Spurcycle Tool review

Made in America, minimalist multitool for gram counters

Gear
Spurcycle Tool

Spurcycle’s Tool uses a machined titanium, sliding handle and hardened steel bits. An included snap-closure pouch keeps them all together.

What is it

Slim enough to fit in most any jersey pocket or seat pack, Spurcycle’s Tool has a machined titanium socket and arm accompanied by 10, chrome-coated bits. To keep things tidy, a small cloth snap pocket houses the tool.

Pros
  • Made in USA, 10-bit multi-tool
  • Small overall size fits nicely in a jersey pocket or seat bag
  • 90-gram weight is great
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No detents on the arm means it can slide while in use
Mtbr’s Take

Spurcycle made its name with a series of well-crafted bells that quickly became a lust-worthy accessory for the cyclist who has it all. The Tool from Spurcycle brings the same quality materials, titanium and hardened steel in this case, to a small, carry-along multi-tool. Instead of going the fold-out route that most of us imagine when thinking of a multi-tool, Spurcycle went with a bit/socket tool.

Spurcycle Tool

The Spurcycle Tool is a great carry-along bit/socket tool.

As a minimalist who also puts a priority on utility, I’m a fan of bit/socket tools. Why carry multiple handles if one will suffice? A series of bits means that you can loosen or tighten a series of bolts without carrying unnecessary weight. The Spurcycle Tool includes 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm Allen, T10 and T25 Torx, and a #2 Phillips. For most cyclists, this spread will cover trailside/roadside adjustments with ease. In some cases, this is all you need when packing a bike for travel. That all of it comes in a 90-gram package is impressive.

Spurcycle Tool

All stowed, the Spurcycle Tool is only 4.5″ by 1.75″.

Like many socket tools, a magnet holds each bit in place. The lever of the tool slides along the socket, allowing for more or less leverage depending on the bolt in question. While sliding the socket, you can appreciate the tight tolerances of the machined pieces.

Spurcycle Tool

The sliding handle allows for infinite leverage options.

But no tool is perfect. In the case of the Spurcycle, I think it’s a fantastic first stab. But I have two qualms. First, at $69 this thing is super pricey. I get it. Titanium ain’t cheap. But did it really need to be made of titanium?

Secondly, I would love to have seen detents along the lever arm. This would keep the socket in place, whether at one of the ends or centered, along the arm. While in use, the arm can slide inside the socket and when tightening a carbon component you want a better feel on the bolt in need of adjustment.

Spurcycle Tool

Our only criticism is the lack of detents on the handle, meaning the bit socket can move easily while tightening a bolt.

For my money, I’ll stick with Victorinox’s BikeTool. It may be heavier (98 grams). It may have fewer bits (8). But I like its $40 price tag and that it comes with a pair of integrated tire levers. The lever arm of it is also a 5 mm Allen key, so you effectively get 10 tools in one.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 3.5 Flamin' Chili Peppers
Price: $69
More Info: www.spurcycle.com


About the author: Nick Legan

Nick Legan is happiest with some grease under his nails and a long dirt climb ahead. As a former WorldTour team mechanic, Legan plied his trade at all the Grand Tours, Spring Classics, World Championships and even the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In recent years, gravel and ultra-distance racing has a firm grip on Legan’s attention, but his love of mountain biking and long road rides hasn’t diminished. Originally a Hoosier, Legan settled in Boulder, Colorado, 14 years ago after finishing his time at Indiana University studying French and journalism. He served as the technical editor at VeloNews for two years and now contributes to Adventure Cyclist, Mtbr and RoadBikeReview. To follow along on Legan’s cycling adventures, find him on Instagram at @nlegan and be sure to check out his new book Gravel Cycling: The Complete Guide to Gravel Racing and Adventure Bikepacking.


Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*


THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.