FOX High Pressure Digital Shock Pump

Gear

There is a nice thumb indentation just in front of the gauge so that you have something to hold onto for stability while pumping. The air release or bleed button functions nicely, and you can punch it hard for dumping big chunks of air, or use a delicate tap to drop micro amounts, and it’s surprising how easy it is to perform any adjustment required.

A short tap and hold of the On button gets the digital gauge booted up, and it will auto set to whatever was the last scale that was being used. Hitting the button again cycles through the pressure scales: PSI, BAR, kPa and KG/CM². When reading pressures in psi, the readout is in increments of 0.5 from 0-199.5 psi, and then it increments to 1 from 200 to 300 psi. The other scales stay at the same increments for their entire range. I am not sure you’ll need the other scales (maybe the bar), as they seem superfluous, and I certainly have never used any of the others? The readout stays on for around 1 minute without any usage, and will then auto shutoff, and I found that more than enough time to check the readout, and sit on the bike to check sag, etc.

Output range:

  • 0-300 PSI (Increments of 0.5 for 0-199.5 psi, Increments of 1 for 200 to 300 psi)
  • 0-20.70 BAR (Increments of 0.05 Bar)
  • 0-21.10 kg/cm2 (Increments of 0.05 kg/cm2)
  • 0-2065 kPa (increments of 5 kPa)

The pump is not a lab rated unit, so the accuracy is sort of ambiguous, but it’s in the ball park, meaning its close enough for comfort. What the pump has is rock solid stability (no drift) over time and usage. Once you have become accustomed to the pump, and what its particular readings are in relation to your bikes, just use those as a standard of accuracy. Most any pump on the market has accuracy issues, but what counts instead is the repetition of what value x means, and that every time you use the pump again, the value of x is still the same pressure (accurate or not). This pump nails that repetition on its head. A truly accurate pump isn’t portable or practical for normal usage, since it requires a larger battery, gauge, internals, and costs substantially more. What really matters in the long run is that required sag gets set and/or that the suspension feels proper.

Side note => Like most any pump, there is always a small of amount of air that lingers in the hose, so that when you disconnect the pump, that air is lost in the total relationship to the shocks pressure and the gauges last reading. The gauge measures a total pressure value of x, which is a combination of the shocks value of y along with the hose value of z. I found the value of the lingering air in the hose to be between 2-4psi (or more) on this pump, which depends greatly on how you disconnect the Schrader connector. Again, the lost psi during disconnect is meaningless if you are always using the same method for checking the pressure: connect, pump or bleed to your designated psi, disconnect, check sag if needed, repeat. Once you have defined that 95psi is the sweet spot for your pump, your done.

I really liked the digital gauge, since it was a no brainer to know exactly what the numbers stated, as there was no guessing trying to interpolate between the markings on the gauge and the needle. As my eye sight has gotten poorer with age the analog gauge designs are tougher to use and read. The 0.5 increments for psi allowed very precise settings, making it easy to bleed or add air to meet requirements. You get instant reinforcement of what the pressure is with this design and format. Easier readability, plain and simple, and the large size of the LCD numbers was a bonus.

Measured Specs:

  • Weight – 217 grams
  • Length – 240mm
  • Stroke length – 120mm

At 217 grams it weighs slightly more than some other pumps on the market, and at $70 it costs nearly twice as much, but it is more durable (so far) and the design and features are certainly very user friendly. Most of the analog competition retails from $35-$50, and weighs between 180-220 grams. The battery for the digital gauge is not serviceable or rechargeable, but FOX implies that the battery will outlast the shock?

FOX High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Gallery
1
of
×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Features

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Usage

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Readout

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Bottom

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Button

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Extended

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Side

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump Various Shots

×

Fox High Pressure Digital Shock Pump

×

fox_digital_shootout

×

fox_digital_thumbs

About the author: Brian Mullin

Brian has been part of the Mtbr team since 2007, where he has become an integral member of the review and test staff, specializing in technical articles. He likes to push the limits in all the sports he obsesses in, whether it's mountain biking, whitewater kayaking, extreme skiing, or sport climbing. He takes those same strengths and a good dose of insanity to his reviewing and writing on mountain biking products, creating technical, in-depth and hyperbolic articles. Whenever he's not on the bike, he might be found watching MotoGP racing, otherwise look for him out on extremely technical singletrack.


(Visited 8,486 times, 1 visits today)

Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Bog says:

    This is the same pump as Rock Shox is using. I find it tough to use as the pressure (and pumping force) go above 200 psi in a read shock because there is really nothing to hold onto besides that small thumb indentation. If you hold higher up on the handle you risk damaging the gauge or hitting the bleed button.

    • Rich says:

      The biggest issue I have is realizing exactly how much pressure is lost when disconnecting the unit. How does this pump differ?

      • Brian Mullin says:

        Rich – I updated the article on the subject: “Like most any pump, there is always a small of amount of air that lingers in the hose, so that when you disconnect the pump, that air is lost in the total relationship to the shocks pressure and the gauges last reading. The gauge measures a total pressure value of x, which is a combination of the shocks value of y along with the hose value of z. I found the value of the lingering air in the hose to be between 2-4psi (or more) on this pump, which depends greatly on how you disconnect the Schrader connector. Again, the lost psi during disconnect is meaningless if you are always using the same method for checking the pressure: connect, pump or bleed to your designated psi, disconnect, check sag if needed, repeat. Once you have defined that 95psi is the sweet spot for your pump, your done.”

    • Brian Mullin says:

      Bog – At high pressures you need to resort to grasping the pump with your hand, and the use your index finger on the end. It was easy not to touch the bleed button or gauge. I tested pumping four different pumps the other night, and they all required the same technique.

  • ginsu says:

    Little trick to prevent excess pressure loss when removing a Fox pump. When disconnecting the pump push the handle down at the same time so the air pressure is pushing out air, thus preventing as much leakage. Seems to work for me.

    But I agree the pumps should have a seal near the head so you don’t have to fill the hose with your tire during disconnect.

  • Ted says:

    can you help me how to replace battery pls? Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*