Round up: 5 hot enduro bikes for 2016

Trend towards slacker headtubes, longer top tubes, and shorter chainstays

27.5 Enduro Interbike
The new Patrol Carbon is Transition's second ever carbon fiber model.

The new Patrol Carbon is Transition’s second ever carbon fiber model (click to enlarge).

Transition Patrol Carbon

The 155mm travel Patrol was one of four new models Transition released last year that uses a Horst Link suspension design they call the GiddyUp Link (pun intended).

The move to internal cable routing and a 1x specific drivetrain makes the new Patrol look ultra clean.

The move to internal cable routing and a 1x specific drivetrain makes the new Patrol look ultra clean (click to enlarge).

The Carbon Patrol shares the same long and slack geometry of its aluminum sibling, but uses the new TITs (tubes inside tubes) internal cable routing system and will be 1x only. Pricing for the new carbon models won’t be released until the bike formerly launches in October, but Transition did hint that the build kits will be similar to those off the alloy models. Expected availability in late December/early January. For more information visit www.transitionbikes.com.

Why we can’t wait to test this bike |
The thing that has always set Transition apart from other manufacturers is their focus on fun. From bikes such as the Klunker, to product launch videos that feature lab coats and a mini pony (all at once), we dig the brand’s style – and how it translates on the trail.

The redesigned Troy takes several design cues from the 160mm travel Spartan.

The redesigned Troy takes several design cues from the 160mm travel Spartan (click to enlarge).

Devinci Troy Carbon

With only 140mm of rear travel, the Devincy Troy is the shortest travel bike in this roundup. Built with slacker, longer, and more aggressive geometry than most bikes in its category, the little bike is more than capable of holding its own against larger bikes.

The Troy can accommodate a water bottle, but things might get tight with a piggy back shock.

The Troy can accommodate a water bottle, but things might get tight with a piggy back shock (click to enlarge).

For 2016, the Troy has been updated with a significantly longer reach, shorter chain stays, and slightly improved rear tire clearance. Devinci will be offering both aluminum and carbon frames, although the carbon model will be 1x only. The alloy frame retails for $1,600, while the carbon frame is $2,100. Complete bikes will ship with short stems, wide bars, and a build kit worthy of hucking the gnar starting at $2,600. For more information visit www.devinci.com.

Why we can’t wait to test this bike |
Known best for the acclaimed Wilson downhill bike and a certain Canadian Chainsaw, Devinci is lesser known in the U.S. We love a good underdog and the new geometry suggests the Troy can punch well above its weight class.

This article is part of Mtbr’s coverage of the 2015 Interbike trade show in Las Vegas. For more from Interbike CLICK HERE.


Related Articles


NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*


THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.