Gear Reviews

Five Father’s Day gift ideas for cyclists under $50

Because Dad already has enough neckties and BBQ tools

Buying a Father’s Day gift for dad can be a headache. Rather than giving him a cliché gift such as a new set of BBQ tools or an ugly necktie, try impressing him with one of the following items. Even if you don’t know anything about bikes, you’re almost guaranteed to hit a home run with one of these great gifts.

Maxima SC1 Clear Coat

Maxima SC1 Cleaner

Maxima bills their SC1 cleaner as being a “new bike in a can” and we tend to agree. If you follow the simple instructions, it will leave your bike’s paint gleaming and help prevent future mud accumulation. It also works great on motorcycles and car interiors. Price $10 | More info at www.maximausa.com

Paul Bottle Opener and Disc Truing Tool

Paul Bottle Opener and Disc Truing Tool

There must be a dozen different ways to open a bottle with your bicycle, but we still love bottle openers. Especially when they’re combined with a handy tool, like a disc truing slot. We’ve been using this one by Paul Components for years. It’s made in Chico, California, and is available in a variety of colors. Price $20 | More info at wwww.paulcomp.com

Road ID

Road ID

The Road ID is a small customizable metal ID tag that lists your name, medical conditions, contact information, and more. This information could prove invaluable in the case of an accident, although we hope that you’ll never have to “use” it. Price $20 | More info at www.roadid.com

Specialized Zee Cage 2 with Tools

Specialized Zee Cage with Tool

Considering how simple a water bottle cages is, you’d be surprised to learn they’re not all created equal. We’ve found this side loading model from Specialized works well both on and off road, and love that it includes a cleverly mounted multi tool. Price $60 | More info at www.specialized.com

Spurcycle Bell

Spurcycle Bell

If you ride busy trails, having a bell on your bars is a must. Our favorite is this beautifully designed model from Spurcycle, which also happens to be manufactured right here in the United States. Price: $50 | More info at www.spurcycle.com

About the author: Mtbr

Mtbr.com is a site by mountain bikers for mountain bikers. We are the best online resource for information for mountain bikers of all abilities, ages and interests.


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  • a says:

    Those prices… Gotta love my arctica s197b – 40-50$ and work superbly well.

  • Doug in San Diego says:

    $260 ???!!

    For the abuse they take, I would prefer an article on cheap sunglasses

    • Don S in Illinois says:

      For the last decade, I have used industrial safety glasses on the bike. I started buying my own when I worked on the railroad and found that they worked very well on the bike, too. I get indoor/outdoor lenses (now with diopters) and they work great in just about any lighting condition. I pay less than $10 a pair for them and I think they are more stylish, IMHO, than what was shown in the article. Full Source and Safety Glasses USA are two good sources for a good selection.

      • macias says:

        I asked sometime about them and manufacturer response was since they were not designed to be used in sunlight condition they don’t have UV filter. For me $100 for sunglasses are exorbitant price, but $100 for your EYES… well, that sounds cheap so I won’t go with safety glasses (I used them when riding in the night, but by definition I didn’t need UV filter then).

  • Chad B says:

    Spending $200 on a pair of cycling sunglasses that are either going to get marred up in a crash or by getting shoved into a pack when light conditions get too low is absolutely ridiculous. These are either for those that have more money than they know what to do with or are sponsored by one of these companies. Typically end up using something I find on clearance or a pair of safety glasses that aren’t going to make me cry if they get broken in my pack.

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