See what’s slowing Aaron Gwin down

New TRP G Spec downhill brakes a custom collaboration

Components Interbike

Interbike Mtbr

The G Spec is compatible with Shimano I-Spec and SRAM Matchmaker shift levers.

The G Spec is compatible with Shimano I-Spec and SRAM Matchmaker shift levers.

Aaron Gwin’s No. 1 focus is never slowing down (except in the offseason). The reigning U.S. national and World Cup overall downhill champion earns his keep staying off the brakes as much as possible. But when it does come time to scrub speed, the YT Bikes rider has a new weapon. Meet the G Spec, a collaborative design between Gwin and brake sponsor TRP that was being shown at the Interbike trade show in Las Vegas.

“We basically gave him a blank slate and said let’s build the best brakes for you,” explained TRP marketing manager Cody Phillips.

The new lever blade is longer, flatter, and taller, while also delivering better leverage and tactile feel.

The new lever blade is longer, flatter, and taller, while also delivering better leverage and tactile feel.

That meant creating a new lever blade that’s longer, flatter, and taller, while also delivering better leverage and tactile feel. TRP also added detents to the reach adjust, tightened pad tolerances to minimize rattle, and added cooling fins to the caliper to create more surface area, thus dissipating heat more efficiently.

“We’re also using ceramic pistons, which dropped about 30 grams on the brakeset,” added Phillips of a process that required 10 prototypes before the final production model was nailed down. “Aaron helped us a lot with the process. He knew what he wanted and asked for it.”

Tighter pad tolerances mean less chance of rattle on the trail.

Tighter pad tolerances mean less chance of rattle on the trail.

While geared primarily to downhill racing, Phillips says the G Spec could also have application in the enduro world, be it the rowdiest realm of that world. “If you’re on a 6” bike riding super technical tracks, this is a great brake,” he said. “It’s in line with a Shimano Saint or Zee set-up weight wise, but has the same power as a Hope DH brake or Avid Code. It’s powerful and consistent. You can be 15 minutes into a run and it will still feel right without any fade.”

Other features include compatibility with Shimano I-Spec and SRAM Matchmaker, along with a two-piece rotor that has recessed slots, which allow debris to slide out. The rotors also have ample surface area, which helps extend pad life.

When Aaron Gwin is on the team, you give him what he wants.

When Aaron Gwin is on the team, you give him what he wants.

The G Spec has not reached full production yet, so final pricing has not been set. But expect it to come in at $200-$250 per wheel. Expected launch is early next year. For more info visit www.trpbrakes.com.

This article is part of Mtbr’s coverage of the 2016 Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. For more from Interbike CLICK HERE.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)
About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures all over the globe. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and is the author of the cycling guide book "75 Classic Rides: Colorado." When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying time with his wife Lisa and daughter Cora.


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