Marin Pine Mountain 1 and new 141x9mm boost QR standard

Essesntially quick release version of boost hub spacing that lowers cost

27.5 Cross Country Plus
The Pine Mountain line of hardtails combine aggressive trail geometry and mid fat tires in an affordable package.

The Pine Mountain line of hardtails combine aggressive trail geometry and mid-fat tires in an affordable package (click to enlarge).

For their 30th anniversary, Marin launched the Pine Mountain 2 hardtail, a plus sized model that paid homage to the brand’s past, but incorporated modern amenities. That mix proved to be so popular that Marin has attempted to distill the same formula into more affordable price points.

What elevates this build from similarly priced offerings from competitors is the attention to detail, like the token red components and grizzly bear accents throughout.

What elevates this build is the attention to detail, like the token red components and grizzly bear accents throughout (click to enlarge).

Their new Pine Mountain 1 is tubeless ready 27.5+ CroMo hardtail that blends an aggressive trail geometry with a wide range 1×11 drivetrain, smartly spec’d value oriented components, and front suspension for $1299.

Last year the Pine Mountain was available in two trims. The suspension equipped Pine Mountain 2 and fully rigid Pine Mountain 1. For MY2017, they’ve introduced a third option that sits right in the middle.

Last year, the Pine Mountain was available in two trims. The suspension equipped Pine Mountain 2 and fully rigid Pine Mountain 1. Now, they’ve introduced a third option that sits in the middle (click to enlarge).

For model year 2017, this bike will sit between the $2749 Pine Mountain 2, which uses Columbus Thron tubing, and the sub one thousand dollar full rigid Pine Mountain. For a more in depth overview of those models, please check out our Interbike coverage here.

Build it how you like it. The Pine Mountain line has a number of options for mounting bags, a dropper, you name it.

Build it how you like it. The Pine Mountain line has a number of options for mounting bags, a dropper, and more (click to enlarge).

Aside from the obvious value and clean lines of the new Pine Mountain 1, what took me by surprise was Marin’s use of the new 141x9mm hub standard. This was the first time I’d ever heard of this “standard.” For the complete rundown on the how and why, Mtbr reached out to Marin mountain bike product manager Mathew Cipes to learn more.

While I hate new standards as much as the next rider, Cipes has some solid reasons why the this new 141x9mm rear end will improve the performance of new entry level and intermediate bikes in the near future.

Continue to page 2 for our interview with Marin mountain bike product manager Mathew Cipes »

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  • duder says:

    Realistically, the boost thru axle vs QR should not cause a dramatic price increase (or increase at all). This is a step back…for no reason. Cant imagine anyone will be jumping on Boost QR, and is a big reason to skip what could be an otherwise great entry bike.

  • will says:

    qr skewer is cheaper than a Maxle or comparable product. Dropout is probably also cheaper to manufacture.

  • stiingya says:

    I was going to agree completely with you. Even at 1400 bucks, it seems silly to not just do a thru axle instead of develop something “new”. BUT, my guess is that they are looking down the line when BOOST is the main hub spacing standard. And at that point, for low end use QR’s will probably still dominate. So likely at this point this bike was mostly to bring the technology/standard to market?

    Also, target market for this bike is probably mostly “first and only” mountain bikers? (still I’d pay the extra 200 and get a Fuse Comp in a heartbeat!)

    For established riders a boost QR seems like a total “miss”. I want my boost PLUS hardtail to be able swap over my already boosted wheels/2.4 tires from my Bronson to use the hardtail at the pump track/jump park. AND I want to buy some 29er wheels for XC/bike path/urban use.

    Initially BOOST creates incompatibility. But in the long run it creates some interesting options!

    COURSE, the geo on these boosted Marin hardtails kills them for me anyway. LOVE the look of the special anniversary model they did last year. But they should have just gone for the LOOK and NOT the geometry!!! :)

  • duder says:

    Will, I would imagine at wholesale OEM pricing there is minimal savings using a skewer, and what makes the dropout manufacturing any different? Lets say it costs an extra 10-20 bucks a bike…I think the boosted sales (see what i did there) would more than make up for it.

  • MJ says:

    You are underestimating the cost issue. A thru axle frame has to be perfectly aligned which requires more steps with more precise jigs, welding, etc. Dropouts tolerate a lot more variance. See this thread for what can happen when tolerances on a thru axle are off: http://forums.mtbr.com/marin/cant-remove-rear-wheel-2013-xm-7-a-937510.html
    Perhaps not coincidentally Marin had moved from a rear QR to Thru axle on that model for that production year.

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