Magura Marta SL Magnesium Review

Brakes Pro Reviews


Installation

Installing the Mags on the handlebars was sort of a pain, since they don’t use a split clamp, so it necessitates taking off the grips and the shifters. Trigger finger shifters can be installed on either side of the brakes (dual dock), but I use twist grips, so they were attached in the usual inboard manner.

The new bleeding system called “Easy Bleed Technology” or EBT has drastically changed for the better, which is really nice since Magura Marta’s are notorious for needing regular bleeding, although after my initial installation, I haven’t required one. The new port on top of the lever reservoir makes bleeding a much easier task.

Basic bleed instructions: tilt the upper reservoir slightly down from level, unscrew the top port bolt, insert a syringe, unscrew the caliper bolt, insert a second brake fluid filled syringe into caliper port, and push the brake fluid using that bottom syringe into the top syringe, then pull and push the fluid between the syringe’s until bubbles are gone.

The new bleed port made doing a bleed almost pleasant, notice I said almost because any system is a bit of a chore, but this new system is a highly engineered marvel in comparison to the old method. Bleeding brakes is like a poke in the eye!

When I shortened the units to fit my bike, I followed the directions perfectly for the rear brake, and I cut the rear line and was I able to connect it back up without doing anything else. Just make sure that you keep the cut line elevated, and don’t try and make any drastic changes to things as you progress. Somehow I got some air into the brakes (I made changes as I went) when I did the front line, and I had to bleed it, so I got a first hand experience with the newer method, and it was enjoyable and easier for brake bleeding. Again simple is as simple does!

Technical Features

The redesigned reservoir body has many features, including the EBT bleeding system, a new pivot system for the carbon lever, and of course it is made from forged magnesium, except for the composite reservoir cap. It uses an open hydraulic disc brake system with completely integrated reservoir, and is filled with Magura’s Royal Blood mineral oil brake fluid. The carbon lever now uses stitched carbon fiber, for greater stiffness.

The redesigned caliper is one piece monoblock aluminum for maximum stiffness, and uses injected molded composite pistons for less heat transfer to the brake fluid. The dual pistons are also magnetized so that no clips are required to hold the pads in place. They come with their 6.1 Performance Series pad (maximum power), but you can also get their 6.2 Endurance version (longevity). The rotors which are sold separately, come in the ubiquitous 6 bolt IS in 160, 180, and 203mm sizes, in their default SL Wavy (lightweight), the Drilled SL (mud and cooling holes) or the Ventidisk (All Mountain). The calipers are post mount, but Magura has an entire slew of adapters to fit most any bike or fork.

Instead of the usual powder coating, the caliper and reservoir bodies are painted with a nice white and red color.

Measured Specs:
front brake uncut (64 inch hose) – 219.3 grams
160 rotors – 111.2 grams
total w/ 160′s – 330.5 grams

rear brake uncut (64 inch hose) – 218.4 grams
160 rotor – 111.0 grams
total w/ 160′s – 329.4 grams

Next » Impressions

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About the author: Brian Mullin

Brian has been part of the Mtbr team since 2007, where he has become an integral member of the review and test staff, specializing in technical articles. He likes to push the limits in all the sports he obsesses in, whether it's mountain biking, whitewater kayaking, extreme skiing, or sport climbing. He takes those same strengths and a good dose of insanity to his reviewing and writing on mountain biking products, creating technical, in-depth and hyperbolic articles. Whenever he's not on the bike, he might be found watching MotoGP racing, otherwise look for him out on extremely technical singletrack.


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