Goodyear launches new line of bicycle tires

Four mountain bike models among extensive product range

27.5 29er News Tires
Goodyear

Goodyear is back in the bicycle tire business after a four-decade absence.

There’s a new player in the bicycle tire business and it’s a big one. The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company of Akron, Ohio, known for its promotional blimps and extensive line of automotive, truck, motorcycle, industrial, and airplane tires, has joined other major tire manufacturers by introducing a line of tires for the two-wheel, human-powered set.

This actually signals a return for Goodyear, which began in 1898 with bicycle tires, making them until 1976. The company is named after Charles Goodyear, the inventor of vulcanized rubber. Among its impressive past, Goodyear introduced the first tubeless tires for automobiles in 1903. They also have a long involvement in motorsports, sponsoring the Indianapolis 500, Formula 1, and NASCAR.

Now back in the cycling world, Goodyear has gone all in with a complete lineup of mountain, road, gravel, and city/touring tires. For more on road, gravel, and touring models head to Roadbikereview.com.

Goodyear Newton

The mountain bike range of tires covers everything from cross-country, with the Peak, to enduro, with the Newton ST DH Ultimate (pictured).

As you read this, key bicycle retailers will have Goodyear product on their shelves. Hawley handles distribution in the United States. In Canada, Lambert is the sole Goodyear distributor.

Developed in partnership with Rubber Kinetics and longtime cycling industry veteran Luke Musselman, the models cover an extensive range, but trend towards the more premium in terms of pricing and performance. The entire mountain bike line, as well as the road, gravel, and some of the touring models use Goodyear’s Tubeless Complete technology. With airtight sidewalls, installing the tires with a floor pump is easy thanks to a softer material around the bead to help it conform and seal on the rim bead. With a sample size of two pair of tires, Mtbr can confirm that tubeless setup is excellent.

With four tires, two constructions, and three casing options, Goodyear’s mountain bike tire range is its largest, providing a broad range of options for the diverse needs of mountain bikers. The range receives model specific compounding and uses Goodyear’s Tubeless Complete throughout. Likewise, the entire line is e-bike rated. Here’s a rundown of the mountain bike line. Expect in-depth reviews in the coming months.

Goodyear Peak

The Peak is Goodyear’s XC race tire. Offered in 27.5×2.2 and 29×2.2 sizes, it uses a single ply to save weight and a tread pattern with a priority on speed.

Peak

A purebred, cross-country tire, the Peak uses Goodyear’s Tubeless Complete casing, Dynamic:A/T compound, and a lightweight, single ply casing. The Peak is offered in the more expensive Ultimate construction, as well as the more affordable Premium construction. The extra cost delivers a lighter, suppler tire. We have a few rides on the Peak and it handled rock-strewn trails without any trouble. The fast-rolling tread design rolls quickly and transitions in cornering nicely. But like any XC tire it’s easy to get in over your head on loose descents.

  • Sizes: 27.5×2.2 and 29×2.2
  • Casings: Single ply
  • Constructions: Premium and Ultimate
  • Pricing: $60 Premium, $70 Ultimate
Goodyear Escape

With widely spaced square knobs, the Escape looks like a great, all-round trail tire. It is offered in four sizes, with size specific casings.

Escape

The Escape is Goodyear’s trail tire and we expect it to be the most popular with the Mtbr crowd. It is designed for a wide range of trail conditions and features widely spaced, square knobs for good all-round traction. The Escape uses DYNAMIC:R/T compounding and comes in 2.35 and 2.6 widths. While the 2.35 sizes use a standard, single ply construction, a heavier EN casing with one and half plies is used on the wider 2.6 versions. We have test samples on the way, so stay tuned for more detailed ride impressions in the coming weeks.

  • Sizes: 27.5×2.35 and 2.6; and 29x 2.35 and 2.6
  • Casings: Size specific single ply (2.35) and EN 1.5 ply (2.6)
  • Constructions: Premium and Ultimate
  • Pricing: 2.35 – $65 Premium, $75 Ultimate; 2.6 – $70 EN Premium, $80 EN Ultimate
Goodyear Newton

Goodyear’s Newton is its front/rear capable gravity tire. It is offered in two casings and four sizes.

Newton

The Newton (as in Sir Issac) is one half of Goodyear’s gravity mountain bike tire line. It can be used front or rear, or as a rear paired with the Newton ST up front. It comes in 2.4 and 2.6 widths and Goodyear’s 1.5-ply EN casing and a burlier 2-ply DH casing. The DH casing is only offered in the Ultimate construction to maximize traction. Based on the tread pattern, the Newton looks like a worthy adversary to the popular Maxxis Minion.

  • Sizes: 27.5×2.4 and 2.6; and 29×2.4 and 2.6
  • Casings: EN 1.5 ply, DH 2-ply
  • Constructions: Premium and Ultimate
  • Pricing: EN Premium $70, EN Ultimate $80, DH Ultimate $90
Goodyear Newton ST

The Newton ST is a front specific, gravity tire with tall, supported side knobs and ramped center knobs.

Newton ST

The Newton ST rounds out the gravity line with a front specific tread pattern that features ramped center knobs and taller, arch-supported side knobs. It should provide excellent cornering and braking grip. The ST is offered in the same sizes as the Newton and features the same construction and casing options. Goodyear recommends the EN casing when trail feel is a priority and the DH casing for aggressive riding and increased durability.

  • Sizes: 27.5×2.4 and 2.6; and 29×2.4 and 2.6
  • Casings: EN 1.5 ply, DH 2-ply
  • Constructions: Premium and Ultimate
  • Pricing: EN Premium $70, EN Ultimate $80, DH Ultimate $90

For more information, visit www.goodyearbike.com.


About the author: Nick Legan

Nick Legan is happiest with some grease under his nails and a long dirt climb ahead. As a former WorldTour team mechanic, Legan plied his trade at all the Grand Tours, Spring Classics, World Championships and even the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In recent years, gravel and ultra-distance racing has a firm grip on Legan’s attention, but his love of mountain biking and long road rides hasn’t diminished. Originally a Hoosier, Legan settled in Boulder, Colorado, 14 years ago after finishing his time at Indiana University studying French and journalism. He served as the technical editor at VeloNews for two years and now contributes to Adventure Cyclist, Mtbr and RoadBikeReview.


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