KTM’s new 2016 mountain bikes come to the States

Well known motorcycle manufacturer goes direct-to-consumer in America for pedal bikes

27.5 29er All Mountain Trail Cross Country Fat Bike
The Lycan LT 271 is the long travel version (160mm) of KTM's popular Lycan model and rolls on 27.5" wheels.

The Lycan LT 271 is the long travel version (160mm) of KTM’s popular Lycan model and rolls on 27.5″ wheels (click to enlarge).

KTM is an Austrian brand that has a long and rich history in the world of motorycles and motorcycle racing. What most US-based cyclists probably don’t know is that KTM has also been producing pedal bikes since the 1960′s. They now have a US-based office located in Miami, Florida. While they are using the ever popular direct-to-consumer business model, they are actively seeking bike “ambassadors” and dealers to help spread the word and stock models.

KTM had a huge booth at the recent Sea Otter Classic and we got a quick run-down on several of their new mountain bikes including the Lycan LT 271, the Lycan 27 Prestige, the Fat Rat and the Scarp 29 Prime. It should also be noted that KTM makes all of their bikes in their own factory and world headquarters in Mattighofen, Austria.

The Lycan LT is equipped with Fox suspension front and rear. The 155mm of rear suspension is rounded up to 160mm as stamped on the bikes linkages.

The Lycan LT is equipped with Fox suspension front and rear. The 155mm of rear suspension is rounded up to 160mm as stamped on the bikes linkages (click to enlarge).

KTM Lycan LT 271

The Lycan is the heart of KTM’s full suspension mountain bike line and they have two different iterations. The Lycan LT is the long travel version that uses a completely different rear suspension design from the rest of the Lycan models. The LT has 155mm of rear travel and is targeted toward the enduro/all mountain rider. Both versions of the Lycan roll on 27.5″ wheels. The LT frame is triple butted alloy and the rear Fox Float DPS EVOL shock is matched with a 160mm Fox 36 Talas up front.

Other spec highlights include Shimano XTR disc brakes, SRAM XX1 1×11 drivetrain and cranks, DT Swiss wheels, Schwalbe Hans Dampf/Rock Razor tires and a KS LEV dropper post. Claimed weight is 29.76 lbs for a size 17″. The KTM Lycan LT is available in only 3 frame sizes (17″, 19″, 21″) and is in stock now and is available direct from the KTM US website for $6,703.

The Lycan 27 Prestige is the top-of-the-line full carbon model and retails for $9,195.

The Lycan 27 Prestige is the top-of-the-line full carbon model and retails for $9,195 (click to enlarge).

KTM Lycan 27 Prestige

The Lycan 27 Prestige is a full carbon model with 125mm of rear travel and is targeted towards the marathon racer or the adventurer. Utilizing a different rear suspension design from the LT, the Lycan 27 Prestige uses what KTM calls their Straight–Line–Link (SLL) system which is designed to be pedaling efficient while having both good small bump compliance and enough travel to take the edge off of bigger hits. There are no pivot points at the rear dropout to provide maximum stiffness. For 2016, KTM has altered their geometry a bit to bring them in line with the longer, lower, slacker mantra which is almost an industry standard now.

Again, KTM uses Fox suspension front and rear with a Float DPS EVOL in the rear and 34 Talas with 150mm of travel up front. The Prestige is the top-of-the-line model and comes kitted with Shimano XTR brakes, SRAM XX1 1×11 drivetrain, DT Swiss 27.5″ wheels, Schwalbe Rocket Ron tires and a KS LEV dropper post. The Lycan 27 Prestige uses the Boost standard 148mm for the rear axle spacing. Claimed weight is 23.8 lbs for a size 17″. The KTM Lycan 27 Prestige is available in only 3 frame sizes (17″, 19″, 21″) and is currently not in stock but interested buyers can place orders to be the first to receive when shipping start. Price for this full carbon model is $9,195.

The Fat Rat comes with a RockShox Bluto for with 120mm of travel, a SRAM X9 2x10 drivetrain, Sun Ringle Mulefut wheels and a price of $2,900.

The Fat Rat comes with a RockShox Bluto for with 150mm of travel, a SRAM X9 2×10 drivetrain, Sun Ringle Mulefut wheels and a price of $2,900 (click to enlarge).

KTM Fat Rat

The Fat Rat is an alloy framed hardtail fat bike that is available in two different versions. Shown here, the Fat Rat comes with a RockShox Bluto suspension fork with 150mm of travel. The aluminum frame has nice internal cable routing and a solid, no nonsense color scheme.

The rest of the parts kit includes Sun Ringle Mulefut fat bike 26″ wheels shod with Schwalbe Jumbo Jim tires. Brakes are Shimano Deore hydraulic disc, the drivetrain is SRAM X9 2×10. Claimed weight is 31.5 lbs for a size 17″. The KTM Fat Rat is currently in stock and available online for $2,900. If you are on a tight budget, KTM also offers the Fat Flea fat bike that comes with a rigid fork and a price of $2,255.

The Scarp is KTM's full suspension 29er line that features 90mm of rear travel mated with 100mm of travel up front.

The Scarp is KTM’s full suspension 29er line that features 90mm of rear travel mated with 100mm of travel up front (click to enlarge).

KTM Scarp 29 Prime RS1

The KTM Scarp 29 Prime is a full carbon fiber 29er with 90mm of rear travel that is targeted towards the cross-country racer set. With a RockShox Monarch XX-C2 shock in the rear and a RockShox RS-1 upside down fork with 100mm of travel up front, the ride is efficient and capable. There is also a remote front fork lock-out for absolute climbing power.

The stout carbon front triangle is paired with a Boost equipped carbon rear swingarm for stiffness. Component highlights start with the Shimano XTR shifters and rear derailleur, Shimano XT front derailleur, cassette, cranks and brakes. DT Swiss wheels roll on Schwalbe Rocket Ron tires. Claimed weight is 23.8 lbs for a size 17″. The KTM Scarp 29 Prime RS1 is currently in stock and available online for $7,249. There are several other iterations of the Scarp available including a higher priced Di2 version and also more affordable alloy framed models.

For more information or to purchase direct from KTM’s US website, visit ktmbikeindustries.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Gregg Kato

Gregg Kato studied journalism and broadcasting in college while working many different jobs including deejaying, driving a forklift and building web sites (not all at the same time). Kato enjoys riding local Santa Cruz trails. Besides being an avid mountain biker, he is also a motorcycle fanatic. Two wheels, one Passion.


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  • stiingya says:

    That was KTM’s “popular” Lycan model…? “popular” with all the Americans out riding them I suppose…? All what SEVEN of them…? :) :) :) JK

  • bryan says:

    Made in their own factory, not in china? That right there is a breath of fresh air.

    • MK says:

      “Made” = What exactly?
      Fabricated? Assembled?
      A lot of their designs look “open mold-ish” in terms of tech.

      My guess would be that the bikes are assembled in their own plant, however I would be willing to bet that some if not all frame fabrication is subcontracted from suppliers (especially carbon).

  • Melissa Thomas says:

    On the KTM website it says the Lycan 271 is 12.9 Kg and that is more like 28.5 lb? Has the bike changed a little or am I still bad at math or is the website weight wrong?

  • Chase Capicotti says:

    Just ordered my 2016 Lycan 272 22s, bike looks awesome, we’ll see how it rides!!!

  • JK says:

    So you pay full price for a 2005 geometry and single pivot suspension design, narrow rims, limited dropper post range, with no LBS support? Good luck KTM.

  • RM says:

    performance now carries them…if you have one by you

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