Ryders Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG sunglasses review

Highly adjustable fit, plus greater clarity and definition on road or trail

Gear
Ryders has attempted to rectify issues with polarization with its Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG sunglasses, which purport to offer all the good of polarized lenses without the bad.

Ryders Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG sunglasses purport to offer all the good of polarized lenses without the bad.

Lowdown: Ryders Eyewear Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG Sunglasses

The ideal pair of bike riding sunglasses strikes an even balance between fit, function, and fashion. During the first half of the 2016 riding season, we’ve spent extensive time testing the Ryders Eyewear Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG, a pair of shades designed to accentuate the positives of polarized lenses, while minimizing the drawbacks. They are designed specifically for road use, but we’ve taken them on the trail, too. Read the full review below to find out how they performed.

Stat Box
Weight: 29 grams Fit: Medium/large
Adjustability: Nose pads and temple tips Curve: 8C
Lens colors: Light grey, green (tested), brown MSRP: $150
Protection: UV400, impact resistant Rating: 4 Flamin' Chili Peppers 4 out of 5
Frame colors: Matte black, blue/green (tested), orange/yellow

Pluses
Minuses
  • Light weight
  • Single lens set included
  • Anti-slip nose pads and temples
  • Dark tint for forest riding
  • Adjustable nose pads and temples
  • Not photochromic
  • No fogging issues
  • Expensive
  • Impact resistant
  • Minimal distortion
  • Scratch resistant coating
  • Functional polarization
  • Semi-casual appearance
  • Secure fit

Review: Ryders Eyewear Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG Sunglasses

Polarized lenses help filter out glare (a good thing), but they can also make it harder to see things such as smartphone screens and slippery manhole covers (not so good for cyclists). Ryders has attempted to rectify this with its Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG sunglasses, which purport to offer all the good of polarized lenses without the bad. They’re designed specifically for road cyclists, but during testing we also used them on a number of trail rides.

We've worn these shades on all manner of outings, including at a Mavic press launch in Spain. Thumbs up all the way.

We’ve worn these shades on all manner of outings, including at a Mavic press launch in Spain. Thumbs up all the way.

The Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG also have, you guessed it, a fog busting hydrophobic layer that’s designed to absorb and disperse water vapor, thus preventing it from condensing of the surface of your lens and making you temporarily blind. You just need to remember to keep them clean, as dirt and grease build-up can clog the fog resistant layer. And if the lens does fog, a quick wipe resets the anti-fog treatment. You’re also advised to wear them as far away from you face as is comfortable to improve airflow.

The anti-slip temples and nose piece are highly adjustable.

The anti-slip temples and nose piece are highly adjustable.

In about three months of wearing these shades on the road and trail, lens performance has been as good as advertised. The effect of the polarization is akin to turning up the contrast on a photo. Everything is a little clearer and more defined. And no, reading text messages or emails is not an issue, which is something I can’t say for standard polarized shades I’ve worn. Fog has also been a non-issue, though in Colorado’s dry climate, that’s the case for most of the glasses I wear.

Continue to page 2 for more of our Ryders Eyewear Seventh veloPOLAR antiFOG sunglasses review


About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Olympics, Tour de France, MTB world champs, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures all over the globe. Sumner, who joined the Mtbr staff in 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and is the author of the cycling guide book "75 Classic Rides: Colorado." When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying life with his wife Lisa and kids Cora and Tommy in and around their home in the MTB Mecca of Crested Butte.


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  • JIM says:

    Bought the antifog photochromic thorn glasses not impressed at all sit really close to face so they fog up with sweat really easy. Called them they said I should buy a different model that doesn’t sit so close to face, kinda done with this company $150 down the drain. If anybody has any suggestions for glasses that don’t fog to bad I would sure appreciate it as I just got 10 stitches right below my eye so I am trying to find some eye protection glasses I can see through again. Thanks

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