Saris SuperClamp EX 4-Bike rack review

Compact and sturdy tray rack with room for four bikes

Gear
Is a handy tool on the test Tacoma

The Tacoma is loaded up and ready for adventure.

What is it

Mtbr has always been impressed by the quality of Saris bike racks that are made in the USA and come with a lifetime warranty. But functionality and appearance weren’t quite dialed with the SuperClamp that we tested in the past. With the new SuperClamp EX, however, they may have a best-in-class four-bike hitch rack on their hands.

Mtbr’s Take

Pros
  • Very compact for a four-bike tray
  • Sturdy for a 63-pound rack that can be moved around
  • Tilts up and down with easy-to-reach lever
  • Elevated rails avoid handlebar conflict even with wide bars
  • Includes cable locks for extra security
  • Strap option is good to have
  • USA made with lifetime warranty
Cons
  • Because arms are shared, second bike not as easy to put on
  • $850 is a lot to spend
Lever is big and ideally positioned.

The tilt lever is big and well positioned.

Specifications:
  • Platform style hitch bike rack
  • Carries 4 bikes (60 lb/bike in trays closest to vehicle; 35 lb/bike for second two trays)
  • Two shepherd’s hooks hold bike by top of both wheels — does not touch the frame of the bike
  • Adjustable arms and wheel trays fit almost any type of bicycle, including eBikes. Bike spacing accommodates widest combination of bicycles.
  • Bikes are packed in tight but are secure

    Bikes are packed in tight but also are secured.

  • Integrated locking cable to secure bikes to the rack
  • Includes locking hitch pin to secure the rack to the hitch
  • Tilting feature allows access to rear of vehicle, even when fully loaded, and folds up against car when not in use
  • Features small profile for a 4-bike car rack
  • Ratcheting arms pivot on case hardened brackets for superior strength
  • Reflectors on outside wheel trays provide extra visibility in low light
  • Bottle opener integrated into tilt handle
  • For use with 2″ hitches only
  • Rack weight: 63 pounds
  • Rack fits wheelbase up to 48″
  • Universal wheel trays accommodate a wide variety of bikes and wheel sizes, up to 4″ tires
  • Price: $850
Arms are sturdy and can handle all tire sizes

Arms are sturdy and can handle all tire sizes

We believe this is a best in class four-bike tray rack, thus it earns the coveted Mtbr 5-star review.

Rating: 5 out of 5 5 Flamin' Chili Peppers
Price: $849.99
More Info: www.saris.com

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

About the author: Francis Cebedo

The founder of mtbr and roadbikereview, Francis Cebedo believes that every cyclist has a lot to teach and a lot to learn. "Our websites are communal hubs for sharing cycling experiences, trading adventure stories, and passing along product information and opinions." Francis' favorite bike is the last bike he rode, whether it's a dirt jumper, singlespeed, trail bike, lugged commuter or ultralight carbon road steed. Indeed, Francis loves cycling in all its forms and is happiest when infecting others with that same passion. Francis also believes that IPA will save America.


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Wordpress Comments:

  • jared S says:

    4 and 1/2 stars. This rack is limited on tire size. If the rack allowed up to 5″ tires, then 5 stars.

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      Fair point Jared S. But we actually believe that Fat tire compatibility is better off as an option. Fat bike tires make compromise tray spacing, tray fit and strap length. So to offer full fat bike compatibility for 4 bikes, the rack gets big and cumbersome. Better to have it as an option to convert one tray to fat bike compatible.

      As it stands, all trays can handle up to a 4″ tire, all Plus bikes.

  • Sean says:

    Francis:

    Have you actually tested loading 4 fatbikes with 4″ tires on that rack? Try some current models with 197mm rear hub spacing and 150mm wide front hubs. Interested to see if you can actually load 4 of them without the bikes interfering. Something Thule missed in the design of their T2 Pro on initial release as I recall.

    -Sean

    • Francis Cebedo says:

      That is a good point Sean. I’ve tried 3 inch tires and there’s clearly enough room on the trays for 4″. But actual fat bikes with wider axles, I doubt that will fit since it’s so tight already. I’ll give it a try.

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