Thomson Elite Dropper Seatpost

Components Interbike

David Parrett is the main man at Thomson. Here, he shows us the details of their all new Elite Dropper seatpost. The adjustable seatpost market is very hot and there are several big names invested in it. Thomson has taken its time but they have built an attractive  dropper post in typical Thomson style.

We asked David why they are entering the complicated and demanding world of dropper posts and David responded by saying that they are losing loyal customers at a regular basis now as riders are migrating to dropper posts.  Riders are giving up their rigid posts and going to dropper posts in increasing numbers and there seems to be now slowing down for this trend.

The dropper post category has been around a long time but there still seems to be opportunity in this market. Riders want a light, attractive and most of all reliable product. These qualities are obvious but they are very difficult to achieve on dropper post because it is a very highly stressed component. Riders in this category can be big and strong and they have an inclination to push themselves and the bike to the most demanding trails available.

So the stage is set and the world is watching. Thomson is a master in materials and machining and the reliability of their seatposts is unparalleled. Will they succeed in going from a static device to a  fully active, suspension device? They’re certainly off to a great start in the design and prototype stages.

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Features are:

  • 5″ of  infinite adjustment
  • Variable speed of seatpost rise(due to cam actuator)
  • local lever or remote lever compatible
  • large internals to maximize strength and reliability
  • hex internal collet in stanchion to minimize unwanted seat movement.
  • Sizes: 30.9x400mm and 31.6x410mm
  • 450 grams
  • MSRP: $399.00
  • 2 year warranty
  • Available March 1, 2013

 

From the manufacturer:
“You want the increased control a dropper post gives you but you had to give up your Thomson post to have it. Not any longer, you can put your Thomson post back on the bike! Our cartridge based system is designed to have the longest service life in the industry. If repair is needed it is fast, affordable and simple. Every single component is the best available. Custom made Norglide bearing bushings, custom made Trelleborg O-Rings and seals, Thomson saddle clamps and fasteners, Motul Oil. This is the drop post good enough to be called a Thomson Elite. 450 grams, the lightest drop post available.”

For more info: bikethomson.com

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About the author: Gregg Kato

Gregg Kato studied journalism and broadcasting in college while working many different jobs including deejaying, driving a forklift and building web sites (not all at the same time). Kato has been the Site Manager of Mtbr.com for over 12 years and enjoys riding local Santa Cruz trails. Besides being an avid mountain biker, he is also a motorcycle fanatic. Two wheels, one Passion.


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  • Top Cable Mount says:

    Was excited about Thomson entering this market, until I saw the cable mount at the top of the seat post. :(

  • Mindless says:

    Where do I pay?

  • Jeff says:

    RockShox, Specialized, Fox, Crank Brothers, KindShock and X-Fusion. What about Gravity Dropper; still the best IMO. The cable at the top that moves with the seat is lame for a ‘new” post design.

  • Pringle says:

    Have to agree about the cons of having the cable mount at the top and move with the seat. It’s a PIA to route the cable (I have a RS Reverb with same setup) and it’s PIA to get the bike clamped in to a workstand with the cable in the way. My LBS broke the cable off removing the bike from the stand right at the end of the build process, ugh…

    I understand that perhaps it’s done to make the non-remote option available, but really how many people will even be buying it without the remote? Might as well just use a QR in that case.

    • MellowYellowCJ7 says:

      A non-remote is still miles better than a QR. I tried to use a QR in a 30 minute Super-D. Ugh that did not go well at all. I would have killed for a dropper post that day. :)

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