KCNC Ti Pro Seatpost Review

Pro Reviews

Bottom Line:
In the 5 months of use the newer KCNC Ti Pro Lite seatpost has not given me any issues, and it should have even better durability than its already durable predecessor . The larger bolts (M6 vs M5) have helped keep the yoke system squeak free, have less flex and should prevent any of the reported bolt breakage issues from occurring. I did not do any empirical tests, but the new seatpost also feels slightly stiffer.

The new KCNC Ti Pro Lite seatpost is a winner, its lightweight, durable, slightly stiffer, has larger bolts and comes in colors. The yoke system can be a pain to use and might not be the best system for heavier riders or downhillers.

Strengths:
-Durable
-Colors
-Larger bolts
-Lightweight

Weaknesses:
-Yoke system

Value Rating: 3.5 Flamin’ Chili Peppers
Overall Rating: 4.5 Flamin’ Chili Peppers

KCNC Ti-Pro Specs:

Tube material – Scandium T7
Yoke system material – 7075 Aluminum
Bolts – Ti 6V-4Al, size M6x45 and M6x35
Colors – Red, Blue and Gold
Sizes – 27.2×400, 30.9×400 and 31.6×400
Weight – 166.9 grams (verified)
MSRP – $125?

KCNC US url: http://kcnc-usa.com/component/option,com_frontpage/Itemid,1/
KCNC url: http://www.kcnc.com.tw

About the author: Brian Mullin

Brian has been part of the Mtbr team since 2007, where he has become an integral member of the review and test staff, specializing in technical articles. He likes to push the limits in all the sports he obsesses in, whether it's mountain biking, whitewater kayaking, extreme skiing, or sport climbing. He takes those same strengths and a good dose of insanity to his reviewing and writing on mountain biking products, creating technical, in-depth and hyperbolic articles. Whenever he's not on the bike, he might be found watching MotoGP racing, otherwise look for him out on extremely technical singletrack.


(Visited 32,153 times, 5 visits today)

Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Wish I Were Riding says:

    Looks good, but there definitely isn’t much room for setback…

  • Wish I Were Riding says:

    Oh yeah, one other big point… Scandium is NOT ti, which is what this product seems to market itself as. I doubt it would ride the same as a real ti post.

    • Don says:

      That’s because the post isn’t TI. The bolts are TI. The post is aluminum + scandium. Would you expect aluminum and scandium to ride like TI?!

  • Brian Mullin says:

    The only Titanium that I am aware of on the seatpost is the bolts! I am currently reviewing the Lynskey Ti seatpost. It has the same Yoke styled system (albeit with a special carbon rail support) as all the other lightweight seatposts, but it has a full Ti tube. It definitely has the silky feel of Ti to it, but the stiffness of the KCNC post allows you better power transition when you are hammering. It is a tradeoff?

  • pat walker says:

    Why does the seat post say Ti when its scandium?
    The seat post should say Ti Bolts.
    I would not buy anything from a company that does business like this.

    • Sam says:

      The only Titanium that I am aware of on the seatpost is the bolts! I am cutrlnrey reviewing the Lynskey Ti seatpost. It has the same Yoke styled system (albeit with a special carbon rail support) as all the other lightweight seatposts, but it has a full Ti tube. It definitely has the silky feel of Ti to it, but the stiffness of the KCNC post allows you better power transition when you are hammering. It is a tradeoff?

  • rensho says:

    I ride these posts, but it is essentially impossible to keep the saddle from sliding backwards. I end up bending the Ti rails due to the support system and how tight the clamp needs to be. 2 years on 3 of these. The best upgrade is to use a Thomson bottom plate, as it fully supports the bottom of the rails. After a while, my SLR ti rails broke at the support point of the bottom ‘clamp’.

  • mountain_bomber156 says:

    Very unique setup you got there, Brian. Always seen this thing on WW race bikes, never on a 5.5″ trailbike.

  • Ruger says:

    Scandium is atomic# 21 on the periodic table, Scandium is #22. So they are very similar in weight and other properties. Titanium is much more common than Scandium being the earths 7th most common element. Scandium is only the 50th most common element.
    Much more expensive, Scandium is less resistant to weathering than Titanium.
    The post is as indicated Aluminum alloy with Scandium added.

    That said, I believe that the Thompson seatposts are the best mankind has to offer.
    But red is cool! Would match my Venti rotors.

  • I too have problems keeping the saddle from sliding on the rails. If you overtighten you can bend the ti bolts. The cylinder that the bolts goes through goes in only one direction, if you put it in the wrong way it will bend, so when you take your’s apart check it before u put it back together.

    and combine it with a ti railed saddle and it squeaks like anything.

    KCNC has been very good about getting me replacement parts when I do break stuff though (bolts and that cylinder piece)

    I’m going to try that trick of using a thomson bottomplate. sounds like a good idea

  • mntbikerbob47 says:

    At what point does ‘a heavier rider’ begin? Is there a weight limit for those of us who aren’t 150lbs?

  • pastajet says:

    I have been using the KCNC posts for around 3 years, and never had any issues with the saddle sliding nor bent parts, all I have had is the occasional squeak form the bolts. I might suggest sliding the post all the way back, which works well anyway since it’s a zero setback post, that should alleviate any sliding issues?

    Heavy riders would be in the 200-220lb or greater range?

  • oldassraacer says:

    mine squeaks quite a bit – I have lubed it several places and used anti-seize / ti prep on the bolts

    Where else should be lubed?

  • mario says:

    First of all, it is NOT made of scandium. It’s an aluminum allow with a very little addition of scandium. However, that little scandium makes aluminum much harder and resistant, and hence you can make bicycle frames and other parts with less of the alloy, thus making them lighter.

    Second: the argument about seatpost stiffness is silly: seatposts do not bend under a human cyclist. Some may break, but their bending is so little that it is not perceptible without accurate measuring equipment. If the bending during cycling was, in fact, perceptible, it would cause the quick failure of any aluminum seatpost due to fatigue (this is not the case for titanium seatposts, but that’s a long story).

  • mario says:

    That seatpost contains 0.5% in weight of scandium. Probably less. That means, the whole seatpost contains less than 1g of scandium. Less than 1 gram.

  • John says:

    If you use a short frame and have the seatpost at or close to full hight, unless it is a Thomson or similar they do bend under Human weight and some (Easton EA30) move around like bamboo shoots in a wind storm, which is how I found the Thomson I needed a light stiff post.

  • mario says:

    You are mistaking frame bending with seatpost bending – arguably a common mis-interpretation of what is happening.

  • Dave says:

    FWIW, my Ti layback post definitely flexes. The post flexes enough that it is clearly visible when one pushes firmly on the saddle.

    This looks like a nice post, but the name is misleading. I don’t call my steel CX bike titanium just because it has some titanium in the hubs…

  • oldassraacer says:

    anybody got tips on stopping the creaking noise?

  • pastajet says:

    Put a couple of drops of good lube (like Dumonde or Bioshield) on the top of the bolt letting it soak into the threads.

    To start from the beginning:

    1) use a good anti seize on the bolts, apply liberally
    2) when torquing down the bolts make sure you evenly distribute the force onto the saddle rails (via the yokes), take your time and don’t over force it
    3) add a few drops of lube to the top of the bolts letting it soak in, reapply on occasion

  • Although I like this seat post I think the setback is by far the better post…

    http://fairwheelbikes.com/kcnc-sc-pro-lite-seatpost-p-1226.html

    Not quite as “bling” yet it works wonderfully. The head on it never moves once set and it has two bolts to adjust angle and for/aft separately of each other. It’s around 30 grams heavier but it’s no nonsense and works well.

  • Joon says:

    I’ll have to disagree with Mario. I used to run a RaceFace Deus seatpost on my BottleRocket which had a very short seat tube so the seat post was almost at full length on hill climbs. If I pressed down on the saddle with my full weight (I weight about 150 lb) I could visually see the post slightly bending. This could clearly be felt when on the saddle. I switched to a Thomson and the problem was solved. From then on I only swear by Thomson when it comes to seatposts. Their stems may have issues but the seatposts are the absolute best IMO.

  • Why don’t we start a review on the seatpost reviews?

  • Adam K says:

    I disagree with mario also, my FSA SLK carbon seatpost at full extension on voodoo aizan visibly bends slightly when i lean my weight on it and it is most definitely not the frame

    • Sloan says:

      I have been using the KCNC posts for around 3 years, and never had any iuesss with the saddle sliding nor bent parts, all I have had is the occasional squeak form the bolts. I might suggest sliding the post all the way back, which works well anyway since it’s a zero setback post, that should alleviate any sliding iuesss?Heavy riders would be in the 200-220lb or greater range?

  • Fixation says:

    I’m trying to get some real info on this seatpost. This particular review I have found posted in more than 2 separate sites. Same post on the same bike reviewed by the same person, which seems strange to me. Hasn’t anybody else tried one of these?

    • Auth says:

      I have been using the KCNC posts for around 3 years, and never had any isseus with the saddle sliding nor bent parts, all I have had is the occasional squeak form the bolts. I might suggest sliding the post all the way back, which works well anyway since it’s a zero setback post, that should alleviate any sliding isseus?Heavy riders would be in the 200-220lb or greater range?

  • JA says:

    In all fairness does it not say Scandium up one side? Yes it does say Ti inthe model name but any reasonably smart cyclist could tell in an instant its not being that it has a finish while nearly all ti is raw. I got this after making tha mistake of getting a Hylix carbon. It was fine but my posts have a sliding issue and as it slid it took away a layer of carbon. I knew it was not good but hoped it to be just the aesthetic layer but it cracked nearly all the way around on my next ride. So I wanted a super light metal post. Was told Thompson over and over and while great stuff so many have them, then I found this and read many positive reviews from even heavy guys plus it has deep maching grooves like Thompson to prevent slipping(still a bit worried that it may be a stress riser). As the reviewer has pointed out, the Taiwanese can machine just as good as the Americans and this shows it! I mean where could they possibly have shaved more weight? You can get lighter but you’ll pay dearly for it. I like KCNC.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*