How and why you should try the high line

Picking new lines to gain free speed

How To Video
Being creative with line choice can be rewarding. Rather than taking the regular line, keep your eyes open for high lines that can help you unlock free speed.

Being creative with line choice can be rewarding. Rather than taking the regular line, keep your eyes open for high lines that can help you unlock free speed.

Picking lines is an art. Do it right and you can pick up free speed, do it wrong and you might end up off track. The key is being creative. That’s where following friends or locals can really help you get faster, but just knowing what to look for is also helpful.

One trick the crew at GMBN espouses is trying the high line. They can look scary, but the benefits include smoother lines, better braking, and more space for turning. This technique is also really helpful for hitting switchbacks.

One thing to remember, the GMBN crew is showing this technique for closed-course racing. Don’t take it upon yourself to start burning in new lines on your local public trails.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

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  • gg says:

    So if everyone rides like this the trail becomes a shite bomb field, accelerating erosion, making maintenance ridiculous if not impossible and widening the trail.
    Overall this is bad advice for the general population!
    Remove this video – Grade F.

  • zoso says:

    @gg: Clearly this advice applies to racing only. Der.

  • R says:

    Yes. Take this video down. You’ll have every stravatard ruining their trails to save a second.

    Its bad enough that every video seems to glorify skidding and throwing dirt everywhere

  • Guy OnMTB says:

    Guys, this is a bike park, not public trail systems; it’s implied in the video visually with the streamer lines on the side of the “track”(it’s a trail, but as it’s maintained by a private company on private land, and used for a specific ride discipline, it’s more of a track).

    The people who go to these parks pay money to use the park. The money is used to upkeep those tracks as well as take care of other park overhead(cost; lift operators, concessions, administrations, maintenance). They design the bike park with aggressive MTB in mind, so it’s acknowledge by the community that there with be regularly scheduled trail maintenance. The maintenance will most likely be organized by the private company that will provide power tools and construction equipment with licensed and authorized operators who also know how to build trails. Some resorts will publicly announce what dates they could use volunteers as some of these resorts know their locals like to help, just to be outdoors. Some resorts just pay to have the work done by contractors or park employees so the maintenance or construction can happen quickly; because it’s not always easy to get all the numbers of people you need simply through volunteer work, so some resorts have payed help and volunteers working the same projects in different phases.

    And, as far as the Strava issue goes. No one can stop the self-entitled from doing as they please. Not even when we have sanctions on an entire user base.

    In short; there is always a potential for people to do bad things; a video that does not sit well with ones perspective will not change anything if a removal were granted. Even if the video had never existed, the self-entitled will still do as they please regardless of skill level, and will most likely continue to build their skills where they are not supposed to, in ways that are destructive. I’d like to add, that not every rider that practices their skills in unsanctioned areas leaves a path of destruction behind. Many riders go rework segments they damaged.

    Trying to hide an issue does not teach to have compassion and understand compromise to help people become more responsible to themselves..

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