Velocity P35 Review

Components Pro Reviews

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Reviewed by Brian Mullin http://www.gramslightbikes.com/

At the 2009 Interbike, I was highly intrigued by the Australian rim maker Velocity P35 or Pacenti 35 rims. The ultra wide 35mm rim, is 22mm deep with an inside width of 29.5mm, and seemed ideal for fat tires and brutal All Mountain riding. The rim was co-designed by Kirk Pacenti, who is also well known for his development of the 650b wheel size for mountain bike use. The P35 is available in 26”, 650b, and 29” sizes, drilled with either 32 or 36 holes, and comes in black, silver, white, electric red (shown) and antifreeze green.

Velocity was kind enough to send along a set of the P35′s, which were built with their own hubs, and their brand new tubeless kit installed. They have been thoroughly tested on my Ibis Mojo, and recently the front has been used on my Yeti ASR 7.

Build Specs:
Rim: Velocity P35
Size: 26 inch
Color: Electric Red
Front – Velocity ATB 20mm 32 hole black
Rear – Velocity ATB 32 hole black
Spokes: DT Competition 2.0/1.8
Spoke pattern: 3 cross
Nipples: brass silver 2.0

vel_p35_hubs

Installation
The rims came installed with their new Velotape (blue tape not yellow) which is specifically designed to convert P35 rims and wheelsets to a tubeless mode. You can also purchase a two tire kit for $24.99, which includes 10 meters of tape, and two tubeless valves with removable cores. I have installed the same sort of tape, and basically you apply the tape in the center of the rim, and slowly lay it down, keeping the roll of tape taut, with a strong enough pull to stretch it slightly, and push it down with your finger tip to adhere it to the cavity, until you cover the entire circumference plus a couple of extra inches. Then you pierce the valve hole, and insert the valve stem and tighten its nut down.

vel_tape

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About the author: Brian Mullin

Brian has been part of the Mtbr team since 2007, where he has become an integral member of the review and test staff, specializing in technical articles. He likes to push the limits in all the sports he obsesses in, whether it's mountain biking, whitewater kayaking, extreme skiing, or sport climbing. He takes those same strengths and a good dose of insanity to his reviewing and writing on mountain biking products, creating technical, in-depth and hyperbolic articles. Whenever he's not on the bike, he might be found watching MotoGP racing, otherwise look for him out on extremely technical singletrack.


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  • Barnaby Bear says:

    Isn’t the \lack of precise steering qualities\ directly related to the fact that they are \stable, rigid, ultra wide, with a large footprint, which makes any tire have better traction, control and comfort\?

    It seems to me that the two are intimately related. In other words, the fact that the tire is wider and more difficult to roll over is exactly why one would get the impression that that wheel didn’t handle precisely.

  • Brian Mullin says:

    Yes, to a degree they do correlate, I wanted to point out the steering issue, I have ridden some other wide rims that had slightly better steering, but there seems to be some other synergy going on (rim shape, spokes, hubs, ?) that makes it more anomalous.

  • Book Guy says:

    Are these the 650b version?

  • Brian Mullin says:

    I tested the 26er version. They do come in 26, 650b and 29. I am trying to set up a front test with the 650b.

  • Tit Janssen says:

    Softest rim I have ever ridden. 29er version. Just about every ride I am having to beat the lip of the rim back out. And when they do get dinged or bent the ano flakes off. I’m running 2.4 Nevegals so you would think that would keep them some what protected. Laced them to a set of Kings. Now begins he rebuild. These rims have been a big disappointment.

  • Brian Mullin says:

    Hmmm, sorry to hear that, I never had the issue, they are painted not anodized (as far as I know), and they do seem to scratch and gouge easily. What sort of pressure are you running? I run 25psi myself.

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