Onza Canis tire now offered in 2.85 plus size

Sidewall color options include black or light beige

27.5 Plus Tires
Behold the steep and loose soil! The enormous contact patch glues you to the ground! Photo by © Michael Riehle / DT Swiss AG

This new tire’s enormous contact patch glues you to the ground. (click to enlarge) Photo by Michael Riehle / DT Swiss AG

The Onza Canis tire could already be found as OEM spec on some BMC bikes, and is known for its low rolling resistance and great grip on dry and loose surfaces. Since the trend nowadays is that tires are getting wider, Onza has joined the club and developed the new Canis 27.5×2.85”. The knobs and the distance between them are roughly the same as on the original tire. Of course, this means that on the larger surface there are more of them. The center knobs form a relatively smooth surface and the tire has a more round than square profile. The side knobs follow this roundness and are not very aggressive.

Sidewall color options include black or light beige. The rubber is dual compound (65a/55a) with the softer rubber on the sides and the harder in the middle of the tire. With the bigger volume, Onza puts the tire in the all mountain category. The tires are tubeless ready, 120 tpi, and have a claimed weight of 840g per tire.

With the 2.85” width you should be able to squeeze the new Canis tire into a modern 29er (although Boost will surely help). Photo by © Jeroen Tiggelman

With the 2.85” width you should be able to squeeze the new Canis tire onto a modern 29er (although Boost will surely help). (click to enlarge) Photo by Jeroen Tiggelman

First Impression

Because of the positioning of the center knobs the rolling resistance stays on the lower side. Mounted on a 30mm wide rim at a recommended pressure of 17 psi the contact patch is huge, offering great traction while braking or accelerating. Steep climbs on loose surfaces are limited only by the power of your legs.

However, since the side knobs aren’t very aggressive, the lateral grip may diminish on muddy or off chamber trails. Sharp rocks were no problem, and the steering, despite the wider size, was precise.

A better view on the round contact patch that interacts very well with dry and loose surfaces. Photo by © Jeroen Tiggelman

A better view of the round contact patch that interacts very well with dry and loose surfaces (click to enlarge). Photo by Jeroen Tiggelman

For more information visit onza-tires.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

About the author: Jeroen Tiggelman

Jeroen is a contributor based in Belgium. He is expert in the field of photography and a fan of local beer.


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  • Wuffles says:

    30 mm wide rim @17 psi.

    I run regular tires on my XC bike at that. And guess what, they weigh 200 grams less, and have actual cornering nobs!

    But if you want to spend more money to get something objectively worse, go ahead!

    • dan says:

      if your xc tires weigh 200g less, they dont have cornering knobs lol. and have you ever rode a plus tire?

    • JohnnyVV says:

      You do realize rider weight matters here, right? Contact patch will be bigger at a given PSI for a heavier rider. I run 17 psi on 2.35s @ 140lbs. A heavier rider would need more pressure, and clearly I’d go even lower on 2.8s. Besides…what PSI is recommended on your XC tires? Surely much more than 17, but almost everyone runs below the manufacturer recommendation. Why then should we suddenly care what’s recommended here? Maybe 17 PSI just happens to be the golden ticket for the author.

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