Fastest bike at Tour Divide: Mike Hall’s Pivot LES 29er

British endurance racer takes second race win and sets new course record

29er Race Coverage
It’s rare to see such an incredible performance on the Tour Divide. Many times bad weather in the form of rain, snow and/or mud prevents racers from putting in such fast rides. But that was not the case for Mike Hall this year. Preparation and experience are also of the utmost importance, and for Hall it was a performance that has been many years in the making that all finally came together this June. Photo by Eddie Clark

It’s rare to see such an incredible performance on the Tour Divide. Many times bad weather in the form of rain, snow and/or mud prevents racers from putting in such fast rides. But that was not the case for Mike Hall this year. Preparation and experience are also of the utmost importance, and for Hall it was a performance that has been many years in the making that all finally came together this June. Photo by Eddie Clark

The third time at the Tour Divide proved to be a charm for British endurance racer Mike Hall. Hall took his second victory in the self-supported 2745-mile race that roughly follows the Continental Divide from Banff, Canada, to Antelope Wells, New Mexico, and includes nearly 200,000 feet of vertical (equivalent to ascending Mount Everest from sea-level 7 times). In 2013, Hall was on pace to set a new course record, but forest fires required an off-course reroute that negated any chances at the record. However, this time around the weather and course conditions were favorable, as was the performance of his well dialed Pivot LES 29er carbon hardtail race bike. Indeed, Hall set a new Tour Divide course record of 13 days, 22 hours, 51 minutes, breaking the previous record by 12 hours, 46 minutes. Hall’s average distance per day was 194.1 miles with total moving time of 10:14:36, with stops for rest and refueling making up the additional time. Photographer Eddie Clark was on scene and provided this up close look at the bike that got Hall to the finish line in New Mexico.

Hall’s 2016 bike was much like his second Tour Divide Pivot LES 29er with the obvious difference being the color. Technically, the big difference is this frame was built around the boost 148 hub standard. Also similar were the Shimano XTR brakes and drivetrain, however his 2016 bike received an upgrade in the form of the electronic Shimano Di2 shifters and rear derailleur. Additionally, this year Hall ran a Race Face 38-tooth chainring mated to an 11-speed 11-40 XTR cassette. Photo by Eddie Clark

Hall’s 2016 bike was much like his second Tour Divide Pivot LES 29er with the obvious difference being the color. Technically, the big difference is this frame was built around the boost 148 hub standard. Also similar were the Shimano XTR brakes and drivetrain, however his 2016 bike received an upgrade in the form of the electronic Shimano Di2 shifters and rear derailleur. Additionally, this year Hall ran a Race Face 38-tooth chainring mated to an 11-speed 11-40 XTR cassette. Photo by Eddie Clark

Continue to page 2 to learn more about Mike Hall’s race winning bike »


About the author: Mtbr

Mtbr.com is a site by mountain bikers for mountain bikers. We are the best online resource for information for mountain bikers of all abilities, ages and interests.


Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Mike Curiak says:

    Bike geeking is fascinating, but the only thing the bike can do in this case is not get in the rider’s way. What Mike did on the divide route this year is next level, and requires an unthinkable amount of dedication and sacrifice. Either that or he’s simply inhuman and the task is therefore easy.

    Chapeau, Mike. Well done.

  • dan says:

    Will there be a show or documentary for this event/Hall’s win? I’m speechless, almost, at what all the entrants do physically and mentally.

  • bob says:

    not to diminish the effort and great victory – but im genuinely surprised at the equipment choices they all make.
    i would drop some spare clothing and wear the same merino clothes, with an occasional water wash for example.
    i’d also run much skinner tires, 2.2 have such a huge efficiency impact (weight, aero, contact) compared to 32c tires with a fully static frame, yet the later can do what the race requires just as well. A lot of the packing could also be more aero.

    Heck my 140mm trail bike runs 2.2 and clears huge jumps, crazy rocks and roots, etc. (yeah i know the trend is more like 2.5 – it doesnt mean its the ideal choice though)

    given all this i wouldnt be surprised if that record gets broken again in the future years, maybe by the same guy even!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*


THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.