Turner’s RFX returns as a full carbon enduro racer / aggressive trail bike

160mm of all mountain dw-link travel rolling on 27.5 wheels

27.5 Enduro
The RFX returns for 2016 in Toray hi-mod carbon with 27.5" wheels and 160mm of dw-link suspension.

The RFX returns for 2016 in Toray hi-mod carbon with 27.5″ wheels and 160mm of dw-link suspension (click to enlarge).

Turner has just announced the return of the RFX. Virtually a cult classic, the 2016 RFX is back in a full carbon version made from Toray hi modulus carbon fiber and utilizing the industry standard for enduro – 27.5″ wheels. It is designed as an aggressive trail bike/enduro racer. Like all of its brethren, the RFX (officially dubbed the RFX v4.0) features dw-link suspension so we’re sure it will deliver the plush travel that Turner is known for.

The RFX is ready for stealth routing of dropper cables.

The RFX is ready for stealth routing of dropper cables (click to enlarge).

Claimed weight for a complete medium bike with high end build is 27.5 lbs. The bike will be available in 4 sizes (SM, MD, LG, XL) and 5 build kits plus a frame only option.

Pricing
  • Frame only: $2995
  • SRAM GX Build – $4573
  • Shimano XT Build – $5610
  • SRAM X01 Build – $5737
  • SRAM XX1 Build – $6207
  • Shimano XTR Build – $6533
  • Available wheel upgrades: I9 Torch, DT Swiss XRC 1250, I9 Carbon, Enve/DT Swiss 240

The RFX v4.0 has plenty of tire clearance (like most Turner models) and will fit 2.4″ tires with ease. It has a race-oriented 66 degree head angle and the frame features a unique head tube dimension that allows riders to customize the head angle in half degree increments all the way to a super slack 64.5 degrees (when paired with a 160mm fork). The seat angle is 73.5 degrees and the dw-link suspension provides 160mm of travel.

All new Turner RFX version 4.0 feature highlights
  • C6 Turner Carbon
  • dw-link suspension with 160mm of travel
  • 27.5″ wheels
  • 49-62mm taper head tube
  • 142x12mm thru axle
  • Downtube rock guard
  • Stealth dropper routing
  • Post mount disc brakes
  • Alloy cable clamps

Turner Product Manager, Erik Trogden explains, “We weren’t going to rush this just have another ‘me-to’ frame, we wanted something that was going to be the best. We knew that the enduro segment would continue to grow and be the largest in the MTB industry and we spent a long time developing the RFX to get it right.” Turner is calling their new RFX the “Enduro Game Changer”.

A close-up of the lower links.

A close-up of the lower links (click to enlarge).

We are glad to see Turner giving some of the bigger players in the game a run for their money. For sure, switching from US made aluminum bikes to overseas carbon wasn’t an easy decision, but looking back it was the only choice. Turner bikes have always had a strong following in the Mtbr forums and with bikes like this new RFX version 4.0, it’s easy to see why. This bike joins other Turner models like the Czar, Burner v3.1 and the King Khan showing that Turner will remain in the game for many more years to come.

For more information visit www.turnerbikes.com.


About the author: Gregg Kato

Gregg Kato studied journalism and broadcasting in college while working many different jobs including deejaying, driving a forklift and building web sites (not all at the same time). Kato enjoys riding local Santa Cruz trails. Besides being an avid mountain biker, he is also a motorcycle fanatic. Two wheels, one Passion.


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  • Vato says:

    Nice. I’d like it in alloy though.

  • Don says:

    That’s a badass looking bike.

  • loll says:

    At first glance, i thought I was looking at an aluminum frame.

    Would be great if it comes in alloy, since we know how it will look already. And the price can drop about a grand? That will be nice

  • bond007jms says:

    @loll Nope – DT would produce an alloy version in the US. This would make the price comparable to the price of a carbon frame produced overseas, so he went carbon. Also, when he searched for a carbon frame manufacture in the US, he did not find one that met his criteria.

  • Cooper says:

    Very nice bike! I would have preferred to see a slightly longer TT and hope it can come in alloy for those (like me) who desire American-made instead of Ch-arbon. Please DT, keep alloy your mainstay for frame material!

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