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Review: PNW Loam dropper seatpost

The all-new PNW Loam Dropper is adjustable, reliable, and costs less than $200!

News Pro Reviews

PNW Components is launching a new dropper seatpost that’s affordable, reliable, and offers adjustable travel. The new PNW Loam post builds on the success of the company’s Bachelor and Rainier dropper seatposts a light and wallet-friendly package.

Related: The Best Dropper Seatposts

PNW Loam Dropper Post Highlights

  • Claimed 40g weight savings over the PNW Bachelor dropper
  • Lower insertion length and stack height
  • Adjustable return rate
  • Available in 200mm, 170mm, 150mm and 125mm versions
  • 30mm tool-free travel reduction in 5mm increments
  • Offered in 34.9, 31.6 and 30.9mm diameters
  • MSRP: $199
  • Available now
  • For more information visit pnwcomponents.com

 

PNW Loam Dropper Post

Lighter, lower, and more adjustable, meet the new PNW Loam dropper seatpost.

 

PNW machined excess material off the saddle head for additional weight savings and to allow for the stanchion to drop further into the seat post. This detail delivers a lower stack height and lowers the overall post length allowing for the opportunity to run longer travel posts on a wider range of bikes. PNW has also shortened the actuator allowing for increased compatibility and greater insertion depth. Combined, the new Loam Post is 18mm shorter in overall length than its predecessor, the Bachelor.

In addition to being shorter, the Loam is lighter than the previous Bachelor models. The redesigned stanchion and the use of an alloy air cartridge (rather than steel) saves a claimed 40 grams over the Bachelor.

 

 

The Seattle-based brand took favorite features from the company’s Rainer Gen 3 dropper, by incorporating a tool-free travel adjust system that allows for up to 30mm of travel reduction in 5mm increments. The adjustable air spring allows riders to fine-tune the return rate by adding or subtracting pressure from the air cartridge.

 

PNW Loam Dropper Post

Like matchy-matchy components? PNW has your back.

Aesthetic customizations can be made by swapping the silicone band that wraps around the seatpost collar, so you can make your dropper match your Loam lever or PNW’s grips.

PNW Loam Dropper Post Review

PNW Loam Dropper Post

The Loam’s adjustability makes it a winner.

As someone who swaps components between test bikes on a weekly basis, I appreciate the ability to adjust this dropper’s travel to maximize the amount of drop I can use across a range of seat tube lengths. Travel adjustment can be done in less than a minute and the etched marks under the dropper’s collar make travel adjustments a quick and painless process.

PNW Loam Dropper Post

Riders can quickly dial in the drop in 5mm increments.

While some riders don’t appreciate the velocity at which some droppers return to full length, I’ve always been in the faster-is-better camp. I appreciate the audible “thud” that comes with a fast-acting dropper letting me know it’s done its job. Adding a bit of pressure allowed me to get my preferred rapid return rate with just the right about of tactile feedback.

PNW Loam Dropper Post

An adjustable air cartridge lets riders fine-tune the return speed.

Once installed, the Loam delivers on its promise of being a set-and-forget component that does its job with unwavering dedication through months of testing.

Verdict

PNW Loam Dropper Post

The PNW Loam makes a resounding argument for why it should be your next dropper post

PNW has quickly built a name for itself as a brand that does an impeccable job of balancing price with performance. The Loam dropper continues this tradition with a number of key refinements that make it a category leader.

Shaving grams, reducing stack height and offering adjustable travel in a seatpost that retails for hundreds of dollars less than competitors’ dropper posts, many of which are heavier, longer, and don’t offer adjustable travel, makes a clear and resounding argument for why the Loam should be your next dropper post.

 

 


About the author: Josh Patterson

Josh has been riding and racing mountain bikes since 1998, and has been writing about mountain biking and cyclocross since 2006. He was also at the forefront of the gravel cycling movement, and is a multi-time finisher of Dirty Kanza. These days, Josh spends most of this time riding the rocky trails and exploring the lonely gravel roads around his home in Fort Collins, Colorado.


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