Schwalbe Addix rubber compound primer

Increased durability and grip thanks to new controlled mixing process

Sea Otter Classic Tires

2017 Sea Otter Classic

Schwalbe Addix Nobby Nic

Each tire reveals its compound with a colored strip on the tread.

Schwalbe has completely overhauled the compounds used in its mountain bike tire lineup. This revamp signals good things for riders who love Schwalbe rubber, but who weren’t crazy about its sometimes short lifespan. To help improve performance of its tires in each of its mountain bike categories, Schwalbe hired Wolfgang Arenz, the man who developed Continental’s long-wearing Black Chili compound.

Schwalbe Addix

Tread patterns and casings are still the same. So fear not. If you’re a fan of the Magic Mary or Hans Dampf, you can still get them, but they’ll hopefully last a bit longer than before.

They’re also using new machinery heretofore reserved for the auto industry. It includes a cooling phase at each step of the mixing. This allows Schwalbe to better control the outcome of the mix and very specifically manipulate each compound’s characteristics. The result is Addix, a series of four compounds specifically developed for cross-country race, all-mountain/trail, enduro, and gravity. Here’s the breakdown: Speed = XC race; Speedgrip = XC/AM/Trail; Soft = Enduro and Downhill; Ultra Soft = Gravity.

To learn more listen to PR man Sean Cochran explain how the German tire maker came up with the new compound.

The Speed compound is all new, while the other three are replacements for existing compounds. Schwalbe expects the Speedgrip to be the most popular, aimed at general riding in mixed terrain and conditions. It offers similar rolling resistance to its predecessor, but a 62% increase in durability, Schwalbe claims. Interestingly, Schwalbe also claims that compound performance across the range is stable down to freezing temps. Good news for the fat bike crowd.

Schwalbe Addix

Schwalbe completely overhauled the compounds used in its mountain bike tire range. From Speed to Ultra Soft, the discipline specific compounds offer increased performance and improved durability.

To quickly identify the compounds, Schwalbe is using a colored stripe on the tread, which wears off in a few rides. It matches the sidewall markings that denote which compound is used.

Schwalbe Addix

The Speedgrip compound will be the most popular in the new Addix line.

Good news for consumers is that pricing has not changed, and older tires will be reduced in price. The new line of Addix tires is available now. Head over to www.schwalbetires.com for additional details.

This article is part of Mtbr’s coverage of the 2017 Sea Otter Classic in Monterey, California. For more from Sea Otter CLICK HERE.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

About the author: Nick Legan

Nick Legan is happiest with some grease under his nails and a long dirt climb ahead. As a former WorldTour team mechanic, Legan plied his trade at all the Grand Tours, Spring Classics, World Championships and even the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In recent years, gravel and ultra-distance racing has a firm grip on Legan’s attention, but his love of mountain biking and long road rides hasn’t diminished. Originally a Hoosier, Legan settled in Boulder, Colorado, 14 years ago after finishing his time at Indiana University studying French and journalism. He served as the technical editor at VeloNews for two years and now contributes to Adventure Cyclist, Mtbr and RoadBikeReview.


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  • mort says:

    Great, now if you can update your U.S. website!

  • bob says:

    I have loved the Trailstar compound on my 27.5 x 2.6/2.8 Nobby Nic tires and wonder why they are not producing the NN with the Addix SOFT compound. The NN Trailstar has been an all-mountain/enduro staple and I need the better grip for rocks and roots.

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