This is the hot rod inspired Ibis Ripley of your dreams

Subtle pinstriping goes a long way

29er All Mountain Trail
Inspired by Hot Rod culture, Casey used paint and custom decals to turn his stock Ripley into a one of a kind ride.

Inspired by Hot Rod culture, Casey used paint and custom decals to turn his stock Ripley into a one of a kind ride (click to enlarge).

While the Ibis Ripley looks great in its stock trim, Casey Devonshire isn’t one to leave things stock. With a liberal application of pinstriping and some decals, he transformed his bike into something unique.

Ibis doesn’t paint the eyes of the Ibis bird on to its head tube, but after seeing Casey’s bike, we think that’s a mistake.

Ibis doesn’t paint the eyes onto to it’s head tube, but after seeing Casey’s bike, we think that’s a mistake (click to enlarge).

While it’s easy to go overboard with the matchy-matchy stuff, restraint and attention to detail are they key to building something tasteful that can stand the test of time. Casey’s Ripley is all about the subtle things. There’s something to be said about a bike that surprises you after the 50th time you’ve stared at it.

Casey actually cut down a larger decal to wrap around his Evol can because he preferred the look.

Casey actually cut down a larger decal to wrap around his Evol can because he preferred the look (click to enlarge).

You know what’s never a mistake? Fox heritage decals.

Decals, air brush film, an exacto knife, and a steady hand are required for this project.

Decals, air brush film, an exacto knife, and a steady hand are required for this project (click to enlarge).

With a little expertise in masking borrowed from the hot rod, Casey was able to create this two tone effect on the Ibis decals around the frame.

It’s the little things.

It’s the little things (click to enlarge).

To complete this project required stripping down the entire frame, so why not paint the links too?

To the untrained eye, Casey’s Ripley looks like a stock color option.

To the untrained eye, Casey’s Ripley looks like a stock color option (click to enlarge).

Just like stock, only better.

When was the last time you saw a modern mountain bike wheelset that was tied and soldered?

When was the last time you saw a modern mountain bike wheelset that was tied and soldered? (click to enlarge)

In addition to the paint and decals, Casey also custom built his wheels. What makes his special is the use of two techniques that most modern riders won’t be familiar with. The first is that he ties and solders his spokes, which he claimed increase the stiffness of the wheel. Jobst Bradt (RIP) would argue differently, but it looks cool either way. The second trick is the use brass spoke head washers to help take up play. I also use this method when hand building wheels, but mostly because I’ve found it helps minimize the spokes gouging the hubs – and it’s a nice subtle touch.

To compare Casey’s Ibis with the stock version, head over to www.ibiscycles.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

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  • craigsj says:

    Decals and ties spokes? I’d like to wake up from this “dream”.

  • brad says:

    I’m surprised more people don’t add custom paint. I added flamed pinstripes to a previous bike and customized the logos and added some striping to another. When you buy an off the shelf bike like 98% of us do, it’s a pretty easy, cheap, and fun customization. Cheaper and easier than buying a bunch of colored catalog parts to get your ‘matchy-matchy’ thing going. Plus if your bike gets stolen it’s super easy to ID it.

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