Review: Evoc Bike Travel Bag

Gear Pro Reviews

I travel all over the US and now the world with my bike! I’ve tried all different types of travel cases and they each offer their pros and cons. Hard cases offer the most protection, but they are heavy, meaning that the person’s eyes at the airline counter will light up with giant dollar signs like a cartoon character when they see you coming. Most airlines strictly enforce the 50lb weight limit when it comes to traveling with a bike. Most hard cases with a bike inside and nothing else exceed the 50lb limit. They can also be hard to pack. Soft cases weigh less, but most do not offer ample protection. Cardboard boxes are the lightest, but have to be carried and can tear.

Last year, I decided to seek out the best bike case.

I was looking for a case:

  • That was lightweight so I could pack other things along with the bike and still not be over weight
  • Offered protection
  • Was easy to pack
  • That had wheels

I found my dream case – the $450 Evoc. I can pack my bike in 15 min or less. It weighs 16.3 lbs and has padding and PVC in the right places to protect my bike.

Inside the case, it organizes the packing arrangment for you with buckles and Velcro.

It has its own wheel compartments. It has a couple small pockets for tools, pedals, and skewers.

…and I can pack it full with clothing, shoes, and sports nutrition without it being overweight.

I got a new one this year because they now make one that fits 29er wheels without having to deflate them (which can cause them to unseed and leak Stan’s everywhere!)

Disassembly requirements:

  • Pedals off
  • Take the seatpost out
  • Remove stem and handlebar as one piece and strap it on the top tube pad
  • Pull derailleur hanger off
  • Wheels off, rotors off
  • Place frame into bag and strap in the fork, frame, and rear chain stays
  • Pack wheels and tools
  • Add extra stuff
  • Deal with people asking you every five seconds what’s in your case!

Price: $450.
For more information visit www.evocusa.com.

Review: Evoc Bike Travel Bag Gallery
1
of


(Visited 12,116 times, 1 visits today)
About the author: Sonya Looney

Sonya Looney is a world class ultra endurance mountain bike racer. She has competed in the hardest international stage races in the world, picking up several wins. She has three USA 24 Hour National Champion jerseys in her closet, as well as a Marathon World Championship USA team kit hiding in there as well. Her love is for big mountain adventures which helps her excel at her favorite race distance - 100 milers. Sonya's positive energy and love for life would never lead you to guess she suffers in her races and always is laughing with a grin on her face. She also prides herself in her taste for microbrews, red wine, and has a quick witted sense of humor.


Related Articles

NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Aleks says:

    How big a bike will this case fit? Like my xxl Santa Cruz . . .

    • ian says:

      we have 3 of them,, 2 old ones ( 4 years old) and a new one purchased about 2 months back, they will take anything up to a downhillbike, with 200mm dual crown fork.
      they make travelling with bikes a real pleasure, they are just a joy to use, the newer ones is slightly more improved on the older ones, my only 2 complaints would be, the price, at 300 quid they aint cheap, and there’s no way these cost that much to make, and the weight, at 8kg they pretty heavy, specially if your putting a dh or freeride bike helmets and pads into it, you’ll be pretty close to that airline weight limit,

  • Ben says:

    Very nice case!
    I assume you still end up paying the airline fee for a bicycle correct? Being so much lighter than a hard case I would hope you might get by here and there. ;)

  • YW-Slayer says:

    I’ve got this, although mine may be the slightly older one where I suppose the 29″ wheels have to be deflated. I don’t know as I’ve only ever travelled with my 17.5″ 26″ Remedy in it. I’ve flown from HK to Bali and HK to Lijiang, China (and back of course) with it and it’s a great case. I would also point out that you can put random stuff below the frame (usually things which will not overload the bag e.g. spare tubes, water bottles, dirty clothes, armour, helmet, backpack). The interior side pockets are more than large enough for putting basic tools, SPDs, and a pedal wrench in, and maybe even some maps. Plus even a relative mechanical n00b like me can pack and unpack the bike within 15 minutes (I am not a mechanical genius and generally have difficulty doing anything mechanical on my bike other than the steps necessary for packing/unpacking it into this bag).

    You’ll still generally be overweight, but if you are travelling with at least 1 other person who doesn’t bike, I find that you can usually use their leftover luggage allowance.

  • Myles O'Stooley says:

    Please explain how this bike bag protects your wheels and frame from airport luggage handlers? I do not see any sort of foam or thick padding lining the sides of the bag like you would see on a surfboard bag. Instead, it looks more like a glorified tarp with an expensive bike inside..and at 450 bucks..

    • YW-Slayer says:

      I’m not a physicist or an engineer, nor have I stress-tested and examined it. I’m just someone who’s bought it and has successfully used it on 2 trips. The last trip I took with this bag was in May, so my recollection may therefore be slightly hazy.

      One of the wheels (mostly, but not fully, deflated) goes on each side. They provide protection for the rear of the triangle. The seat (which I usually leave in) protects it from the top, and the front is protected by padding, of which there is a fair amount inside. It is NOT simply a “glorified tarp” costugin US$450 as you have quite wrongly assumed.

      In my limited experience, the bag has worked well for me so far, although I’ve only seen it being wheeled around and/or being rested on its bottom/side. While I’m sure a baggage handler could the damage stuff inside if they tossed it around (which is difficult), and if they wanted or tried to, that’s surely the case with almost everything. Having said that, I am very sure that if I had packed my Remedy in a glorified tarp (costing US$450 or some other amount) I would not have been able to ride in Bali or in Lijiang.

      BTW, my LBS – which I bought this from (I was one of the first to buy this from them) – also rents them out to people (along with another brand of hard bike bag that they sell if people prefer that).

      But hey, no skin off my nose if you don’t want to buy the bag. I just think it’s a good product and I’m providing feedback on my experience with it, which has been good for me so far.

  • YW-Slayer says:

    I’m not a physicist or an engineer, nor have I stress-tested and examined it. I’m just someone who’s bought it and has successfully used it on 2 trips. The last trip I took with this bag was in May, so my recollection may therefore be slightly hazy.

    One of the wheels (mostly, but not fully, deflated) goes on each side. They provide protection for the rear of the triangle. The seat (which I usually leave in) protects it from the top, and the front is protected by padding, of which there is a fair amount inside. It is NOT simply a “glorified tarp” costugin US$450 as you have quite wrongly assumed.

    In my limited experience, the bag has worked well for me so far, although I’ve only seen it being wheeled around and/or being rested on its bottom/side. While I’m sure a baggage handler could the damage stuff inside if they tossed it around (which is difficult), and if they wanted or tried to, that’s surely the case with almost everything. Having said that, I am very sure that if I had packed my Remedy in a glorified tarp (costing US$450 or some other amount) I would not have been able to ride in Bali or in Lijiang.

    BTW, my LBS – which I bought this from (I was one of the first to buy this from them) – also rents them out to people (along with another brand of hard bike bag that they sell if people prefer that).

    But hey, no skin off my nose if you don’t want to buy the bag. I just think it’s a good product and I’m providing feedback on my experience with it, which has been good for me so far.

  • Thomas says:

    Evoc looks good and strong. Do you think some more basic bags could do the job for trip by planes ? I’m thinking about the CRC bag i have seen here : http://www.mtb-check.com/fr/test-du-sac-de-transport-de-velo-chainreactioncycles/

  • Harry says:

    The article mentions having to remove the rotors; “rotors off”.
    The disc brake rotors? Really?
    I could deal with removing the derailleur and the stem, but my disc rotors are torqued on pretty well. I hate touching/messing with them under the best circumstances.
    Is this really necessary?

  • MannyR says:

    I’ve owned and used mine for almost 4 years now and travelled with it a dozen times. All I have to do is;
    1.lower the seatpost (medium size bike),
    2. remove wheelset and deflate halfway
    3. remove pedals, stem/handlebar assembly (returning spacers and headset cap back into the steertube)
    4. Strap the bike inside the bag as shown above.
    5. Put the skewers, pedals, tools, pumps, spares into inside pocket then zip-close the main compartment.
    6. put the wheels into the wheel pockets and zip close it. And you’re all set.

    I never remove disk rotors since it is well protected but if you use a 180/203 disk, it is always advisable to do so as you cannot control rough handlers at the plane cargo areas.
    I’m planning to get another one though since the newer version now fits 29′ers.

    Hope this help.

  • Gamalier Lozada says:

    Have anybody tried this bag in a Delta flight? Just curious how much they charge for it for one of their frequent travel members.

  • Brian Nystrom says:

    While the weight limit for luggage is 50 pounds, the weight limit for a bike case is 100 pounds. Given that, we’d rather have a little more weight and better protection from a hard case. We tried separate single cases from a couple of companies, but settled on the Triall3sports double case. With 2 full-suspension MTBs, we need to carry the front wheels in a separate box (not enough room in the case), but it travels free as luggage (on Southwest or Jet Blue). Carrying 2 complete road or cross bikes (and a bunch of other gear) in the case is no problem and a pair of hardtails wouldn’t be out of the question.

  • Michael Hanslip says:

    My Evoc bag replaced my TriAll3 hard case 2 years ago. The hard case protected road bikes on many trips around the world (case got damaged, bike never did) but I always found it difficult to squeeze a MTB inside. Since it locates the bike via the front QR it won’t work with my through-axle forks either.
    The Evoc will fit either my XL Santa Cruz V10 or my XL Yeti SB66 so it should take just about any other really big MTB. Having said that, it is a squeeze. If the wheelbase of the V10 was even 1 mm longer it might not go in there. I’ve packed several size S DH bikes in an Evoc bag and it is MUCH easier. You’ll also have some issues trying to get the bars in there if they are wide (75 cm just fit in the loops meant to hold bars – 80 cm probably would not and therefore be less restrained).
    You aren’t meant to have to remove the rear derailleur, but both the SC and the Yeti won’t go in without doing so (again, a small SB66 and several small DH bikes – no problem).
    My V10 is about 17kg ready to ride. In the bag with knee pads, full-face helmet, shoes and a set of allen keys it tips the scales at 31.9 kg – just squeaking under the 32 kg limit for international travel. My Yeti is more like 12 kg and I don’t ride it with the full-face helmet – so at check-in it was 6 kg lighter.

    During my second flight with it, one of the PVC pipes that protect the brake rotors got cracked. A quick trip to the hardware store fixed that up. After 8 flights it is getting a bit beaten up around the edges – scuffs and minor tears.

    Last note, while it will take an Ikon 29″x2.2″ tyre, I doubt it would take a Hans Dampf 29″x2.35″ tyre fully inflated. So to say it will hold a 29er tyre is not a universal truth. It does fit 26″x2.5″ DH tyres fully inflated (barely).

    I think it is a good product and after around 40 trans-ocean flights amongst my family and friends there are no incidents of bike damage to report – none.

  • Bocian says:

    I am surprised to read all the positive comments, I very much regret my purchase of this bag, granted it has a lot of space and can take a full suspension 29er without much bike stripping but the soft bag is a bad idea for an airplane travel. My expensive enve wheel was damaged during the air travel basically with no way of me proving that it was caused by airline – therefore no reimbursement. Imagine 10 other heavy bags stored on your bag in the plane cargo compartment, your bike squashed, the bag gives absolutely no protection against this kind of damage because it is a soft bag. For the future for me the alan bike box or the other similar (forgot the name) hard case is the way to go for plane trips because my bike is too valuable for me

  • charlie says:

    Not wanting to buy more than one travel case. Will my road bike also fit in this case? I am 6’6″ tall and my frame is a 64 cm. What is max. ht. from top of steer tube to bottom of fork?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*