Kona Honzo gets the carbon treatment

Built for speed AND fun

29er All Mountain Trail Cross Country
The carbon version of the Honzo has an aggressive geometry borrowed from its all mountain origins, but can still hold its own on the race track.

The carbon version of the Honzo has an aggressive geometry borrowed from its all mountain origins, but can still hold its own on the race track.

The original Honzo was a steel play bike. It had stays so short, it couldn’t accommodate a FD, and we loved it. It was a bad ass bike with forward thinking geometry that kept a grin spread across your face.

Fast forward to today and that little hardtail is all grown up. In addition to the OG steel version, there’s a now a (significantly lighter) alloy bike, a drool worthy Ti frame, and a plus model. Could it get any better? Well, yes. For 2017, Kona is launching a carbon Honzo.

For 2017, Kona has boosted the reach of all the Honzo platforms by 15mm.

For 2017, Kona has boosted the reach of all the Honzo platforms by 15mm.

When the original Honzo launched back in 2012, the geometry was considered forward thinking, but that aggressive 68 headtube angle and stretched out TT are the new normal for XC race bikes.

This shift in ideology has transformed the Honzo from a fringe bike for the all mountain hardtail enthusiast to the preferred choice for Kona’s endurance athletes. Spencer Paxson has raced the Honzo at several World Cup events and both Barry Wicks and Rhys Verner are riding them at the National level.

Regardless of how fast the bike can be when equipped with ultra light tires, the Honzo is still great fun when pointed downhill. As a result, Kona will be offering decked out in two very different styles.

The CR race differentiates itself from the Trail ready Honzo with its traditional seatpost, lighter wheelset, and faster rolling tires.

The CR race differentiates itself from the Trail ready Honzo with its traditional seatpost, lighter wheelset, and faster rolling tires.

For the XC racer, there’s the Honzo CR Race. It retails for $3,599 USD and comes equipped with Shimano SLX components and a regular post. One unusual spec choice is the fork, which has 34mm stanchions. This burlier fork will feel stiffer and handle better in rough terrain, but also weighs more. That’s a trade-off I’m willing to make, but spandex clad racers may feel differently.

The CR Trail DL offers Kona's premium build kit. It features a Pike fork and X01 components.

The CR Trail DL offers Kona’s premium build kit. It features a Pike fork and X01 components.

If you prefer to rip trail, the CR Trail and CR Trail DL will be love at first sight. Both bikes come equipped with wider rims, grippier tires, and a dropper post.

Like the pricer DL, the CR Trail has a dropper post, 1x drivetrain, and grippy rubber.

Like the pricer DL, the CR Trail has a dropper post, 1x drivetrain, and grippy rubber.

The DL is the premium version and will set you back $4,599. The main difference is that it ships with a Pike and X01 build kit, rather than the Fox 34 Elite and XT/SLX components found on the $3,499 CR Trail.

For more information, visit www.konaworld.com

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

 


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