Rylo review – 360 camera

Is this $500 360 degree camera ready for mountain biking?

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Typically mounted on the helmet, we put the Rylo on the bars for a better riding angle.

The Rylo 360 is a camera of dreams. As an owner of many action cams and gimbals, we find them a hassle to operate and edit the video. Gimbals seem to be a necessary tool to capture rough riding footage but they are not easy to live with. And proper aim, multiple angles, and cameras seem to be required to capture the experience.

The Rylo though promises to change all this. No more missed moments due to bad camera positioning resulting in a 10 minute shot of your front tire. With the Rylo, you select your angle “after” you shoot and one can even “follow” the action in 360 degrees. Film a friend in front of you then switch to a friend behind you, even film yourself with a selfie stick that magically disappears.


Promo video like the old GoPro videos is dreamy and promises to make your life look rad.

The Rylo pans between each angle with movements that are buttery smooth and the stabilization is futuristic, your footage looks like it was shot with a drone or a gimbal. It handles the shakiest situations like a champ, nothing fazes it. That’s the promise at least. Did it live up to the hype?

Frequent firmware updates are necessary for this camera software that seems to be improving rapidly.

Key Features

1. 360 Video: Capture everything around you in 4K 360 video. Create a regular HD video by selecting a traditionally-framed view within the 360 footage, or share a fully immersive video in 4K 360.

2. Image stabilization: the Rylo has built-in gyro-based image 6-axis stabilization to ensure stable video despite shaky hands or mounts. It can also level tilted video automatically.

3. Shoot first, point later. Like other 360 cameras, Rylo captures all directions at once and stitches them together using software. Aiming the camera is not much of an issue since it can be done during editing.


Rylo 360 camera is exceptional whencapturing Sierra Nevada trails in bright light

4. Subject tracking. During editing, you can follow any subject automatically like an intelligent tripod. Software can follow a subject or it can be pointed at different directions during editing.

5. FrontBack. This is a feature that is unique to where it can show a picture-in-picture effect of another view of the 360 video. You can use this for example to show the a view of the subject and the shooter at the same time.

6. Hyperlapse. A hyperlapse is like a timelapse, but the camera is moving, which creates a surreal effect. The app can fast-forward the video up to 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, or 16x creating smooth, watchable quick videos


Rylo 360 Camera in low light conditions is very shaky with deteriorating resolution.

First impressions:

Sounds good right? Take my money now, you say? Well, after living with Rylo for a month, don’t open your wallet just yet. Yes, the ability to frame your shot after filming is amazing and the stabilization in bright light is good.

But… The video quality often isn’t very high, the lenses scratch if you look at them wrong, and you still end up with too much footage requiring hours of editing later.

Low light performance is perhaps the greatest weakness of the camera when used for mountain biking. When out in the open sun, it’s good. But get under tree cover and image quality and stabilization suffer. In low light, video quality is just unacceptable.

The upside, as you can see in the videos is very good viewing options and stabilization in good light. When sightseeing or walking around, this is a very good camera since it stabilizes well and it captures everything.

Some concerns:

First, use a harder lens material. This is an action cam, it’s going to get bounced around. Sending it off for a $149 repair each time it scratches will not make customers happy.

Second, more work needs to be done with the video quality/resolution. Low light and varying light conditions create artifacts and pixelation. For $499 pixelated video isn’t cutting it no matter how stable it is. Firmware updates have been improving this, but more work is needed.

Lastly, there is NO desktop editing available at this time. All the fancy editing and motion tracking can only be done with a phone app. So file management and splicing together clips is not possible with the Rylo software. So you need to be comfortable with the phone (aka kids) and have a powerful phone with lots of free storage available.

This very well could be the camera of the future… In the future ;-). Stay tuned for our full review of this camera.

More Info: www.rylo.com


About the author: Francis Cebedo

The founder of mtbr and roadbikereview, Francis Cebedo believes that every cyclist has a lot to teach and a lot to learn. "Our websites are communal hubs for sharing cycling experiences, trading adventure stories, and passing along product information and opinions." Francis' favorite bike is the last bike he rode, whether it's a dirt jumper, singlespeed, trail bike, lugged commuter or ultralight carbon road steed. Indeed, Francis loves cycling in all its forms and is happiest when infecting others with that same passion. Francis also believes that IPA will save America.


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