogged valve stem. I guess I’m lucky. I also don’t add or change the sealant for maintainence. I only add sealant if the tire starts to consistently loose air. More recently, I’ve found that I can even get away without running any sealant! Which saves me at least 4 ounces of rotating weight. With my current setup, I have LB 26+ 46mm, (40i) carbon rims, 12mm Stans tape, (only covers the spoke holes in the channel and won’t get messed up when mounting or dismounting tires) 1 wrap nice and tight. American Classic valve stem and 26×2.8 Maxxis DHRII 120tpi 3c EXO tires mounted dry with my compressor. They have held air and been ridden through everything for about 3 months now with no issues, until last week. I got a puncture in the rear. No problem, I just pull out my Stans valve core removal tool and squirt in 2oz of Stans that I keep in my pack, (Stans 2oz bottle, no syringe needed) reinstall valve core pump up and ride. Still no sealant in the front. Also, prior to mounting the 12mm rim tape, I throughly clean the inner rim surface with rubbing alcohol and a clean cloth. I also set the rims and tape out in the sun so they can warm up.The adhesive on the tape sticks better and the tape is more playable this way and will slightly stretch when pulled tight around the rim. This setup has been flawless for me thus far.

  • myke2241@earthlink.net says:

    i think a proper floor pump is critical. my air gauge is wack and caused me to add too much air blowing off the tire more than once. i only figured out what was going on after using a different pump.

  • gliderboy says:

    Newbie here who just went through process and has the problems freshly in mind. Many like me may have a more entry level bike without tubeless ready tires. No worries, this is not a problem if handled properly. In my case I used a non TR Maxxis Pace that was a disaster on my first time effort. Success with this non TR tire required removing the radial mold seams on the tire bead with some toe nail clippers. Secondly, my tubeless Presta valve interfered with the tire seating properly about it on my narrow 19mm inner width rim. To overcome this simply loosen and press the valve stem beyond the bead. Visually observe the bead and sidewall coming into place at the valve stem area then tightnen the stem down. Additionally, check the stem periodically during process to make sure is stays tight. The last critical bit was to spray a soapy solution at the bead and rubbing in onto the rim bead with a finger. Once you get a bead seat do the tire shake seen on many videos to distribute your sealant. These steps enabled me to make my first successful ghetto tubeless with even a super weak pathetic $5 floor pump. I have ridden it hard at only 22psi and checked it twice under water finding no leaks

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Can you run Maxxis Wide Trail tires on regular rims?


Are you shopping for new Maxxis tires, but not sure whether you need Wide Trail or regular width version? This interview will help clear things up.

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  • HEMIjer says:

    We need a 29×2.8 with Mid ramped fast rolling center knobs, mid transition knobs, and larger side knobs!

  • ColinL says:

    Great article and great pictures. The last picture of a standard tire on a wide rim is especially instructive. If only we could’ve had that on MTBR about 2 years ago when wide rims started their re-emergence. 🙂

  • Steve says:

    I own a Yeti SB5c with Derby rims. I put a Wide Trail DHF 2.5 on the front and absolutely love the benefits I get. However, there is no discussion here that recommends what “Wide Trail” tire to put on the rear. I was informed by Yeti customer service that the widest tire I can put on my rear rim is a 2.4. Why are there no 2.4 or other size rear WT tire offerings? Why would Maxxis spend so much time and money to produce only Wide Trail tires for the front and not the back??? Why doesn’t Maxxis recommend “Rear Specific Wide Trail Tires” on their website? In my opinion, Maxxis had made a critical error in not developing/recommending a category of rear specific Wide Trail tires. They are losing money from riders such as myself who would fall all over themselves trying to buy a rear specific Wide Trail tire.

    Can someone more knowledgeable about this subject than myself please inform me what rear tire I should buy to go with my wide Derby rim???

    • Shred says:

      Steve, Maxxis does make a rear specific WT tire in 27.5 X 2.4. It’s the DHRII, listed in the graphic above. The R in DHR is for rear, although it can still be used as a front and some people, myself included like it better than a DHF in the front. I run a DHRII front and rear and it’s great. Mine are 26 X 2.8 though.

  • Steve says:

    Shred, thanks for the update! However, I’m looking for a faster rolling tire like the Rekon in a 2.4 size. Too bad they don’t make it in that size. I’ll have to look around because nobody has yet given me an answer as to what fast rolling rear tire to put on my bike. I really want a tire that’s close to 2.4 and looks and acts like a Rekon.

    • Stu says:

      Could give a 2.35 Ikon a go. It’s very rounded profile and low even knob height means it will work well with the wider rim.

      Personally though I’d just go minion (whichever flaovour) front and rear and revel in the traction.

  • Mark says:

    It looks like the new trailbike sweet spot is going to be rims in the i30-35mm range with tires in the 2.4-2.8in range. In contrast, recent Narrowbikes have rims in the i20-25mm range and support tires in the 2.0-2.4in range. I currently own a Plusbike and I like the wider low-pressure tires. However, I think the early Plusbikes with i45mm rims and 3.0in tires is too much weight and to too much rolling resistance to make for a truly great trailbike. I’m psyched to see these new tires.

  • Mark says:

    Maybe bike tires should should now be labeled with the recommended rim width. Such as 29 x 2.6in per i35mm or 27 x 2.3in per i25mm or 26 x 4.0in per i75mm or 26 x 4.8in per i95mm. What do you think???

  • Bob says:

    It’s hilarious to read a Maxxis rep going into detail on rim width down to the millimeter when they can’t come within .25″ of their specified tire width. Meet the new 2.5″ “standard” same as the old 2.25.

  • Scott says:

    So, is 2.6 a “WT” size from Maxxis? They’re listed in that chart but they don’t have “WT” in the name. Point being, what size rims are those tires designed for?

  • gg says:

    Arrghh those tire graphics are horrible and lots of confusion as seen from the comments.
    Seriously the industry needs to stop all this snake oil salesmanship.
    Wallet is healthy, but closed for now !

  • JoelBS says:

    So we are moving back to wider rims, like the ones we had in the 90s and we thought they were not cool enough and needed slim rims. MTB has been too influenced by road biking. The same happened with snowboard and ski in the early years until the have 90-95% become a separate discipline.

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Kenda Hellkat and Helldiver DH tires review


Kenda attacked cornering speed, braking power, rolling resistance, and tested it on the DH circuit. But they did not forget casing technology, or pursuing strength and suppleness.

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  • SteveO says:

    Did you miss the part where these are DOWNHILL tires?

    • MikeG says:

      Clearly you missed, or haven’t made it to the lesson in which nasty terrain and race courses turn standard trail tires into leaking, piles of rubber that even the most liberal pre-race Stans and 30+ PSI setup can’t mitigate. I have spent much of the season watching riders in all classes have tire-related mechanical before taking the weight penalty and racing (if not riding full time) full downhill casings. More people then you would assume run these, or similar tires on trail bikes.

  • toad says:

    Get rid of the DH sidewall stuff and make a lighter 29er trail version and I would totally get the Hellkat. Kenda’s 29er options suck.

  • Kenda_Wake_UPPPP says:

    Kenda PLEASE listen up…

    Take your Small Block 8, stiffen up the sidewalls and make it in a 2.6 / 2.8 size and you will sell a TON of tires. The Small Block 8 is a GREAT tire for the desert and I “used” to buy a ton of them till Kenda stopped at a 2.1 racer weight wennie size.

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Stan’s NoTubes adds fifth tubeless rim patent


Patents describes lower rim sidewalls and how a rim’s interior shape relates to sidewall height.

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Trans-Sylvania Epic: Which tires are most popular?


The NoTubes Trans-Sylvania Epic cross country mountain bike stage race is famous for including rocky central Pennsylvania singletrack. So which tires fared best this year?

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  • Teleken says:

    No surprise what XC racer wants a 1,000 gram tire?

  • John says:

    Not having ever raced this kind of event I was somewhat confused as to why a 2.25 tire was the most widely used but a slightly narrower 2.2 was on the back.

    Any reason for a narrower tire on the rear than on the front instead?

  • mort brkr says:

    Now THIS is the types of comparos I like! Curious as to why such measurement discrepancies however.

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Find out why Vittoria supports women athletes


Many brands sponsor women athletes but few take it to the level of Vittoria. The famed Italian tire maker invests a disproportionate amount of time and money on their women’s programs.

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Find out why riders are switching to Vittoria


Tires have a legacy with riders and it takes years or decades for some to try new options. But there is a disturbance in the force as a new brand has been emerging as legitimate option.

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  • Phil Jones says:

    The new Vittoria tires are certainly a step up from the old Geax garbage, which was insanely slow and heavy. For what’s available to the general public I’ve found that (for XC racing) the new tires are better than Maxxis, but not yet at the level of Schwalbe or Continental. As an everyday tire they aren’t bad though.

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5 best reasons to use tubeless tires


One of the greatest advances in the last few years is the migration of mountain bikes toward tubeless tires. Are there any proven advantages to this setup over the traditional inner tube systems?

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  • jjj says:

    The weight savings thing is bollocks. A sensible amount of fluid will weigh more, 250ml is 400g or something like that, and its all at the outer edge so increase the rotational slightly.
    Also on non bikepark rides you’ll carry at least one tube as a backup anyway.

    But the punctures are a whole lot less. Rolling resistance im still not convinced is better, especially with lower pressures.

    It is an improvement over tubes but theres a lot of promo hype too.

    • Phil Jones says:

      250ml of sealant weighs about 255 grams (weigh it if you don’t believe me)… Futhermore sealant doesn’t effectively increase rotational weight because it’s free to move within the tire (unlike a tube) so creates negligible rotational inertia. The improvement in rolling resistance is documented literally by anyone who has ever ridden it, and in every lab that has ever done a rolling resistance test.

  • luke says:

    “1. Tubeless is lighter. 200 grams per bike lighter equates to 600 gram difference since it is rotating weight.” – sure. All the while average 29″ tube weights less than 200g and tubeless tire has to be thicker and sealant adds to total weight (and results in wheel balance issues). Having used tubeless for one season I can’t confirm all the remaining 4 benefits either. Possibly I did not care much for a difference much to forget all the tubeless setup issues that convinced to go back to messless setup.

  • Joe says:

    Weight: I use just under one of those Notubes cups of sealant per tire. I’m guessing (since it’s slightly less dense than water) that runs about 80-100 grams per tire. jjj, you use over 8 ounces per tire? Seriously?
    Punctures: I haven’t had a puncture or snakebite, running here in Utah (including the desert where cacti grow) in ten years.
    Pressures: I run as low as 15 PSI front on 2.6″ tires with that 3 ounces or so of sealant. Not sure what a tube would weigh for those tires. About 20 PSI rear with no issues.
    The whole “rotating weight argument is nonsense, except in getting the tire up to speed. Once it’s up to speed, a kilogram is a kilogram when you’re dragging it up 3000 feet.

  • Midgemagnet says:

    I get a lighter setup with Conti RaceSport flavour tyres and a latex inner tube (c. 130 g). The rolling resistance is about the same as tubeless, I don’t have to carry a spare tube, they’ve got good thorn and pinch-flat resistance, and – more importantly for me – I can fix any tyre disaster on the trail by packing a puncture repair kit, a bit of old tube and a bit of old sidewall (for patching sidewall blowouts), and a spare valve cut off an old tube.

    If I went tubeless I’d have to run heavier Conti ProTection carcasses as the RaceSport sidewalls tend to ooze sealant. I’d be tempted by tubeless if a lived in cactus country, but I don’t, so I don’t. Latex tubes have their own issues (daily inflation required, needs dusting with talc, fussy about certain rim tapes), but on balance that suits me much better than the pros and cons of a tubeless setup.

  • TimB says:

    Huh? is this a joke? Tubeless has been around since 2000 when the first UST tyres actually hit the market. Notubes, introduced their first tubeless bodge in 2001 and it worked! I’ve been using tubeless exclusively since 2000, yip 17 years and its never been a problem. Why the need for an article on going tubeless??!! Do people still need convincing? This is not as ground breaking as convincing the church that the earth isn’t flat….

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Video: Kenda Hellkat Pro and Helldiver Pro tires


Kenda has introduced two new gravity tire, the Hellkat Pro and Helldiver Pro, both featuring Advanced Gravity Casing technology, which was developed to meet the demands of the World Cup circuit.

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  • Tyre Guy says:

    After seeing the results in Lourdes, this is legit. Alexandre Fayolle 1st and Tracey Hannah 2nd in the Men’s and Women’s Elite DH.

  • bikedreamer says:

    The HellKat tread pattern looks a lot like the one found on the Tioga Factory DH tire. If they are as durable the Tiogas were, I’d happily buy a set. Hopefully the Kendas corner better on hardpack, though.

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Hot new wheels and tires round-up – part 2


See the latest from Vee, Vittoria, Panaracer, DT Swiss, Atomik Carbon, Reynolds, Hutchinson, and more

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Schwalbe Addix rubber compound primer


Schwalbe uses good rubber. But if there was an opportunity for improvement, durability on rocky terrain was it. Now the German tire maker says it’s addressed that and much more with its new Addix rubber compound.

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  • mort says:

    Great, now if you can update your U.S. website!

  • bob says:

    I have loved the Trailstar compound on my 27.5 x 2.6/2.8 Nobby Nic tires and wonder why they are not producing the NN with the Addix SOFT compound. The NN Trailstar has been an all-mountain/enduro staple and I need the better grip for rocks and roots.

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Terrene McFly 2.8 tire is do-it-all option


Terrene, a six-month-old, three-person startup out of Minneapolis, was on hand at Sea Otter showing off the McFly, a “rider-centric” all-around 2.8” mountain bike tire.

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Teravail Kennebec and Cumberland tires debut


Capitalizing on the mid-plus trend, Minneapolis-based Teravail has launched two versatile new tires, a 27.5×2.8 and 29×2.6. Not ignoring the hardliner plus crowd, it’s also unveiling a 3.0 all-arounder.

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CushCore not content to just prevent flats


Foam tire insert maker CushCore not content just to prevent flats like other inserts. Its goals are better handling and rim protection, as well as improved trail feedback.

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  • Tom says:

    Hey there,
    I’m pioneering a new tire insert that will work with both tubes and tubeless and that solves bottoming out on the rim as well as pinch and pin prick flats.
    You would all be of huge help if you could complete this super quick survey for me in order for me to conquer the war against flats and dinged rims.

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/muzzworks

    Would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks

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Schwalbe ADDIX tire compound first ride


Two years ago Schwalbe hired a mad scientist to redesign their tire compounds. The end result is claimed to offer best in class grip, durability, and rolling resistance.

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A new tire size is coming and it doesn’t suck


Plus sized erupted in popularity last year. The problem for many aggressive riders is that they didn’t hold up. Now a new tire size is coming that should split the difference between plus size and traditional tires.

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  • JCWages says:

    “Baby Fat” Awesome! Haha

  • Mark says:

    It seems to me a new mountain bike standard should be developed where bikes have internal width 30-35 mm rims, boosted hubs, and fit a broad range of tire widths from 2.4-3.0 inches. Just pick tire width depending on your conditions and personal preference. I’ve mounted everything from 1.8 to 2.4 inch wide tires on my “narrow” bikes which is a similar width range and it didn’t seem to affect the bike geometry much.

  • joseph says:

    Tire manufacturers need to stop worrying about the weight weeny crybabies and make tough durable plus tires…… if you don’t like the extra weight that comes from a aggresive trail ready plus tire……… then don’t buy one …….. stick to normal size bikes. Want a plus bike or fat bike? Deal with the weight. Now go ride.

  • jc says:

    Maxxis Rekon+ 2.8 on i35 rim is 2.63″ wide, so there you go.

  • Mark says:

    Mount a 3.0in wide tire on an i30mm (i = internal width) rim and you get a 2.8in wide tire. Mount a 2.8in wide tire on an i30mm rim and you get a 2.6in wide tire. Rule of thumb – 8mm of internal rim width change produces 0.1in of tire width change.

    • Pilot says:

      I’ve got a Specialized Camber 29er (base model) that came with 20mm wide rims. I’m not extremely pleased with the ride quality over its 2.3 wide tires. The front tire is always sliding sideways on me. It feels like there’s not enough surface area on the places I’ve been riding, especially when I’m pushing hard on climbs. So I’ve been contemplating switching to the 27.5 Plus but I don’t even know where to start and I’m not sure how much money I’d have to be spending on rims, tires, spokes, tires, plus labor for someone to do the job for me . I was really afraid of this (torn between 650b and the 29er) when I bought the bike a year ago (it was quite a bit over my budget to begin with) and now I just feel like selling the bike altogether and just buy cheaper 27.5 plus hardtail. Any ideas and opinions would be appreciated. Thank you!

  • PinkFloydLandis says:


    What’s with the rampant flats? First I’ve heard of it. I’ve put 2000 miles on my 3″ tires and have yet to flat. Same w/ my main riding partner. Article seems to give no explanation why a 2.6″ tire is fine, but on 2.8 you’ll “blow half your day patching flats.” Drop the hyperbole.

  • dddd says:

    Like the title of the article says, this “new” tire size doesn’t suck, in part because the tires are appropriately designed for current rim widths.
    And like jc says, this isn’t quite a new size, just a new designation that the tire makers will be working around with their sizing, design and marketing.
    I’ve been running the inexpensive and generously-sized Vigilante 2.3’s on my i35 rims, still gives 2.6″ width, and which works a lot better than on the i45 rims I was using.

  • Tom from RI says:

    Bought the 275 plus Stump jumper-carbon and love the bike- had nothing but problems with the Ground Control 3.0- thought the GRID was going to do the trick and the bead separated from the tire(running tubeless) have resorted to putting a tube in the rear- the front is the Purgatory and I had problems with sealant leaking through the side wall but has been fine for a while. This tire size is a work in progress- we will see how my warrantee request goes and the replacements- if not good it will be three strikes you are out…got my eye on the High Roller II and going to do some more research on tire width and relation to rim width- again knew that there were going to be some issues you cannot have such a big light tire and expect no issues. Absolutely love the bike and thinking I will end up with 2.8- I ride very aggressive technical love riding rocks- had 0 issues with the sidewall getting slashed which I have heard of- people are going to need to understand this rim width vs tire to get this the way they want it…also it is possible to just get a bad batch for those that farm out the job so that just wrecks any onesie twosie type of analysis -it could of been that one of the two of these just did not come out of the factory right- these forums are great- would love to be able to hook up my ole 26 inch trail bike with a lighter 2.5 or 2.8 if it exists-run High Roller 2.5 DH on my DH bike and 0 issues-tubeless also. These would be way to heavy for the trail.

  • dddd says:

    I should have said “…still gives [I]nearly[/I] 2.6″ width…”, and that the narrower rims did reduce sidewall-trauma issues with those tires ridden here in Auburn, CA.

  • bob says:

    how is that “new”? its 27.5+ tires…

  • meeseeks says:

    ridiculous maxxis icon+ recon+ “2.8” is no bigger than continental trail king 2,4 which coming in black chili and protection apex with same weight and twice cheaper.
    why no one asked companies who make real +size tires like WTB, Schwalbe, Duro.

    we need more sizes and also more rims for each size, don’t forget separately adventure, trail and enduro specifics tires

  • Highway Star says:

    I bought TEN 26″ tires this spring. 8x maxxis – 2.3″ to 2.5″ DHF, DHR2, Shorty, Aggressor, Minion SS. Also a pair of Schwable Nobby Nic.

    Won’t be buying any 27″ or plus tires any time soon.

  • narf narf says:

    love the 27.5 2.6″ Rocket Rons on Nox Teos. Perfec combo

  • Rodney says:

    My experience with Maxxis tires is that they are always more narrow than the tire size suggests. So is a Maxxis 2.6 really going to be a more like a normal 2.4?

  • Fo says:

    Darn and the Stan’s Flow Mk3 are 29mm inner width :-/

  • Rickets says:

    Try riding with rickets!

  • Highway Star says:

    This spring 2017 I’ve spent approximately $1000 on 26 Inch wheels and tires. A new Hadley/Flow Mk3 wheelset, and TEN 26″ tires. My bike is also all new within the last 2 years, 26″ frame and fork etc.

    I’m currently running a maxxis Shorty 26×2.5″ Front and 26×2.4″ DHR2 Rear on the Mk3’s. These are HUGE, soft rubber, GRIPPY tires, and at 875g-925g on a 460g rim, they are right on the far limit of is acceptable in weight on a trail bike. They are also not too big to feel floppy bouncy like a plus size. They roll over everything but can still be handled accurately.

    Anyone riding a 27.5″, I strongly recommend getting you hands on a 26″ wheelset with a roughly 30mm inner width, and trying a 750g-900g set of 2.4-2.5″ tires. Keep in the actual difference between 26″ and 650b (27.5″) is only an inch, and a half inch in radius. Compared to a 27.5″ with a 2.2″ tire, the 26×2.5 will be extremely close on ride height and rollover, a similar overall weight, sharper handling, stiffer, stronger, quicker, and will obviously be wider and more grippy.

  • Roger says:

    All the planned obsolescence has ruined mountain biking for me. You guys with big wallets can continue keeping up with the Jones’s. I’ll be buying used 26ers and parts.

    • Christian Ahlmann says:

      Roger, I just tuned up my 1999 Cannondale Super V with Lefty fork and 26″ wheels. Rides great. We’re on the same page ; )

  • gg says:

    Highway Star’s proposal looks interesting.
    MTBR make this happen within an El Comparo or shootout.

  • Stunnerbear says:

    I have a few bikes in the quiver and choosing the right one is just a matter of attitude. Of course choosing the right bike for the right ride does make a difference. For me time is my biggest enemy and the easier it is to set up and go, the easier it is for me to ride more. I choose carefully this year for my new bike and I got an S works Fuse and right away put 2.8 Rocket Rons in the lightest set up I could. Got the bike down to 24.5 lbs with pedals 2 cages and a multi tool. Once I got the tire pressure figured out 13.5 to 14 front and 16 to 17 rear I can now ride this bike faster than I could ever ride my 5″ full sus. trail bike of near same weight. It’s really more about your style and skill that makes what you choose right for you. I wanted a HT trail, light enduro shredder that I could send over doubles and go downhill fast. I guess what I am getting at is this tire option is way better than my 29er CX race bike and more fun than my 26er 5″ trail bike.

  • GuyOnMtb says:

    Didn’t the industry a year ago say the same thing about 30mm rims for 2.5 tires?

    The issue to “refine” fat tires into Plus tires, into Sub+ tires, to finally create the 2.6″ was a waste of energy and time. 2.5″ casings could have been refined and the tread patterns could be widened across the 2.5″ casing to create a tire with less weight then the “new 2.6 standard”.

    New standards before I can break my current standards; is merely a push to create more revenue and screw the consumer out on compatibility and longevity.

    Maybe next we can throw away the 31.8 handlebar and only have 35 bars, leaving about 3 tons of unused aluminum. Or, maybe we can make the BMX rear axle diameter a new standard on MTB?

    Know why this article didn’t have one pro-rider answering questions? Because they would have asked why we are no longer working on 30mm-35mm x 2.5″.

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Inside the mind of Maxxis


Within mountain bike circles the Taiwanese tire maker has a rock solid foothold, especially among the trail, all-mountain, and downhill crowds where models such as the Minion, High Roller, and Shorty have cult-like followings. Click through to learn more.

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  • Wayne Onyschuk says:

    Nobody who wants to be competitive at an autocross is running Maxxis tires, at least in the US. Bridgestone and BFG are tops, with Hankook, Dunlop and Kuhmo behind them.

  • pjm says:

    WE WANT 26″ wheel size options in 2.5 to 2.8 to 3.0!!! How many times do we have to ask you to give us 26″ options? You do currently, but they are limited. Many tire companies, which are touting mid-fat tires, are AGAIN ignoring the 26″ crowd. Grow up and realize that in the early 1920’s, 29″ and 28″ were king, but eventually realized that the best wheel size was 26″ ballooner for handling multiple surfaces. Duh…..

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