e*thirteen 9-46t TRSr 1×11 cassette first look

Best in class 511% range combined with 303-gram weight

Components
Just like SRAM's Eagle set-up, the large cog casts a long shadow over the rear brake rotor.

Just like SRAM’s Eagle set-up, the large cog casts a long shadow over the rear brake rotor.

Many if not most mountain bikers prefer 1x systems these days. These 1×11 and 1×12 drivetrain systems have introduced a new era of simplicity and reliability, freeing up dropper post lever real estate and opening up new frame design possibilities. Many will never go back to 2x systems, but the desire to have lower gears still exists, too. The e*thirteen TRS+ introduced last year was a success, with a 9-44t range. Now comes the new TRSr, which is the perfect evolution of the system, increasing the biggest cog to 46t.

Package comes with two parts of the cassette, a lock ring and a tool.

The package comes with two parts of the cassette, a lock ring and a tool.

The good news is that e*thirteen didn’t just swap out the big 44t with a 46t. Rather, they changed the three top rings to 33-39-46 to maintain shifting performance. And to our surprise, the weight dropped to 303 grams (287 claimed) compared to the smaller TRS+’s 320 grams.

Actual weight on our test unit is 303 grams.

Actual weight on our test unit was 303 grams.

That weight number compares favorably to SRAM Eagle’s 354-gram 10-50 cassette. Additional weight savings can be had with a shorter chain and smaller front chainring (to achieve the same gear ratio). It’s also worth noting that the Shimano XT 1×11 cassette is quite a bit heavier at 441 grams, while the SRAM X01 10-42t 11-speed cassette is 255 grams.

Design and Compatibility

Using the SRAM XD hub body, e*thirteen was able to fit a 9-tooth since the smaller cogs are actually floating and not wrapped around the hub body. The trick was locking the cogs in place, and that’s were e*thirteen designed an ingenious locking mechanism. The two cassette halves lock into each other with a design that’s proven to be reliable over the past year.

The three big cogs are 33-39 and 46 tooth.

The three big cogs are 33, 39 and 46 tooth.

Riding Impressions

We’ve taken this out on a couple rides and we’re pleased to report that it performs as well as the TRS+ we previously tested. The 46t is most welcome, as it is an increase that can definitely be felt. The shift to the 46t is smooth with only a little tightening of the b-tension screw to keep the upper pulley from getting too close to the big cog. Shifts on the big cogs felt natural and even.

On the smaller cogs, the shift from the 10t to the 9t was smooth as well. It was a progressive shift that felt seamless while pedaling. The lone problem was the jump from 12t to 10t, which felt abrupt just as in all 10-42 systems. The 9t ring doesn’t feel like the most efficient gear in the selection, but it definitely helps avoid the dreaded ‘spinning out’ on the commute back home from the trail.

The smaller cogs are steel and the unit locks on to the big cluster.

The smaller cogs are steel and the unit locks on to the big cluster.

Another pleasant revelation is that although we don’t anticipate needing the 9t for our local trails, it allows us to reduce our chainring size without losing the high gear range of our old drivetrain. For example, we can drop the front from 32t to 30t and still be satisfied with the high gear. That saves weight, too.

Specifications
  • Gears: 9-10-12-14-17-20-24-28-33-39-46
  • Compatibility: XD driver and Shimano 11-speed
  • Weight: 303g
  • Price: $349
Range Comparison
  • TRSr 9-46t 11sp: 511%
  • SRAM Eagle 12sp 10-50t: 500%
  • TRS+ 11sp 9-44t: 489% TRS+
  • 10sp 9-42t: 467%
  • SRAM XX1 11sp 10-42t: 420%
  • Shimano 11sp 11-46t 418%
The big three cogs are secured by the lockring. The smaller cogs lock on to the big cogs securely.

The big three cogs are secured by the lockring. The smaller cogs lock on to the big cogs securely.

Weight
  • TRSr 11sp 303g
  • SRAM Eagle 362g
  • Shimano XT M8000: 441g
The TRSr has a smooth transition between rings.

The TRSr has a smooth transition between rings.

And in case you were wondering install with the included tool and a single chain whip is fairly straight forward. And it will fit on XD driver body hubs as well, with no prying apart cassettes or modifying derailleurs.

For more info please visit bythehive.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Francis Cebedo

The founder of mtbr and roadbikereview, Francis Cebedo believes that every cyclist has a lot to teach and a lot to learn. "Our websites are communal hubs for sharing cycling experiences, trading adventure stories, and passing along product information and opinions." Francis' favorite bike is the last bike he rode, whether it's a dirt jumper, singlespeed, trail bike, lugged commuter or ultralight carbon road steed. Indeed, Francis loves cycling in all its forms and is happiest when infecting others with that same passion. Francis also believes that IPA will save America.


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