New products from Phil Wood and Hope

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The new 35mm Hope stem is available in two different lengths.

The new 35mm Hope stem is available in two different lengths.

Hope

When Hope originally released their stems, the 35mm standard was just a ridiculous concept. Well, it’s now the defacto standard on virtually every new bike. To stay hip, the UK brand has released new 35mm stems. They’re available in two different lengths (35mm and 50mm) and six different colors.

We’re keeping our fingers crossed that this wider range prototype cassette makes it to production.

We’re keeping our fingers crossed that this wider range prototype cassette makes it to production.

For many years Hope teased us with an integrated cassette. The system is finally available in two ranges, 10-40t and 10-44t. The brand is also experimenting with different ratios. Their prototype HB2111 show bike was sporting a prototype 11-46T cassette.

For more information, visit www.hopetech.com.

Our favorite part about the new Phil Wood headsets is the complete lack of branding, except for the tasteful logo on the headset cap.

Our favorite part about the new Phil Wood headsets is the complete lack of branding, except for the tasteful logo on the headset cap.

Phil Wood

After two years of development and testing, Phil Wood is finally selling their new headset. They only have a 1 1/8th compatible model currently but are working on developing a full range for 1” and internal options.

The headsets are available in nine different colors. Retail is $150 for a headset and headset cap. For an additional $20, you get a matching spacer kit that includes five spacers.

When was the last time you drooled over track hubs?

When was the last time you drooled over track hubs?

Phil Wood recently turned 45 and to celebrate, they launched a limited collection of splash anodized track hubs. You don’t have to ride a track bike or fixie to find these hubs gorgeous.

Who doesn’t love purple?

Who doesn’t love purple?

The hubs are also available in this beautiful purple scheme. Phil doesn’t have any short term plans to produce more hubs with this treatment, but they are considering doing a small run of matching track cranks.

Phil has made some minor modifications to their freewheel design in order to improve serviceability.

Phil has made some minor modifications to their freewheel design in order to improve serviceability.

Phil also made some updates to their freehub internals. The old design used to have a spring that wrapped around the pawls in the cassette body. Some customers and shops found this difficult to remove and reinstall during service, so they redesigned it to use a set screw.

Price for the hub remains the same (around $400). That price also includes additional set pawls and set screws just in case you ever need to rebuild your hub.

For more information, visit www.philwood.com.

This article is part of Mtbr’s coverage of the 2016 Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. For more from Interbike CLICK HERE.


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  • Farmer Ted says:

    Only in the 21st century bicycle industry will a ‘ridiculous concept’ become the ‘defacto standard’ (with questionable advantages) within a year or two and force everything else into obsolescence.

    I’m so tired of this crap. Time to start a revolution, or at least boycott the industry.

    • RP says:

      First, it’s not defacto yet, I don’t see many bikes with 35mm bars stock yet.

      Second, this one will bite the industry in the ass. Look on any forums and many riders going back down because the 35mm bars are too stiff and unforgiving.

      35mm Bars didn’t fix anything and just created another issue. Now they’re trying to figure out how to make 35mm bars as compliant as 31.8.

    • Bman says:

      Ted, not single person is forcing you to buy a 35mm stem or bars. You can ride a 31.8 for the next 10 years if you want

      • Anonamoose says:

        Bman – that may be true for now, but it’s clear the bike industry is forcing change on consumers as fast as they can.

        As a smaller statured rider, I was recently insulted by the kids working at the big bike shop in town who told me that I need to replace my 26″ wheel XC bike because it’s obsolete. Getting a wheel rebuilt whould have taken twice as long as I expected because they would have to special order the parts. They don’t stock spares and they don’t offer a single bike anymore with 26″ wheels. Going down the street to the dying small-town shop, he’s happy to service the bike but is also unable to stock the insane variety of incompatible “standards” that have been pushed by the industry giants. I ended up buying a dusty pre-laced 26″ wheel from the LBS. It’s not carbon fiber and it didn’t cost thousands of dollars but it’s the right choice for me. 26″ is the best size wheel for people less than ~ 5’4″ tall.

        As for 35mm stems & bars, the industry can take their new XXXL parts and stick them where the sun don’t shine. They can’t name a single advantage of 35mm, it’s just another round of forced obsolescence. You’d have to be Andre the Giant to find a reason to justify the increased weight and cost 35mm diameter bar now or in 10 years from now.

  • peper says:

    ENVE isn’t offering a 35 mm bar because the claim there is no advantage to them. I’ll keep running regular bars.

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