Transition Bikes & Anvl Components At Sea Otter

News Sea Otter Classic

Anvl Components - New Tilt Pedal

I met up with the guys from Transition Bikes in the media parking area at Sea Otter where they were unloading a beautiful metallic green Carbon Covert bike they’d made for one of their pros. They were also showing off their new project, Anvl Components. Right now they have a bar, stem, saddle, pedals, wheels, hubs and grips in the new Anvl line. They described Anvl as no-compromises components with lots of 5-axis machining and “an emphasis on design aesthetics” – that means their parts are purty :-)

I think the Tilt pedal (top) is the most striking of the new Anvl components. It’s 14mm thick all the way across with triple cartridge bearings on the outside, DU bushings on the inside and a chromoly spindle. They weigh 375 grams a set.

Anvl Components - Arc Stem & Mandrel Bar

The Arc stem is also pretty impressive and a great demonstration of Anvl’s intricate CNC machine work. It’s seen here with the 35mm Anvl Mandrel bar, which is 800mm wide and comes with either a 20-degree or 35-degree rise. The Arc stem will be available in 50m or 60mm lengths. I took a few pictures of it so make sure to check the gallery below to see all the subtle details.

Front Hub - Anvl Components Scale Wheelset

Anvl’s new Scale wheels are available in 26, 27.5 and 29-inch versions with 24mm rims, and they have a Scale DH wheelset as well. The hubs are custom machined with laser-etched graphics and they’re compatible with all axle sizes. The rear uses a two-step, 6-pawl freehub with 4 degrees of engagement. Since I know the weight weenies are going to ask, the 26-inch wheelset weighs in at 1620 grams.

Anvl Components - Forge Saddle - Side View

The Forge saddle comes in Ti, carbon and chromoly. The carbon version weighs just 158 grams and they all have Kevlar side panels for durability. Even though the Forge saddles have a super low profile and are very light, the Transition guys say they’re still great for everyday riding.

Transition Team Carbon Covert With New Anvl Components

The photo above is the sweet Team Issue Carbon Covert the Transition guys had when I saw them. Note that it’s set up with what they were calling the “Anvl 9-piece trim kit.” There are only three Coverts frames in this color right now, so if you see someone riding one, stay out of the way cause it’s a pretty safe bet you’re just blocking the trail! The photo below is Nate Furbee riding one in the Sea Otter Classic pro downhill – although he doesn’t have the Anvl parts on his bike.

Nate Furbee On The Transition Team Issue Carbon Covert

Transition Bikes & Anvl Components At Sea Otter Gallery
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Anvl Components - New Tilt Pedal
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Anvl Components - New Tilt Pedal

Anvl Components - Arc Stem & Mandrel Bar
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Anvl Components - Arc Stem & Mandrel Bar

Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Top Front View
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Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Top Front View

Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Front View
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Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Front View

Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Bottom View
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Anvl Components - Arc Stem - Bottom View

New Anvl Components Scale Wheelset
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New Anvl Components Scale Wheelset

Rear Hub - Anvl Components Scale Wheelset
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Rear Hub - Anvl Components Scale Wheelset

Front Hub - Anvl Components Scale Wheelset
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Front Hub - Anvl Components Scale Wheelset

Anvl Components - New Rasp Grip
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Anvl Components - New Rasp Grip

Anvl Components - Forge Saddle
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Anvl Components - Forge Saddle

Anvl Components - Forge Saddle - Side View
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Anvl Components - Forge Saddle - Side View

Nate Furbee On The Transition Team Issue Carbon Covert
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Nate Furbee On The Transition Team Issue Carbon Covert

Transition Team Carbon Covert With New Anvl Components
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Transition Team Carbon Covert With New Anvl Components

The Transition Team Carbon Covert in a special green finish they made just for their pro racers. This bike is kitted out with Transition's new Anvl Components 9-piece "trim kit."
About the author: John Shafer

John Shafer, a.k.a. Photo-John, is a photographer, cyclist, skier and general outdoor lover. He’s happiest when he’s on his bike or skis, taking pictures in the backcountry. He’s been on the Mtbr team since 1999 running PhotographyREVIEW.com as well as contributing photos and articles on Mtbr. John has been taking pictures since college and believes everyone can be a good photographer if they just learn a few simple rules. He loves big mountains, rocky singletrack, powder days, 6-inch trail bikes, coffee and tacos. Look for him pushing his bike uphill, carrying an inappropriate amount of camera gear in an overloaded backpack.


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