OneUp goes wider with new 10-50t 11-speed 1x system

Modular upgrades for Shimano MTB cassettes provides 500% gear range

Components News
OneUp is calling the new Shark system the widest range 11-speed 1x system ever thanks to a whopping 500% gear range.

OneUp is calling the new Shark system the widest range 11-speed 1x system ever thanks to a whopping 500% gear range (click to enlarge).

With SRAM’s recent announcement that the front derailleur is dead in the world of mountain biking, it seems only appropriate to follow-up with news of yet a wider option 1x option. Meet the new OneUp Components Shark 10-50t set-up, which it’s calling the widest range 11-speed 1x system ever thanks to a whopping 500% gear range.

The OneUp Shark is a set of modular upgrades for Shimano 11-speed mountain bike cassettes that extends the range of a stock 11-42t cassette by nearly a third with the addition of a 50t sprocket and cage kit, a 10t cluster, or both. The idea is that you can build the ideal cassette for your trails and abilities. The converted 11-50t cassette is the widest range available that uses a standard freehub body, says OneUp.

Read about Shimano’s new 11-46 cassette.

Cassette progression with 50t installed is 11,13,15,18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 37, 42, and 50.

Cassette progression with 50t installed is 11,13,15,18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 37, 42, and 50 (click to enlarge).

The Shark 50t sprocket and cage kit has an MSRP of $125. Here’s a rundown of key metrics and features of the new set-up:

  • Cassette progression with 50t: 11,13,15,18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 37, 42, 50
  • Sprocket material: 7075-T6 aluminum (50t), nickel plated hardened steel (18t)
  • Compatibility: XT M8000 11-42t cassettes
  • Compatibility for Shimano 11-40: Use the OneUp 45t sprocket
  • Freehub requirement: Standard freehub
  • Colors: Grey or green
  • Shark cage Tech specs:
 Pulley offset 50% more than stock
  • Compatibility: Shimano Shadow+ 11-speed rear derailleur
  • Colors: Grey or grey/green

OneUp 10-50t Set-up

The new Shark 10-12t cluster and OneUp mini-driver adds 10% of range on an 11-speed Shimano mountain cassette.

The new Shark 10-12t cluster and OneUp mini-driver adds 10% of range on an 11-speed Shimano mountain cassette (click to enlarge).

At the other end of the spectrum, if you are looking to add more top end gearing, OneUp is offering its new Shark 10-12t cluster and OneUp mini-driver. This adds 10% of range on an 11-speed Shimano mountain cassette. OneUp collaborated with Hope Technology to develop this non-proprietary, freehub body standard that accepts a 10t sprocket.

This shortened version of a standard freehub is available for Hope, Stan’s and DT Swiss hubs with more coming soon, says OneUp. Because the mini-driver open standard is not guarded by patents, production of inexpensive 10t equipped cassettes is possible.

The 10-12t cluster and mini-driver is compatible with Shimano 11-speed 11-40 and 11-42, and OneUp’d Shimano 11-45, 11-50.

The 10-12t cluster and mini-driver is compatible with Shimano 11-speed 11-40 and 11-42, and OneUp’d Shimano 11-45, 11-50 (click to enlarge).

MSRP for the nickel plated cluster with green lockring
 is $45. The OneUp DT star ratchet compatible mini-driver is $40. Here’s a rundown of key metrics and features:

  • 10t cluster kit contains: 10-12 cluster, 14t and 15t
  • Cassette progression (11-40 Shimano converted to 10-40): 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21, 24, 27, 31, 35, 40
  • Cassette progression (11-42 Shimano converted to 10-42): 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21, 24, 28, 32, 37, 42
  • Compatibility: Shimano 11-speed 11-40, 11-42; OneUp’d Shimano 11-45, 11-50
  • Freehub requirement: OneUp mini-driver (or compatible)
  • Mini-driver length: 4.5mm shorter than a standard freehub

For more info visit www.oneupcomponents.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures all over the globe. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and is the author of the cycling guide book "75 Classic Rides: Colorado." When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying time with his wife Lisa and daughter Cora.


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  • Shark says:

    Good job on picking the name!

  • Cecil says:

    Andrew,
    Check out this great gear calculator: http://www.gear-calculator.com/

  • Fleas says:

    So an 11-36 8-speed should be a no-brainer, right?

    50T just looks ridiculous to me.

  • Kenneth says:

    This is getting out of hand. At some point you just need to get into better shape or run a 2X system. There is nothing wrong with running a 2X system and Shimano makes a great front front derailleur

  • advcyclist says:

    How fitting… they named it the Shark just in time for the megatooth cassette craze to jump the shark. “Isn’t it Ironic; don’t ya think?” Can we return to normalcy now?

  • EddyKilowatt says:

    Honest question: what’s the shift quality actually like on these mega cassettes?

    The derailleur has to handle 40T of chain length variation, AND keep the chain closely coupled to cogs with a 5:1 diameter variation… my “no free lunch” instincts are saying that there must be some shift snappiness and reliability getting traded away in exchange for the big shift range here.

  • bike mike says:

    checkout the picture where the chain is on the big cog. that’s a long cage which is super extended down towards the ground and precariously close to the spokes.

    so what you say?

    I can see a small stick finding its way into the tension pulley, jamming it while your powering uphill with all your might. I then see the chain continuing around the cassette, pulling the long cage/lever backwards and in towards the wheel!

    crunch, new derailleur time!

  • Dan Powers says:

    Still not getting the granny gear I get with a 22/36 combo on the 2×10. For those of us middle aged and riding in the mountains, the 2×10 still seems the best solution.

  • al kumaus says:

    The less is more concept pertains here. Less parts, higher cost, actually more shifting problems, greater room for rear drl. damage with bogie wheel hanger being slightly longer, and thinner 11 spd. chain strength. I myself have been running 3×9 setup for a long time, keep it adjusted, wide gear range, price is perfect, and the Shimano parts can take a beating. I ride in Michigan, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Montana. See no need to be put into buying for the sake of what the RACERS think is better. The 2x setup is also a great setup, except for the cost of some parts. I myself like all the gear options, not walking up a mountain when I can pedal. And I do not care if the next guy with a 1x can walk faster than I can ride up the mountain, let him walk for a couple hundred yards with stiff sole riding shoes and he will agree riding is better.

    • bike mike says:

      great points. I like the 3×10 for its versatility, I can switch wheels and ride on the road.

      I don’t believe it is the RACERs pushing this stuff. I don’t think they spend that much time thinking about it. They get new stuff to try and spend most of their time training.

      I believe it is the 2 component makers SRAM Shimano coming up with new ideas, forcing the racers to ride it, marketing it and then the consumer rush to buy more new hot stuff.

      You buy a new bike, spend a lot of money and as soon as you walk out the door, you can’t get anywhere near what you paid for it.

      Think of what you do with your old bikes? I give mine to friends relatives.

      my 2011 Epic with 26″ wheels is obsolete! I happen to like 26″ wheels but won’t be able to find a new bike with 26″ wheels.

      Now they’re pushing the 1×11 and soon their won’t be a choice. Why? because Sram Shimano have this “King of Technology” battle going on. One comes up with something, they think is hot, and the other copies and tries to up…

      As prices spiral up, we the lovers of MTBing are the ones feeling the squeeze.

  • Tom says:

    This negates one of the advantages of a 1x system which is using a short or medium cage derailleur.

  • Chris says:

    Based on my experience using the One Up conversion on my Giant 29er for a set-up of 34 front and 11-40 rear, it is my belief that 10-46 would probably be all I would ever need. I do miss a bit of the high end, but I almost never use the 40 tooth cog. A 10-46 would probably be perfect. There is no perfect set-up for everybody, but suffice to say if I know people who raced single speed mtb competitively against geared riders, any version of 1X works as long as you train with it and are in shape.

  • Oliver says:

    If you need a 46 or 50t rear cog, you might want to take up an easier sport like bowling.

  • Ben Dhover says:

    What is the total cassette weight?

  • Mike says:

    FD dead? You can keep your marketing Sram.

    I recently bought a 3×10, yes, 3×10 and it works great. I *never* have any problems whatsoever with front shifting with XTR stuff. That group is so perfect. My fat bike has Sram X9 on it and the front shifting is often a problem. I guess it’s easier to say the FD is dead than to try to perfect it.

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