Spy shots of updated FOX Live Valve

Electronic suspension aid nearing production

Components Forks
FOX originally intended to develop a fender that could mount via the hardware integrated on the backside of the fork arch. They are now repurposing this hardware to mount the Live Valve accelerometer.

FOX originally intended to develop a fender that could mount via the hardware integrated on the backside of the fork arch. They are now repurposing this hardware to mount the Live Valve accelerometer (click to enlarge).

For purists, the slow encroachment of electronics into mountain biking is unwelcome, but the technology does have the potential to transform our riding experience for the better.

One example is the FOX Live Valve, which is an automated electronic system that allows suspension to react instantly to terrain. The first prototypes were shown to the media last July, and it has since been spotted under a number of athletes. But we hadn’t seen any prototypes or received additional information in several months. That was until recently, when a tipster submitted several spy shots that reveals that the Live Valve system is still in development and getting much closer to production.

The FOX Live uses two accelerometers, one mounted to the fork, the other on the chainstays. In previous iterations, the fork mounted accelerometer was glued to the lowers, but in this version one of the accelerometers is now mounted to the backside of the arch.

Earlier versions of Live Valve used hardware CNC’d in their Santa Cruz Area machine shop, but the latest version appears to use production quality components.

Earlier versions of Live Valve used hardware CNC’d in their Santa Cruz area machine shop, but the latest version appears to use production quality components (click to enlarge).

Earlier versions had rudimentary hardware, but the streamlined interface and laser engraving makes it clear that these components are far closer to production.

You can flip the Live Valve brains either forward or backwards to improve fitment.

You can flip the Live Valve brains either forward or backwards to improve fitment (click to enlarge).

The brains of the Live Valve system are housed in an aluminum cylinder that resembles a shock reservoir. In prior images we have seen this canister mounted in line with the shock, in a similar configuration to the Float X. But it appears the piece can be mounted in either direction. This flexibility will allow the shock to be mounted into a wider range of existing frames.

A close up of the shock adjustments.

A close up of the shock adjustments (click to enlarge).

There are several adjustments you can make via the electronic system, but you can use an Allen key to tune the low speed compression adjustment on the fork and shock.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about this image is it offers insight into how the wiring system might integrate into existing frames.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about this image is it offers insight into how the wiring system might integrate into existing frames (click to enlarge).

The final update we noticed was to the battery mount. Previous designs used rubber grommets to hold everything in place, while this one features metal clamps.

Did you spy something we missed? Let us know in the comments.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

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