How to install a KS LEV Integra dropper post

As internally-routed frames become standard, this process is key

Components How To

Editor’s Note: This article is courtesy of the team at Art’s Cyclery. The original post can be found here.

So you just brought home a KS LEV Integra dropper post, and now it’s time to do the install. As you’ve probably guessed, it’s a bit more involved than dealing with an externally routed version. But as internally-routed frames become the standard, this is a process we all need to know. Learn more in this video.

Here’s a recap of what you just saw. The first thing to do is note the seat height with either your previous post or the new post in its extended position installed. Measure from the center of the bottom bracket spindle to the center of the saddle rails. Write down the measurement so you don’t forget, then remove the seatpost.

Most people mount the lever on the left side to take the place of the front shifter on a 1x system. Photo courtesy of Art's Cyclery

Most people mount the lever on the left side to take the place of the front shifter on a 1x system. Photo courtesy of Art’s Cyclery

Next, mount the remote lever. Most people mount the lever on the left side to take the place of the front shifter on a 1x system. Even with 2x systems, front shifts aren’t as common so the left side remains a good choice. After mounting the lever, remove the post from the frame and run the housing that will go to the post. Most frames that accept internally routed seatposts have guides that will feed the housing into the seat tube with minimal effort.

Once the housing comes out of the top of the seat tube, connect the housing to the bottom of the post and insert the post into the frame to the original seat height. As you push the post down into the frame, gently pull the housing where it exits the frame, but not hard enough to pull it off the post. With the post is at the correct extension, turn the handlebars as far as you foresee needing them to be able to turn, usually a full 180 degrees if the other cables allow it. Now cut the seatpost housing to fit into the remote lever with the bars turned.

Most frames that accept internally routed seatposts have guides that will feed the housing into the seat tube with minimal effort. Photo courtesy of Art's Cyclery

Most frames that accept internally routed seatposts have guides that will feed the housing into the seat tube with minimal effort. Photo courtesy of Art’s Cyclery

Once the housing is cut, mark the post at the top of the collar, remove the post, and run the cable through the housing. Push the cable through the housing and then once again pull the housing so that it is coming out of the top of the seat tube. This may require you to turn the handlebar toward the spot where it enters the frame or potentially removing the remote from the bar, but make sure the housing is still firmly attached to the remote.

Now that the cable is through the housing, pull the cable tight to remove any slack and set the housing into the guide KS provides that was attached to the bottom of the post. Slide the barrel clamp onto the cable until it is sitting on the top of the guide. Snug the barrel onto the cable and you can remove the cable and housing from the guide. Next you’ll want to fully tighten the barrel to the cable and cut the cable at the top of the barrel. Finally, connect the barrel and insert the housing into the bottom of the post, and re-insert the post into the bike to the desired height. If there is any dead throw in the remote lever use the barrel adjuster to take up the slack and you’ll be good to go.

Connect the barrel and insert the housing into the bottom of the post, and re-insert the post into the bike to the desired height. Photo courtesy of Art's Cyclery

Connect the barrel and insert the housing into the bottom of the post, and re-insert the post into the bike to the desired height. Photo courtesy of Art’s Cyclery

If you’re looking for a new seatpost, be sure to check out the Art’s Cyclery social media outlets twice-a-week for the mystery sale and a sitewide discount code. You’ll find them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Arts Cyclery

This article was originally published on the Art's Cyclery Blog. Art's Cyclery is dedicated to offering free expert advice, how-to videos, and in-depth product reviews on ArtsCyclery.com to help riders make an educated decision when selecting cycling gear.


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