Is this the steepest line ever?

Who really knows, but the pucker factor is off the charts

Video
This would be a good guy to consult on the topic of tire traction.

This would be a good guy to consult on the topic of tire traction.

Warning: If you are afraid of heights don’t watch this video. And if you are offended by the “F” word, cover your ears and then marvel as Moab local Kyle Mears drops into one of the steepest lines we’ve ever seen.

A video posted by Nate Hills (@natehills1) on

Want more Moab mastery from Mears? Check out this video where he and fellow hairball rider Nate Hills ride some more impossible lines. Guarantee your palms will sweat. Damn these guys are good.

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  • Pmac says:

    I’ve been waiting to see a video of someone riding this line. Kenny Smith did it back in 2011 but all I could find was a pic – http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/6604067/

  • Dane says:

    So that’s the thing with long-distance photos/videos–you lose all depth perspective. I’m not saying I would ride this line, but given his speed it can’t be nearly as steep as it looks. Even with the best tires on earth there’s a limit to how much you can slow down on slick rock type surfaces.

  • tmc says:

    Front on views of rock faces can be deceptive but if you look at the Kenny Smith photo, which has much better resolution and a bit different angle than the video, you can see that the top 25%, where Mears balances on his brake, is a 45 degree slab. The next 25%, where he lets it go, is steep (probably around 60 degrees but only 25 to 30 feet long). The bottom 50% eases up gradually to the run out at the bottom. Anybody who thinks this is trivial should go look at it from the upper slab. Take a rope!

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