Review: Lupine Wilma 7

Brightness, run time, weight all justifies the $595 price

Lights Lights Shootout

2015 Lights Shootout

Lupine Wilma 7 System

The Lupine Wilma 7 has not changed much in the last year, but it still remains our favorite high end light. It produces a staggering 2770 measured Lumens in a small package and it delivers it in a nice, big, even beam pattern.

Total system weight is 370 grams and run time is 1:45 hours on high. But in reality, running this on half power is way more than enough light at 1400 Lumens and that delivers run time of 3:20. A plethora of battery options are available if the user has other needs. These Smartcore batteries by Lupine have a fuel gauge indicator and they charge up in about two hours.

Such versatility allows the light to be run on the bars or on the helmet. It can run by itself, with a Piko 4 on the helmet or with a Betty R 14 on the bar.

Beam Pattern Photo

We photographed the lights in the same location setting with the same camera settings. The photos were taken in the back yard that is approximately 25 yards long. These photos feature many objects and a distinct background to analyze detail and beam pattern. Compare all Beam Patterns here »

Lupine Wilma 7 Backyard Beam Pattern

Integrating Sphere Measured Lumens

This light measured 2770 Lumens in an integrating sphere. Claimed Lumens by the manufacturer is 2800 Lumens. The Lumen-hour graph below shows how the light performs over the first three minutes of its battery cycle. Compare all Lumen Tests here »

Lupine Wilma 7 Lumen Chart

Strengths
  • Impressive 26 degree, even beam pattern
  • Honest rating at 2800 Lumens
  • The best Lumens per gram rating and still an excellent value at Lumens per dollar
  • Like all Lupine lights, it will step down quickly when it gets hot, but it will ramp back up quickly when there is sufficient airflow
  • 3:20 hours run time at 1400 Lumens or 1:45 hours at 2800
  • Excellent charger and smart battery with indicator
  • Lupine quality and reputation. In 10 years, you can still be using this light
  • Can be used with impressive array of Lupine batteries
Weaknesses
  • It’s still $595
  • Can get hot when stationary and will step down in brightness as the light head is small
  • With this much output, beam could be wider
Specifications
  • Price: $595
  • Claimed Lumens: 2800 Lumens
  • Measured Lumens: 2770 Lumens
  • Lumens per $: 4.66 Lumens
  • Lumens per gram: 7.69 Lumens
  • Time on High: 1:45 Hours
  • Charge Time: 2:00 Hours
  • Mounted Weight: 360 grams
  • Category: High End
Overall Rating

When it comes to high-end lights, this is the king of power, weight and price.

5 Flamin' Chili Peppers 5 out of 5 Flamin’ Chili Peppers

For more information visit www.lupine.de.

This article is part of Mtbr and RoadBikeReview’s 2015 Lights Shootout. To see all the bike lights tested CLICK HERE.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

About the author: Francis Cebedo

The founder of mtbr and roadbikereview, Francis Cebedo believes that every cyclist has a lot to teach and a lot to learn. "Our websites are communal hubs for sharing cycling experiences, trading adventure stories, and passing along product information and opinions." Francis' favorite bike is the last bike he rode, whether it's a dirt jumper, singlespeed, trail bike, lugged commuter or ultralight carbon road steed. Indeed, Francis loves cycling in all its forms and is happiest when infecting others with that same passion. Francis also believes that IPA will save America.


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  • DrDon says:

    I’m running this light with a Piko on the helmet. Very nice. My Seca 700 was becoming dated, but it produces a better beam pattern. A Seca 2000 on the bars and a Trail LED DS would be an cool combination, but the Lupines are more versatile and the quality high. Evening laps around the metro park with the Piko on my road bike bar. Night hikes with the Piko or the Wilma on a head mount. I use the larger batteries because I use a pack and I don’t care about weight and I do like the brightness. Are they worth it? Well, the L&M lamp produces such a good beam pattern with lower lumens and you can find the older model on sale, so I would say no, unless you want the smallest and the lightest package with jewel like refinement.

  • BobS says:

    You can get them from Gretna Bikes (google it, but I think it’s http://www.gretnabikes.com). Dan and the others there are great.

    I’ve got two Wilmas, one that I bought maybe 7 years ago, and the newer model about a year ago. These things are crazy bright, and allow me to descend at full clip without fear of “going faster than my light”… the light extends out far enough that I see everything.
    What I REALLY like about Lupine is the upgrade-ability. I got a new lamp assembly for my older one and boosted the light output from ~990 lumens to closer to 2000. The kit cost me about $130 – and the old light got a new lease on life. I’m also STILL using the original batteries I bought way back then. Just a quality system, all the way around. Nice thing is that when I first asked my wife if I could get one, but was concerned about the cost, she said “how much would it cost if you crashed because of not enough light?” Yup, worth every penny.

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