YT Jeffsy 29er trail bike

Gravity oriented brand YT launches the Jeffsy, it’s first 29er

29er All Mountain Trail News
With a roster that includes freeride legends like Cam Zink and Andreu Lacondeguy, YTs choice to release a 29er may raise eyebrows.

With a roster that includes freeride legends like Cam Zink and Andreu Lacondeguy, YTs choice to release a 29er may raise eyebrows (click to enlarge).

YT, which stands for young talents, is best known for its extremely well-priced direct-to-consumer product line which leans heavily towards the rowdier side of the bike spectrum. To give you a further feel for who this brand is, you only need to take one look at their team roster, which is filled with some of the most iconic names in freeride. They also just randomly signed a guy named Aaron Gwin.

The point that I’m trying to make is that YT is a gravity brand through and through. Their first product was a dirt jumper and they’ve since expanded to include a downhill rig and enduro race bike. Based on that product line, there was one thing missing – a trail bike.

Read our YT Jeffsy CF Comp 1 first ride review here.

CTO Stefan Willared and his team set out to build their version of a perfect trail bike three years ago and after testing everything, what they came up with surprised even them. Their newest is a 29er. Yes, a 29er. But it’s a 29er designed by YT, so it’s not your average trail bike. This new rig has 140mm of travel, one of the slackest headtubes in the category, and a curb scraping low BB.

The smaller frame sizes use a rear triangle with a 435m chainstay, while the large and extra large frames use a 5mm longer rear end.

The smaller frame sizes use a rear triangle with a 435m chainstay, while the large and extra large frames use a 5mm longer rear end (click to enlarge).

LIke the rest of the full suspension models in the YT lineup, the Jeffsy uses their Virtual 4 Link (cough *Horst Link*) Suspension. A flip chip on the shock mount allows the rider to adjust the geometry, which can take the headtube angle from 66.9 to 67.6 degrees and adjust the BB drop from 32mm to 24mm.

My only quibble from staring at the geometry chart is the top tube numbers, which seem to be on the shorter end of the spectrum. Of course, you can’t judge a bike by how it looks on paper.

The frame will be available in six different price points. The entry level models are built from aluminum and will retail between $2,699 and $3,499. The carbon versions will cost between $4,399 and $5,999.

For under $3,000, the new Jeffsy is a whole lot of bike. At that sub three thousand dollar price point, you’re still getting one hell of a bike. Think Pike RC up front, Monarch shock, Reverb post, DT wheelset, Shimano SLX drivetrain + stoppers, and a smattering of Raceface components. Claimed weight is 31.5 lb (or 14.3 KG)

For under $3,000, the new Jeffsy is a whole lot of bike. At that sub three thousand dollar price point, you’re still getting one hell of a bike. Think Pike RC up front, Monarch shock, Reverb post, DT wheelset, Shimano SLX drivetrain + stoppers, and a smattering of Raceface components. Claimed weight is 31.5 lb (or 14.3 KG) (click to enlarge)

If you’re thinking what a good deal the alloy models are, check out what their carbon bikes come spec’d with.

If you’re thinking what a good deal the alloy models are, check out what their carbon bikes come spec’d with (click to enlarge).

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the $6k Jeffsy CF Pro comes set up with the best from Fox, SRAM X01 drivetrain, Guide Ultimate brakes, Raceface Next SL Cranks, Renthal cockpit, carbon DT wheels, the works. No wonder the direct-to-consumer model is at the heart of so much controversy.

For more information visit www.jeffsy.com.

Photo Thumbnails (click to enlarge)

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  • PinkFloydLandis says:

    Your quibble about the top tube being on the shorter side is simply a consequence of the relatively steep effective seat tube angle. Better to consider the reach parameter for objective comparison of a frame’s length, and from that perspective, these are pretty long bikes.

  • PinkFloydLandis says:

    Kudos to YT for what might well be a “first” in suspension bikes: scaling the chainstay length w/ the frame sizes. I’m not aware of any other examples from other manufacturers, past or present.. If one believes there is a “sweetspot” in chainstay length, then its always been geometrically true that the optimal length would be longer for larger frames and shorter for smaller. Yet manufacturers have rarely/never done so, presumably due to increased tooling & inventory costs/hassles.

    • nono says:

      Norco has been doing that for a while:
      “With traditional frame designs, engineers adjust front-centre lengths for each frame size but use a single, fixed rear-centre length. This approach leaves riders of certain body types in a poor position when standing. Poor body position leads to uneven weight distribution and negatively affects traction, control and overall performance and ride characteristics.

      A simple solution to a complex problem, Gravity Tune fixes the front-centre/rear-centre ratio across all frame sizes, effectively optimizing geometry for every bike in the line. As a result, weight is always optimally distributed – regardless of rider height. Available only on Norco Bikes, Gravity Tune means equal ride characteristics and unrivalled control for all.”

      https://www.norco.com/tech/mountain/gravity-tune/

  • p brig says:

    Ugh what an annoying, cluttered web site. And it’s already sold out til mid summer. Good luck with that frame warranty.

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