Surly Pugsley fat bike gets complete redesign

Intended to be the ultimate off-road touring and exploration rig

Fat Bike News
Surly Pugsley Downhill

The new Surly Pugsley is redesigned and ready for action.

To understand the Surly Pugsley and its intent best to hear from the creators themselves. “Way back in twenty-aught-three, we found ourselves tired of riding over the same old sorts of terrain,” Surly explains. “We wanted to go over there but the trail only went over here. We wanted to go for long rides on the beach. We wanted to get our float on in the winter. It was quite the conundrum. Seeing as there wasn’t a bike that could do all those things, we made one. Thus, the Pugsley was born and set free unto the world to wreak havoc on previously unridden territory.”

Surly Pugsley

The updated Pugsley comes equipped with Surly Edna 26×4.3 tires and a 1×11 drivetrain. The rear end will clear a 26x 4.8 tire.

Previously a great all-around fat bike, the Pugsley has been redesigned to be the ultimate off-road touring and exploration rig. Maximalist off-road tourists, explorers looking to get off the beaten path, and survivalists for whom being stranded isn’t an option will all appreciate Pugsley’s wider footprint, longer and more stable wheelbase, and plethora of accessory mounts.

In the rear, Pugsley now more closely resembles the rest of our dirt touring models with a few quirks of its own. It has a 142x12mm rear dropout with a dedicated Rohloff torque arm slot. If you’d rather run a standard 135mm quick-release setup, Surly 10/12 Adapter Washers allow you to do so. It still has the 17.5mm offset that Pugsley is known for, but they’ve also offset the rack mounts. Rear racks now fit centered over the tire the way the dark lord intended.

But what good is a rack if you kick your pannier every pedal stroke, right? To mitigate that, they lengthened Pugsley’s chainstays by 12mm. That extra 12mm also equates to extra stability and improved handling.

Surly Pugsley

Any bike will get you out there. Pugsley will get you home.

While the complete bike rolls on Surly Edna 26×4.3 tires and a full 1×11 drivetrain, the rear will clear a full 26×4.8 if you use a wider Q-factor crank and are ok with some drivetrain limitations. Complete bikes also feature Surly Moloko handlebar for a multitude of hand positions and accessory mounting. And while on the subject of accessories… Pugsley has a slew of mounting options: three-pack mounts (two on the fork, two on the downtube), a water bottle mount on the seat tube, and front and rear rack mounts.

Built For Adventure

The redesigned Pugsley has a slew of mounting option.

Pugsley’s 135mm-spaced fork has the same 17.5mm offset as the rear. This helps with wheel swapability. Throw an extra freewheel on the front hub and make the ‘ol switcheroo if you find yourself with a blown rear freehub or mangled derailleur. Any bike will get you out there. Pugsley will get you home. If you’re looking for 4.8 tire clearance to match the rear, you can easily swap the stock fork with a Moonlander fork to make it so.

Surly Pugsley

Let Pugsley take you places you never thought possible by bike and look cool doing it.

For more info head to surlybikes.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)


About the author: Mtbr

Mtbr.com is a site by mountain bikers for mountain bikers. We are the best online resource for information for mountain bikers of all abilities, ages and interests.


Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Ben says:

    Loaded panniers, rear only, off road, in the snow?

    That is one unstable set up to ride on snow, better bet is loading both ends, or skipping the rear panniers and using a seat bag, frame bag, and bar bag.

    Surly, answering a question that no one asked…

    • jiw71 says:

      I don’t believe this bike is for any snow depth…………..maybe snow packed trails and roads. It’s just too heavy and cumbersome looking to be riding in snow. The photos of the terrain they are riding speaks for themselves. (a novelty item)

Leave a Reply to Ben Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*


THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.